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February 27, 1921 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ASHES

FROM THE

I

I

IN ANN ARBOR THIS WEEK

1

i

SCREEN

AND STAGE'

(By Edwin R. Meiss.)
Just to prove that variety is still
the spice of life Lionel Barrymore ap-
pears today at the Majestic as a com-
edian in "The Great Adventure," af-
ter having played the hero and the
villain respectively in his first two.
screen productions, "The Copperhead"
and "The Master Mind." This mem-
ber of the Barrymore family needs no
recommendation as an actor whose
merit has been well portrayed by the

'i

'BUTTON-BUTTON'

screen.

* * *

1

Barrymore plays the part of an art-
ist and modest woman-hater (one who
fears the apposite sex) who after be-
ing tricked into giving the sparkler
to an adventuress realizes his mistake
and runs away to distant climes.
While there his butler digs and the
artist, in order to dodge his fiancee,
adopts his late butler's name, and has
himself buried in Westminster Abbey.
But time passes, the artist marries a
young widow, is forced to paint in
order to gain the wherewithal of life,
his works are recognized, and after a
round of difficulties the curtain falls
upon a serene fade-away, and a satis-
fied audience.

(Continued from Page One)
incoming freshman: he lands on the
campus and settles down, and the
first thing he begins to hear is talk
of this society or that fraternity, this
organization or that spook outfit, and
he is bewildered. He doesn't know
which way to turn; he sees himself
surrounded by a mass of associations
of which he himself knows nothing
and he begins to get the idea that he's
the only fellow on the campus who
doesn't amount to anything.

'Then you got to be a sophomore;
you became sophisticated and "on"
to the ways of the world and the
tricks of the trade., But somehow you
still stayed out of things. With the
exception of a certain class of organ-
izations to which one can petition for
membership and get in by paying a
fee and walking around the room
blindfolded, the second year man is
out of it. You got to be a sopho-
more and you were still impressed by
your friend's wide'acquaintance-but
not so niuch so as at first.
And then you passed from the im-
maturerunderclassman to the suppos-
edly grown-up junior and you "got
wise." You "made" some organiza-
tions yourself; you got some acquaint-
ances and you suddenly discovered
that you knew about half the folks
on the diagonal also. Your acquaint-
ances were more numerous and the
campus seemed smaller.
Fools Father on Fees
And thereupoon you discovered that)
the high and mighty upon whom youI
had been lavishing your reverential
attentions all this time wasn't a bit
"bigger" than you were yourself. He.
perhaps belonged to a list of organi-
zations just a's you were then begin-
ning to do; and the chances are that
he paid a yearly bill of dues of one
kind and another that would have
staggered fond papa had not said papa
always found it charged up to cloth-
ing or boarding expense or some such
item and had therefore failed to mar-
vel. Sons are always extravagant in,
clothes and food while in college and
papas are not surprised when they

In other words, the junior and sen-
for years of the college man's exist-
ence seem to be the ones in which are
crammed all mysteries of initiation
and all the sorrows' of yearly fees.
As an underclassman he looks on
and marvels, and that is all; he is
left out. But as a third or fourth
year man he gets his share, he makes
many acquaintancs, finds his activi-
ties and loyalties divided between
four or eight or a dozen societies,
his expenses corresponding spread
out, and his time chopped up into lit-
tle chunks so that sometimes he is
prevented from doing his best in any
one line.
Perhaps that is an unfair estimate
of the situation; perhaps the number
of societies makes possible activities
that could not be carried on other-
wise. But on the whole it would seem
that more of unification of aims would
be a lot better for everyone concern-
ed. The trouble with a combination
of the existing orders is that it is
only human nature for severy one of
them to want some glory for itself
and a mingling of organizations would
not make that possible.
Time Will Solve Problem
So probably the thing will all final-
ly solve itself by the dying out of a
lot of groups. Faculty men and stu-
dents say that the campus is over-
organized and that the energies of
each one of us are so divided and
spread out that we hit only the sur-
face of the things we try to do. All

are called upon to pay big bills for
these necessities.

SCHUBERT
D TTRO I

Nights - 50c to $2.t
Sat. Mat. 60" to $2.4
Wed. Mat. - 600 to

Edward Royce's Production
of the new
IVAN CARYLL MUSICAL HIT
~Ki1 ,ssIg

that is probably true, but perhaps the
wdy to solve the problem is to let It
and time work together for a solution.
Spring arrivals. Imported Caps.
Tweeds and Heringbone, $3.50. Davis
Toggery Shop, 119 S. Main St.-Adv.

!"

i

I

Hee Anyplace
Eat at Rex's
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
N ear~tate' And Packard

Time1"

Picture to yourself your own fresh-
man impressions. Perhaps you walk-
ed across the diagonal one fine morn-
ing with a chance upperclass ac-
quaintance of yours and you were as-
tonished at the number of people he
seemed to know. You were duly im-
pressed. "He must be a mighty big
man around here," you said, and then
you began to bow and do him rever-
ence also.

EI ILLIAMENORRIS
EDITH TALIAFERRO

Direct from the Astor Theatre, ..Y,
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES
for this New York Cast and Production

* * *

.1

Perhaps ope of Jack London's most
artistic' books is the "Star Rover." In
it he describes, rather morbidly to be
sure, the experiences of a convet who
learns the trick, when put ,into the
straightjacket, of separating his soul
from his body and of going "star rov-
ing" as the author terms it. The ad-
ventures of this convict become so en-
trancing that he purposely disobeys
in order that he may achieve freedom
through the jacket. Thit vivid story
has been transferred to the screen,
ajpearing at the Arcade today, but it
is changed and weakened so that it
may end in the usual "happily ever
after" manner. But the substance of-
fers great opportunity for scenic work
and a pleasing atmosphere which per-
vades the picture.

i
R

'-U

.__ M ,

.. .

OVERTURE

MORNING, NOON
AND
NIGHT
SUPPRE

r
,
{
.

SELECTION
6. VERDI'S
OPERA
LA PORZA
DEL DESTINO

"The Inside of the Cup," which the
Majestic displays for the latter half
of the week, is a well taken picture
with a competent . cast in support.
Winston Churchill, author of the nov-
el from which the photoplay is adapt-
ed, created a work of art which the
screen as -yet cannot reproduce, but
nevertheless though the picture does
not do justice to the book, still ,t does
justice to the movie audience, which
suffices.

:( #* *

-1

At the Arcade' on Wednesday and
Thursday Mrs. Flo Ziegfeld, nee Bil-
lie' Burke, drags forth once more
from a dusty shelf the old chorus girl
togs in "The Education of Elizabeth."
This light comedy has a good deal of
pep throughout 'and offers somnething
a bit unusual in the field in which the
mind, like a municipal bond, is, exempt

from tax.

*' * *

I

An absorbing melodrama entitled
"The Bait" is offered by Maurice Tour-
neur at the Arcade for the last two
days of the week. A young actress
who is constantly gaining greater
popularity fqr her able portrayals,
Hope Hampton,I plays the leading
role, and she is supported by the cus-
tomary well picked cast of the Tour-
neur productions. Crooks, master
minds, lions, and millionaires grace
the scenes alternately, with a grip-
ping story to weave the action togeth-
er into what forms a worth-while pic-
ture.

A

w.

* * *

I

"Kissing Time," a melody play with
a delightful score by Ivan ,Caryll is
scheduled for a week's run at -the Shu-
bert-Detroit theatre beginning today.
This drama deals with the romantic
ideas of an elderly Parisian banker
who insists that all his employees
must be married before they are eli-
gible for promotion. Consequently
the clerks arrange to have wives
whenever it is necessary to display
them, and the trouble begins when the
banker falls in love with the supposed
wife of one of his men. At the Gar-
rick today the musical comedy "Irene"
commences a two weeks' engagement.
This show has music which ranks
with that of any of the musical pro-
ductions of last year, while the plot
is one of great appeal.
On Saturday evening, the Whitney
presents David Belasco's successful
melodrama of' the Canadian North-
west entitled "Tiger Rose." The
scenic and lighting effects in this
show are extremely realistic and well
set up, while the plot .is one which
requires real emotional acting.

l
i
i
I

S

- mE

15
K

yA

fI

q 7

SIP

NORMA

r

TA

TALMADGE

t

"The

Branded

WOMa

This is the story of a girl who
is forced to the very brink of
the 'rabyss from which no
woman ever escapes and of
what happens when her hus-
band learnss the truth.

k

~ ' ,- rr

1

TODAY AND TOMORROW

L

l

CODDWYNN COMEDY
",THEY'RE OFF

4 .

N'

TUESDAY

MADE KENNEDY

In

BRUCE SCENIC

HANK MANN
In
"Clifi Dwellers"

The "she" of the story is mischievous BEBE DANIELS, the heartbroken bridegroom THE 'VERY
is Walter Hiers, the funniest fat man on the screen, and the picture is a comedy that LATEST
will bring tears of laughter to every eye in this city. FOX NEWS

"THE TRUTH"

"Falling Waters"

p '.. .

1

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