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March 06, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,abity & Safety are the most essential
things to consiuer. When you invest
in bonds, mortgages, etc., & need
money, you can seldom get it without
loss. The HURONi VALLEY BLDG. &
SAVINGS ASSO. always pays invest-
ors on demand. It has never paid less
than 6 per ct. dividends, compounded
semi-annually, free from taxes. Your
money with us is secured by several

hundred choice mortgages. Never Hi
foreclosed a mortgage in 25 years, MRAMAJIC
never lost a dollar in 25 years. Under
State control. Win. L. Walz, Pres., H.
H. Herbst, Sec'y. A. A. Savings Bank
Bldg.-Adv.E

Have you tried those wonderful
day Chicken Ilinners at Teet'sA
ing Rooms.-Adv.

r;_

k

For

STUD Y LAMPS

and all kinds of

Sun- AIM IS PRESENTATION OF ONE-
Din- ACT PLAYS AND DRAMATIC
- STUDY
"Mummers," the new dramatic so-
ciety for women has been recognized
by Dean Joseph A. Bursley and Prof.
Louis A. Strauss. The society consists
of a group of girls especially interest-
ed in the presenting of one-act plays
and has for its purpose dramatic
study. Several one-act plays will be
presented dUring this semester at
Women's league parties. No public
performances are being planned at
present.
the first meeting, which will be an
election of officers will be held at 4
o'clock, Monday afternoon, March 7.
in the parlors of Barbour gymnasium.
Plans will be made at that time for a
playlet to be given at the Women's
league party, March 25.
Following are the names of those

.
i

Carter, '24; Laurella Hollis, '24; Sara
Wailer, '22; Mary Kirkpatrick, '21;
Madeline McGurk, '24; Dorothy Rock-
well, '24; Mable Stickle, '21; Theo-
dosia Burton, '23; Mildred Sherman,
'21; Kathryn Potter, '23; Edith Staeb-
ler, '22; Martha MacLean, '22; Lois
Greene, '21; Gladys Squire, '23; Rose
Tobias, '23; Dorothy Southgate, '23;
Joanne Grahame, '21; Marian Millar,;
'22; Lucia Boynton, '22; Lyda Rideout,
'23; Merry Wagner, '23; Dorothy Van
Dusen, '23; Helen Partlow, '23; Kath-
erine Riggs, '24; Florence Derrick,
'22; Dorothy Jeffry, '24; Hortense Mil-
lar, '24; Thekla Roese, '22; Margaret
Beckett, '22; Deborah Jones, '23; Mary
Van Deinse, '22; Adeline Boaz, '24;
Edith Barber, '24; and Elizabeth
Beash, '24.

Established

1905

FLASHLIGHTS
ENLARGEMENTS

KOD AKS

FILMS

AMATEUR FINISHING

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES

i

go o

'

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

R. 0. T. C. NOTICE
1 Student
is required to complete the en-
rollment in the infantry unit of
the R. O. T. C. Enroll now in
room 241, Engineering building.

...
..
,;
...

LYNDON & COMPAN
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY'

t

PHONE 273

200 WASHINGTON ST.

I

Urs e lirrruiltl-Then111111111111 Dec111111111111110111111fieII I IIIIII
USe Itmm en e%.Lde

elected to membership: Hazel Storz,
'22; Elizabeth Travis, '23; Cecile
Baer, '22; Rosilind Freund, '24; Dor-
othy Weimer, '24; Constance Ling',
'23; Pauline Miller, '24; Lillian Scher,
'24; Ruth Sykes, '21; Vivian McDon-
ald, '24; Zelda Ziliak, '23; Velma

Come to Teet's Dining Rooms, 805
E. Huron St. for your Sunday Night
Lunches.-Adv.
We serve dinners to parties. Teet's
Dining Rooms, 805 E. Huron St.-Adv.

Why are you so Insistent?

F t
lrr

Valet AutoStrop Razor
Is Complete in Itself
It is more'than a razor-more
thaqa safety device. .
It is strapped, it shaves and is
cleaned without taking apart;
without even removing theblade.
And like a perfectly stropped
ordinary razor, the blade im-
proves with use.
And it doesn't cost you a cent
to prove all this to your own
satisfaction.'

We Will Lend You
A Valet AutoStrop Razor for
a full thirty day trial. If you then
decide to keep it, pay us $5.00 for
it-if not, return it without further
obligation.
You Pay Nothing to Try
This Razor
Any, responsible party can ar-
range at our Cutlery counter for
this Free Trial. If you have a
charge account, write to us and we
will mail the razor to you.
You are given the opportunity
of trying this wonderful Razor,
witjout any kind of risk. For-a
month your shaving will cost you
nothing-then you may return the
razor if you can get along without
it.

Any way you look at it - = whether from the
standpoint of purity, therefore safety; or from
the standpoint of food value, of genuine good-
ness; you are justified in ordering

Mr,. V esimer 's

Theefsteak

Dinners are so Hard

Because

to Equal

ICE CREAM

Opposite D. U. R. Station
Just Above Rae Theatre

f'

I ,

.I

I. - _______4W_______________________k_______
= WXJomen
Members of the Friends church at-
tending the University are invited to
e, = the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Kelsey
at 915 Greenwood avenue, at 4 o'clock
this afternoon. Any members of this
-* ac Vtah whon have not received person-
~~~1 G al invitations are urged to attend the
. -meeting. -
There will be a meeting of the girls
whohave been elected to "Mummers"
5 aat 4 o'clock Monday afternoon, in the
parlors of Barbour gymnasium. All
members who are not present, and
awhose absence is not explained to
Theodosia Burton, '23, or Florence
Derrick, '224 will be automoaically
_ dropped from the organization.
.- iluunuli ruluinulmiiinumuuu mm n nunuu u unu~i inmk:
Junior Girls' play will rehearse at 4
THIS o'clock Monday in Sarah Caswell
II CLUMN Angell hall.
CLOSES CLOSES
AT 3 P.M. ADVERTISING AT 3 PM.-___
LOST AND FOUND FOB SALE k MODERNIZE
LOST-A leather notebook, probably FOR SALE-Fur chokers just received =R
in Gym locker room, very important from New York City. Will sell at ___
notes. Name on cover. Return to surprisingly low prices. Zwerdling. OLD-FASHIONED
Howard A. Donahue, 602 I. Huron. Established 1904. Ladies' Tailoring IWED IG
Phone 396. 105-2 and Fur Shop. 217 East Liberty N
St. 103-3R
LOST-A wljite cat with one blue eye -033RING
and one green gye near S. U. and FOR SAIVE-Two tickets for concert,
Washtenaw. Reward. Call Pres- Monday evening, in section 5, row It can be made over ,
ton, 2738. 105-1 0. $1.50 a piece. Call 1177-J. 104-2 Into the beautiful new
LOST-Child's red fox fur on Hill FOR SALE-Two tickets for concert __ Orange Blossom design-
street, Sunday evening, between 6 Monday. Section 5. Row 16. Price w 1ItIhiou1t cutting the
and 7. Reward. Phone 513-F2. 104-3 $1.00 each. Call Pfluke. 2738. 105-1 is nt destroye, itori
LOST-1 black fur mitten on Wash- FOR SALE-Two adjacent seat tick- the cherished sentiment
tenaw or S. University. Call Jas- ets, Choral Union Monday evening. the circlet In any
low, 936-J. 103-3 Call Michigan Union. 105-1 way harmed.
LOST-Girl's Red Sweater, Thursday, FOR SALE-Mahogany Victrola with Ask for particulars
of, last week, between Ferry Field record cabinet. Ask for Turnbull,
and 433 Maynard. Phone 2707-J. 105 603 S. State. 105-1
LOST-Masonic ring. Phone Irey, FOR RENT
288-3. 104-2 FOR RENT- Single room. Opposite H A L L E R
WANTED Hill Auditorium. Electric light, AND
steam heat, practically on Campus.
WANTED-Student salesmen wanted Best room in town. 238 S. Thayer
at once. Part time. Splendid sell- St. 668-R. Mrs. Burke. Price F U L L E R
ing proposition. See Mr. Engdal, $4.00. 103-3
1218 Wasternaw, Sunday 2-6. 105-1 STATE STREET
- -- FOR RENT-Just the rooms for one JEWELERS
WANTED-A used 17 or 18 ft, canoe. who likes comfort. Large, with all
E. D. Blair, 1412Geddes Ave. Phone modern conveniences. In front of
2316-J. 103-4 house. Very congenial people. Well
located. Very desirable. 2388-J.
WANTED-To buy or rent a canoe; 18 105-1
ft., or with sponson attachment pre- FOR RENT-Large alcove suite with
ferred. Call Morris. 2143-J. 103-3 hot and cold water in room. Gentle-
FORSAL men preferred. Board if desired.,
Reduced rates. Phone 481-R. 104-3
FOR SALE - Pair men's cordovan IN
shoes. Size 8. Cost me $18. Worn FOR RENT - Desirable room, one Vert thin Watch
less than one week. Will sell cheap. block from campus. Box H. A.,
Phonn R11 -104-3 Daily. 105-3

i

What Is Air Pressure?
HE air is composed of molecules. They constantly
bombard you from all sides. A thousand taps by,a
thousand knuckles will close a barn door. The taps
as a whole constitute a push. So the constant bombardment
of the air molecules constitutes a push. At sea-levei the air
molecules push against every square inch of you with a
total pressure of nearly fifteen pounds.
Pressure, then, is merely a matter of bombarding mole-
cules.

r _

ft

When you boil water you make its molecules fly off.
The water molecules collide with the air molecules, It takes
a higher temperature to boil water at sea-level than on Pike's
Peak. Why? Because there are more bQmbarding molecules
at sea-level-more pressure.
Take away all the air pressure and you have a peifect
vacuum. A perfect vacuum has never been created. In the
best vacuum obtainable there, are still over two billion mole-
Cules of air per cubic centimeter, or about as many as there
are people on the whole earth.
Heat a substance in a vacuum and you may. discover
properties not revealed under ordinary pressure. A new
field for scientific exploration is opened.
Into this field the Research Laboratories of the General
Electric Company have penetrated. Thus one of the chem-
ists in the Research Laboratories studied the disintegration
of heated metals in highly exhausted bulbs. What happened
to the glowing filament of a lamp, for example? The glass
blackened. But, why? He discovered that the metal dis-
tilled in the vacuum depositing on the glass.
This was research in pure science - research in what
may be called the chemistry and physics of high vacua. It
was undertaken to answer a question. It ended in the dis-
covery of a method of filling lamp bulbs with an inert gas
under pressure so that the filament would not evaporate so
readily. Thus the efficient gas-filled lamp of today grew out
of a purely scientific inquiry.
So, unforeseen, practical benefits often result when
research is broadly applied.
N^
General Office Schenectady N.Y.

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