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March 06, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, M

...

Wljr ALIIEIIIan ttx

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univ
eity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the usef
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherw
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seco
Bless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, ifsigned; the s
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at t
discretion of the Editor, if '.eft at or mailed to The Daily offic
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No ma
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments e
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clo
on the evening preceding insertion.

Fer
for
ise
nd
ig-
of
he
ce.
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had not very justly turned the crowd against him.
Illinois has twice proved her subjection to a
spirit of poor sportsmanship which is bound to
make her teams unpopular until the school and its
athletics are rid of it: once, in the win-at-any-price
decision on questionable playing in the second half
of the Michigan basketball game; and again in the
vituperous article which the Daily Illini employed
to cast Illinois' own guilt upon Michigan. One great
lesson is still to be learned by our sister-university
at Urbana - how to be a good loser.
THE AMERICAN LEGION DRIVE
Last fall a group of ex-service men secured a
charter and established a much needed University
of Michigan post of the American Legion: That
post is now conducting a campaign for five hun-

G

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+ ... ,'

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TEXTBOOKS

and

SUPPLIES for All
Both Stores

Colleges at

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR,
News Editor...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. w. Hitchcock
J.I. Dakin J. E. McManis
enaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Sunday Editor....................J.. ---.- A. Bernstein
City Editor .......... ..............B. P. Campbell
ditorals............ Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
Sorts ...................... ............... Robert Angell
Women's Editor............................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph..........I......................Thomas Dewey
Telescope.... ......................... ... Jack WV. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Wald Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Paul G. Weber Leo J. Hershdorfer valter Donnelly
Elizabeth Vickery Hughston Mcflain Beata Hasley
G. E. Clark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
George Reindel J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Dorothy Monfort W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecbt
Harry B. Grundy Paul Watzel william H. Riley Jr.
Prances. Oberholtzer J. W. Hlume, Jr. Sara Wailer
Robert E. Adams Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
George L. Stone M. A. Klaver

dred new members.
To recount at length the various and sundry ad-
vantages which membership in the organization of-
fers would be to use up valuable space telling some-
thing that every former soldier and sailor knows.
The legion is essentially a man's outfit, standing for
all that ex-service men believe it ought to further.
It boosts athletics; it works for the financial, so-
cial, and intellectual good of its members through
its campaigns in the interest of patriotism in gov-
ernment and its securing of compensation laws and
free education for veterans, and by providing a
means whereby former soldiers and sailors can get
together on an equal footing.
Certainly the University post should mean much
to the ex-fighters on the campus, and surely it
should ultimately do much for the benefit of its
members and for the University as well. The influ-
ence of the national organization has already come
to be recognizd and its opinions are held worthy of
serious consideration, and a post which has at hand
as many -former service men as there are in the
University should be able to count for something
in the organization as a whole, both state and na-
tional.
The Michigan post cannot be other than a benefit
to every one of its members, and it behooves every
Michigan man who was in the service to enroll now
while the campaign is on.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. mn.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to. 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit- :55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. M.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.mn., and 1:15 a.in.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
MARCH
S X T WV T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 - 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 8 29 30 81
: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

------- - ----= .--natty- -
= s c
~ '"u ,, mf...TRADE M R
PIPE'S the thing with men. Under the spell of
WD C Pipes men relax, fagged brains are relieved.
The specially seasoned genuine French briar breaks in sweet
and mellow. It will not crack' or burn through. The
W D C Triangle on the bowl is your guarantee. Ask any
good dealer.
W. DEUTH t CO., NEW YORK
WORLOS LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES

I

......, a _._. .

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .........LEGRANDr a. GAINES JR.
Advertising..................................-D. P. Joyce
Classifieds . ...................... .............Robt-.-0-Kerr
Publication ....................... ...........F. Al. Heath
Accounts ......................................1;. R. Priebs
Circulation ............... .................'...*.,.V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecbt P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Criss R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Tbos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
1. 1. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

is

PM

Goodyears- 124 South Main Street

J. J. aaou.w.a , ..

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
iue of The Daily should see the ight editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 1921.
Night Editor-J. E. McMANIS.

r
e

ILLINOIS' BOOMERANG
"The treatment accorded the Illini basketball
team in Ann Arbor last Saturday night was dis-
graceful, especially as it came from an institution
which has always pretended to stand for all that is
noble and good in college athletics," declared the
Daily Illini in an article which was reprinted on
this page Saturday morning.
We are surprised to see that the school whose
team was responsible for the trouble should care to
open the question.
Michigan never has any excuses to offer for the
very small minority who give vent to a rowdy and
unreasoning loyalty in catcalling and hissing. The
Purdue game is a proof that this class has come to
its senses.
But Michigan refuses to plead guilty to such an
indictment when her accusers are the guilty parties.
Perhaps the best way to answer such a groundless
tirade is to print the facts. Here is the truth about
the Illinois game:
During the first half the game was being played
on its merits and, with the exception of one Illinois
man's ejectment on account of rough playing, was
unmarred. The "razzing" from the stands which
characterized the second half was absent. Between
halves a special wrestling match had been scheduled
as part of the evening's program. Carney, Tabor,
and Hellstrom of the Illinois team, came up on the
floor to take some practice shots. During the prog-
ress of the wrestling match spectators repeatedly
requested the three players to stop long enough to
give them a chance to see the wrestlers; but with
absolute disregard of the ordinary laws of cour-
tesy, the Illinois men continued to shut out the view
of the match and at times even ran into the officials
of the contest.
By the time the second half started the temper of
the crowd was considerably altered, as may be ex-
pected. It now became only too apparent that Illi-
nois, angered at being on the losing end, had de-
cided to change tactics and rough it. Carney was
sent in, and his first act was to aim a blow at Wil-
liams which missed the Michigan player by a hair.
The crowd, as red-blooded crowds will, let itself be
heard when the referee, who had seen the foul, re-
fused to penalize. The official continued to fan the
flame throughout the half by calling only techni-
cals, or not calling at all when unjustifiable rough-
ing by either side occurred. When Illinois' inten-
tion to rough it became known, the Wolverines
fought back. The second half was the best - or
worst - football game ever seen in Waterman gym-
nasium. Michigan teams do not lie down and let
themselves be run over.
The Illini sinks to the level of calling up past an-
tagonisms which Michigan has tried, in the sincer-
est interests of friendship, to forget. It ascribed
the crowd's attitude toward Carney and Walquist to
the Illinois football victory of last fall, and men-
tions Walquist's tripping of Perrin which cost us
the game. As a matter of fact, few spectators in
the gymnasium knew who Walquist *as and Car-
ney would have come in for considerable admira-
tion for playing with his game leg if his attitude

Blouse

Mary and Doug, Pickford and Fairbanks, respec-
tively, are going to Mexico for a rest. For artists,
they have gone on a long time without a family
scrap, and probably Mexico is as appropriate a place
to start as any.

s,

If an eight hour day with double returns for over-
time were established around here, we are inclined
to wonder how many millions those who really do
study would rake in during the year.

N ew and Smart

I

The Telescope

4

Dear Noah:
Last night when I was down at the Armory, the
fellow who brought me kept letting his head fall
on my shoulder. What should I say to let him know
I don't approve of that sort of thing? Co-Edna.
The next time he lets his head fall down that
way, let him know where you stand by simply say-
ing to him, "Keep it up."

I!

i

Today's nominee for the Royal Order of Oil Cans
is your frosh friend who pretends not to see you
when you meet him out some night minus his pot.

A

Pity the Blind!
The fellow in church
Who discovers too late
That he hasn't a cent
When they're passing the plate.

A6
Nothing ivill better express one's indibiduality
and good taste in choice of apparel than a
smart blouse.
An overblouse of minuette in reseda green,
flesh, honeydew or white will add a finish-
ing touch of character to your spring cos-
tume in a manner which only such ma-
terial and styles can give. $11.50
A blouse or an overblouse of crepe de chine
in any one of the new shades is charm-
ing in its evidences of authenticity. Col-
lar may be high or low, and sleeves long
or short-modishness is expressed either
way. $9.50 to $16.65.
A blouse of pongee with two-in-one collar or
Buster Brown collar effect will be exquis-
itely tailored- and very much in style.
$3.50 to $6.50.
A handmade blouse will be extremely dainty
in its details of needlwork on hemstitch-
ing, filet lace and pin tucks. Of batiste
or French voile; with,, long or short

l

We trust that our friends will be as gratified as we
are to learn that the cut of ourselves which we ran
some while back has brought results. At the pres-
ent time two patent medicine beauty companies,
after having viewed the likeness, are dickering with
us for the use of our picture to run in connection
with their advertisements.
Confidentially, though, we don't mind telling our
readers that we think the deal will fall through be-
cause we are unable to agree as to just how the ad-
vertisement should be worded. Both of the com-
panies are agreed in saying that our picture is just
the one they want to use in connection with their
beauty ad. The difference of opinion comes in
because both are equally insistent that the words,
"BEFORE TAKING THE TREATMENT"
should appear under our editorial likeness and at
this writing we haven't quite been won over to their
way of thinking.

D'ja ever stop to think
When a fortune awaits the man
Who invents a sorority hammock?
You know, one of those kind that
Are only large enough for one
But strong enough to hold two.
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC BANQUET TO-
NIGHT - my favorite Daily head.
While we've never attended an athletic banquet
we presume it's one where they serve healthful
food.

sleeves.

$5 to $15

(Second Floor)

,2G 7

124 South Main

w

Famous Closing Lines
"I'm glad you're so poor," said the bride as she
married the $250-a-week living skeleton.
NOAH COUNT.

} - .4 I

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