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March 06, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-06

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SECTION

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS

ONE

DAY AMD NIGHIT
SERtICE

11 IRS

t

VOL. XXXI. No. 105. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

MICHIGAN

WINS

FROM

OHIO,

36-22

"OUIT -FfGHTING "
HUGHES ,TO COSTA
RICA ND PANAMA
NEW SECRETARY OF STATE ACTS
ON RUMPUS BETWEEN
REPUBLICS x
U. S. READY To ENFORCE,
PEACE, N O TE INFERS
Urges Peaceful Solution of Dispute
Over Disputed Territory
of Coto
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 5.-Cessation of
hostilities between Costa Rica and
Panama is demanded in identical
notes which it was learned tonight at
the state department had been dis-
patched to the governments of those
two countries by Charles Evans
Hughes, the new secretary of state.
This action was the first of the
Harding administration in the realm
of foreign affairs and was said to have
been based 'on the broad grounds of
expediency. The, dispute between the
Central American republics involved
American interests in the Panama
canal zone..
A peaceful solution of the dispute
over the territory of Coto on the bas-
is of the White award is said to have
been urged. The note did not sug-
gest mediation by the United States,.
but was understood to have conveyed
the impression that this country stood
ready to enforce, if necessary, a

Swimmers' Petition For Recognition
To Come Before Campus Mlonday

Are the students of the University
willing to back their swimming team'
with their names? That is the ques-
tion which will be answered tomorrow
when the petition of the tank men for
recognition will be circulated on the
campus. Tables will be placed in ad-
vantageous positions along the diag-
onal and at other busy localities and
the students, as they pass, will be ask-
ed to give a few seconds of their time
to append their names to the petition.
In order that time may not be wasted
in reading what appears on the sheets
the request of the swimmers is repro-{
duced below:
The Petition
"We, the undersigned students of
the University of Michigan, do hereby
petition the Board in Control of Ath-
letics for the immediate recognition of
swimming, that our team may repre-
sent the University at the Conference
meet on March 17 and 18.
"We believe that the record made by
the organization this year is such that
it thoroughly deserves such recogni-
tion, and that the showing which it
will make against the eight other Con-
ference teams entered in the meet will
bring great credit upon themselves
and upon the University.
"We believe, further, that the recog-
nition of the sport will furnish the ne-
cessary incentive for the completion
of the Union swimming pool, both as
regards the student body and the
alumni.
"We do, therefore, respectfully re-
quest that swimming be given the stat-
us of a Varsity sport, the rules for the
awarding of the size "M" decided upon
by the board to be similar to those ap.
plying to track, and that the $eam be
sent to the Conference meet."

On Campus All Day
From 8 o'clock in the morning until
2 o'clock in the afternoon. the cam-
paign will continue upon the campus.
In the afternoon and evening attempts
will be made to round up any signa-
tures yet unattached by visits to var-
ious fraternities, clubs, and boarding
houses. It is hoped by those in
charge that the most difficult task of
the drive will be the counting of the
signatures. Opinion expressed by
numbers of unprejudiced students is
that if the men and women of the Un-
iversity will bear in mind that in
signing they will be doing a sgvice to
their school there should be no dif-
ficulty in obtaining every signature.
NO IN iTATiON
TO FRIDA'Y YET
X. A. C. Offers Not Yet Extended to
University of Michigan
Authority
CALLED "BEST EQUIPPED
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIST"
"I have received no invitation to be-
come president of M A. C., and I do
not know what action I would take
until I have been asked to accept the
position and had due time to con-
sider it," said Prof. David Friday yes-
terday when asked whether he would
consider the offer.
Members of the State Board of Agri-
culture have been canvassed by per-
sons desirous of seeing Professor Fri-

FIVE NEW MEMBERS
ELECTED BY GOIF
Elections - to the Order of Coif, na-
tional honorary Law fraternity, from
the senior class of the Law school
were announced yesterday.
The ien chosen are as follows: H.
A. August, A. G. Bouchard, H. M.
Shapero, W. N. Snow, and J. P.
Thoman.
A limit of 10 per cent of the grad-
uating class is placed on choices for
Coif and as this year's class numbers
100, it is still possible to pick five
more men for membership this year.
Officials say that there may be further
elections, as they have left the way
clear to make additions to the list
already prepared.
The date for the initiation has not
been set so far but it is expected that
it will be held late in the spring.

MICHI6AN WINS COURT GAME FROM.
03s 5. U., 36 TO 22; ILLINOIS FIRST
IN RELAY CONTEST AT CHAMPAIGSN

MICHIGAN NOW TIED FOR SECOND
WITH WISCONSIN,
AND ILL.
MILLER AND KARPUS
FEATURE BY FAST PLAY

ILLINOIS
IN

TAKES FIRST PLACE
ANNUAL RELAY
GAMES

CRUIKSHANK WINS FIRST
PLACE IN BROAD JUMP

I

Wolverines

Lead Buckeyes
at Close of
Half

18 to 71

Pennsylvania
Event

Wine One Mile Relay
In University
Class

MONDAY
LAST
Detroit Symphor
Cyrena Va
Pro

CONCERT
OF S'ERIES.
ny Orchestra and
in Gorden on
gram

peaceful solution..
Secretary Weeks was called in
after the conference began and
sented later dispatches from
Canal zone as to the situation.
Denby discussed the question
with the President.

soon
pre-
the
Mr.
later

day appointed and as a sufficient num-I

Replies from Panama and Costa
Rica to the notes dispatched several
days ago by former Secretary Colby'
were received today at the state de-
partment. That from Panama was
said to have expressed a willingness
to accept the offer of the good offices
of the United States in attempting to
settle the dispute, but the one from
Costa Rica was described as unsatis-
factory.
300 ATTEND ,BANQUET OF
WA AT BABU YM
With more than 30t. members pres-
ent, the Women's Athletic association
assembled for its fifth annual banquet
and cotillion last night in Barbour
gymnasium. Class songs, toasts, and
basketball stunts comprising the en-
tertainment during the early part of
'the evening, were followed by danc-
ing varied with favor specials.
Miss Marion Wood, director of phy-
sical education, in a brief talk to the
members after the banquet outlined a
few of the benefits, including modern
showers, a swimming pool, and an ex-
tended gymnasium, which she hopes
will result from the appropriation
bill, Miss Wood's talk was followed
by a sk:etch of the history of the as-
sociation given by Clarissa Vyn, '18,
a former president of the organiza-
tion. Phyllis Wiley, '21, acted as
toastmistress.
Arm bands and pins were awarded
those women holding the necessary
number of paints. The following re-
ceived pins Helen Bishop, '22; Lois
ppVries, '21; Marion Koch, '23; Joan-
na Graham, '21; Frances Weimer, '22;
Katrina 1chermerhorn, '21; Beatrice
Beckgwith, '21,
Arm bands were given to Edlith
Apfel, '21; Narcena Bassett, '21; Helen
Bishop, '22; Gertrude Boggs, '22;
Porothy Brown, 123; Leota Clarke, '22;
Margaret Cosgrove, '23; Martha Dodd,
'23; Grace Fry, '23; Harriet Gustin,
'22; Emma Koshetz, '23; Selma Muel-
er, '22; Iathryn Potter, '23; Miriam
Rchlotterbeck, '23; Elsa Oiesen, '23;
Evelyn Rockwell, '22; Hazel Storz:
'22; Elsie Townsend, '22; Thekla Wer-
moth, '22; Joyce Van Alstyne, '23.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
UP FOR VOTE TODAY
PLAN SUBMITTED BY COMMITTEE
OF UPPERCLASS
MEN
A plan for student self-government
which has been drawn up by the
committee appointed at a meeting of
upperclass men some time ago will be
submitted to the joint meeting of se-
niors and juniors called for 3:30
o'clock this afternoon in the Assem-
bly hall of the Union for discussion
and ratification.
The plan has been drawn up by the
committee after a long series of
meetings during which every phase of
the matter has been gone over and
discussed from all standpoints, An
attempt has been made to incorporate
in this plan the views of the students
as expressed at the first meeting when
a strong desire was evidenced for a
form of organization through which
the students could have some voice
in matters pertaining to their con-
duct. If the plan as outlined by the
committee meets with favor at the
meeting today it will be submitted to
the student body for final adoption.
A new set of rules to govern stu-a
dent dances has also been drawn up
by the committee and will be submit-
fed for ratification by the upperclass
men. Ideas expressed by the stu-
dents at the first meeting have also
been incorporated in these rules in so
far as the committee considered ad-
visable. Reports will also be given by
the committees on traditions and on
convocations.
The meeting has been called by Le
Grand A. Gaines Jr., president of the
Student council, who is desirous of
having a full attendance at the gath-
ering so that as wide an expression
of opinion may be obtained as possi-
ble before the plan of government goes
to the campus at large for ratification.

ber of the board regard him as the
proper man for the position it is un-
derstood that he can have the office
if he wants it.
Professor Friday is working on the
state budget and helping Governor
Groesbeck with the state's financial
affairs. In this connection with the
M. A. C. budget he has surprised
many persons with his knowledge of
agricultural teachings. Since Pro-
fessor Friday began to make his
knowledge of the school and its work-
ings known he has been looked upon
as especially fitted for the presidency
by Governor Groesbeck and L. Whit-
ney Watkins, a member of the school
board.
James McBride, one of the Ameri-
can Bureau's national committee on
economics, is one of the canvassers for
Professor Friday. "He is the best
equipped agricultural economist in the
country," said Mr. McBride.
Professor Friday was born and
reared on a Michigan farm and is still
interested, with two of his brothers,
in farms in the fruit belt. He taught
country school and did not enter col-
lege until he was 29 years of age.
His salary in the economics depart-
ment here is $4,500. The president of
M. A. C. receives a salary of $7,500 a
year.
LIBRARY SHOWING
COSTLY BINDINGS
Valuable book bindings from the li-
brary of Albert May Todd of Kalama-
zoo are now being exhibited in the
main corridor of the Library. The
books, which just recently arrived in
this country, were purchased in Eng-
land last summer by Mr. Todd and
shipped direct to Ann Arbor for the
exhibit.
The earliest binding in the collec-
tion is the work of St. Augustine dat-
ing from 1550. French, Spanish,
Dutch, and English bindings of the
18th century compose a large part of
the exhibit. Modern bindings consist
of works by Zaehnsdorf, Riviere and
Son, and Bedford. Riviere and Son
are probably the best English binders
of today, while Bedford's works arel

THIRD APPEARANCE HERE
OF POPULAR ORCHESTRA
Cyrena Van Gorden, contralto solo-
ist, and the Detroit Symphony orches-
tra will give the last rogram in the
Choral Union concert series tomor-
row in Hill auditorium.
The popularity of the Detroit or-
ganization has already been shown by
the large audiences in attendance on-
its two previous appearances in Ann
Arbor this season. An added interest
is offered in the person of Miss Van
Gorden, distinguished contralto of the
Chicago Opera association. She has
a voice of depth, richness, and varie-
ty of color such as have characterized
the contraltos of the past. She is
said to eclipse most of them in beauty
and regal bearing.
She made her debut with the Chi-
cago Opera association in the role of
Ameris in Aida, which she will sing
in this year's May Festival. Critics
the country over are united in their
praise of her work.
The program is as follows:
Overture, "Russlan et Ludmilla"
......... . ...... . ... Glinka
First Symphony, Opus 68 in C
minor ............... .... Brahms
The Cry of the Valkyries from.
"The Valkyrie" ..........Wagner
Aria: "OMio Fernando" from "La
Favorita".............. Donizetti
Overture Solonelle "1812"'.....
. .......... Tchaikowsky
D SARGENT CAMPIN
NETS 3242.60 TO DATE

BULLETIN
Purdue forged into the lead in the
Conference basketball race as a result
of Saturday's games. The Boler-
makers have won eight and lot four
contests.. Three teams, Michgan, 11-
linois, and Wisconsin are tied for se-'
ond position with seven victories and
four defeats.. Following are last'
night's results: Michigan 36, Ohio
22; Chicago 29, Illinois 26; Purdue 21,
Iowa 19; Wisconsin 18, Minnesota 12.
(Special to The Daily)
Columbus, O., March 5.-Michigan
tied with Wisconsin and Illinois for
second in the Big Ten basket-
ball standing last night when it sank
Ohio State 36 to 22 at the Coliseum.
Scoring from almost any angle of the
floor the Wolverines gained an early
lead which was not endangered
throughout.
The Ann Arbor men were more su-
perior in floor work than the result
would indicate, this being due to the
number of fouls registered by the'
Buckeyes. In all Greenspun tossed
in 8 of 10 free throws compared with
a 2 out of 3 record for Captain Kar-
pus of the visitors.
For the Buckeyes, Stinchcomb and
Blair stood out far above the other
players.
Miller was the big scorer of the
evening with six field baskets to his
credit. Karpus garnered 8 points,
making 3 baskets and 2 fouls. Blair
scored 4 field goals for the losers,
while Greenspun scored 8 fouls,
REP. WAN TO SPEAK ON
AMERICANISM TONIGHT
Representative Julius Kahn of Cali-
fornia, who speaks on "The True
American" at the Union services at 7
o'clock tonight at Hill auditorium, is
one of the foremost statesmen of the.
day, and an authority on military mat-
ters, according to T. S. Evans, gen-
eral secretary of the S. C. A. Mr.
Kahn was the first chairman of the
National Defense league, secured the
passage of the selective draft law, and
was chairman of the house committee
on military affairs. He was favora-
bly mentioned for the post of secre-
tary of war.
Mr. Kahn was born in 1861 in the
town of Kuppenheim, the Grand+
Duchy of Baden. When he was five
years old the family moved to Califor-
nia, where he was educated in the
public schools, until the age of 16,1
when he went to work in a commission
house, which he later left for the
stage. While on the stage he appear-
ed with Joseph Jefferson, Ed-Win
Booth, Salvini, and Mr. and Mrs. T.;
J. Florence.1
In 1890 he began the study of law,
and in 1894 was admitted to the bar.
During these years he served a term
in the California Assembly, but de-
clined nomination to the state senate.
He was first elected to congress in
1899, and has served continuously
since except for the years 1903-1905.
Mr. Kahn's chief work has been in
the interest of national defense. It
was Mr. Kahn, who, in 1913, with the
assistance of other patriots, founded
the National Defense league, and be-
came its first chairman. Through the
efforts of the league the country was
first roused to the defenselessness df
the nation and the weakness of the
army and navy. He is a strong ad-
vocate of universal military training.

(By Associated Press)
Champaign, Ill., March 5,-Athletic
stars of the University of Illinois car-
ried off the honors in the fourth relay
carnival staged by the university ath-
letic authorities. Four records were
shattered. There was a record break-
ing list of entries numbering 349 from
43 universities -and colleges.
Records were broken in the run-
ning high jump, mile relay, four-mile
relay and the one mile college relay.
SUMMARIES
Two mile relay won by Illinois
(McGinnis, Donohue, Brown, Yates);
second, Michigan; Ames, third. Time
8:04 4-5. Seventy-five yard dash won
by Deering (Nebraska); second, Brad-
ley (Kansas);. third, Gallagher (Kan-
sas Aggies). Time 8 seconds. Seven-
ty-five yard high hurdles won by
Wright (Nebraska); second, Anderson
(Minnesota); third, Wynn (Notre
Dame). Time 10 seconds.
Pole vault won by Wesbrook (Michi-
gan); isecoid, Wilder (Wisconsin);
third, Hope (Kansas Aggies). Height
12 feet 1-4 inch. Shot put won by
Shaw (Notre Dame); second, Sande-
fur (Kansas); third, Weiss (Illinois).
Distance 43 feet 6 inches.
Six hundred yard run won by Don-
ohue, Ill.; second, Mitchell, Reserve;
third, Burns, Michigan. Running high
jump, Walker, Michigan, Paige, Ames,
Albert, Ill., tied for first. Height 6
feet 3-4 inch. Four mile university
relay won by ill.; second, Kansas
Aggies; third, Wisconsin. Time 18
minutes, 35 4-5 seconds.
Three hundred yard run won by
Waldo of Grinnell; second, Shaw of
Notre Dame; third, Field, Ill. Time
33 seconds. Mile relay (college) won
by Wabash; second, DePauw; third,
Eureka. Time 3 minutes, 57 2-5 sec-
onds. Running broad Juimp won by
Cruikshank, Michigan; second, Albert,
Illinois; third, Paige, Ames. Distance
22 feet, 7 3-4 inches. Seventy-five yard
hurdles won by Gallagher, Kansas
Aggies; second, Desch, Notre Dame;
third, Williams, Missouri. Time 8 2-5
seconds.
One thousand yard run won by
Brown, Illinois; second, Burkholder,
Michigan; third, Draper, Butler. Time
2 minutes, 5 seconds. Mile relay (uni-
versity) won by Pennsylvania; sec-
ond, Michigan; third, Chicago. Time
3 minutes, 29 seconds.
Medley relay won by Ames (Hig-
gins, Pohlman, Webb, Graham); sec-
ond, Purdue; third, Illinois. Time 8
minutes, 24 seconds. Tied Carnival
record. All around championship won
by Hamilton, Missouri (5230); sec-
ond, Osborne, Illinois (5078); third,
Hill, Ohio State (4719).
Little Damage Done by Fire
Little damage resulted from a fire
among waste paper in the basement of
Sugden's drug store, 302 South State
street, about 11 o'clock yesterday
morning.
SENIOR, JUNIOR MEN TO
MEET SUNDAY AT UNION
All senior and Junior men are
requested to meet at 3:30 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the As-
sembly hall of the Union to hear
and discuss the reports of the
various committees on student
government.'
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr,
President.

MARTHA COOK WILL GIVE
FIT CARD PARTY
SATURDAY

BENE-

With only 9 of the 20 teams report-
ing, a total of $242.50 was pledged to-
ward the Dr. Clara Sargent campaign
fund, at 5 o'clock last evening. Martha
Cook building, which made the first
contribution toward the fund, has
raised its donation to $170, and will
give a benefit card party on next Sat-
urday afternoon. Other large houses
are planning entertainments to raise
money.
Captains of the various teams in the
University Y. W. C. A. drive are as
follows:
Rena Bailey, '21, Frances Buckbee,
'21, Ruth Deemer, '22, Dixie England,
'21, Catherine Greenough, '23, Ernes-
tine Hall, '21, Judith Jenison, '22, Mar-
ion Koch, '23, Margaret Kraus, '23,
Mildred Lawton, '21, Neva Lovewell,
'22, Josephine McGuineas, '21, Mar-
garet Spaulding, '22, Mabel Stickle,
'21, Margaret McIntyre, '23, Helen
Roberts, '23, Merle Trebilcock, '21,

THE WEATHER

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t

Probably Rain or Snow; Somewhat I the most famous. Materials used are Josephine Waldo, '21, Dorothy Win-
Warmer in Southern Portion; Fresh various kinds of morocco, straight chell, '21, and Doris StarkWeather,
Strong Northwest Winds, grained levant, and crushed levant. School of Music.

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