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February 27, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TI

HIGAN

DAILY

wllwTI IGAN D ILY/- ~~ II

niversities A ttack
dancing; Michigan
1ase One Of ftanvi

appear in stage tights if she chose,
and probably no charges would he
filed against her. But it simply isn't
a desirable procedure, and the girl
who goes beyond the conservative
bounds of convention is making her-
self disgusting to a large number of
people and is laying herself liable to
unnecessary and often-times unjust,
criticism."

signally upon the life of the periods,
as is exemplified in the literature of
the day . Thus, the England of Crom-
well was steeped in a Puritanism
which our prospective "Blue-Laws"
could hardly hope to surpass, while
the Restoration of 1660, throwing off
entirely the pained sobriety of the two
past decades, gaveitself over to a
reign of revelry and almost unre-

prophesied. But it did not occur-it
will not occur now. There are so
many questions, really vital to the fu-
ture of the country with which we
might be spending our time that it
seems a pity the country should be-
come panic-stricken over such a
question as the morality or immoral-
ity of modern dancing. Long, low
and solemn beats out the rhythm of
the universe, unconscious of the tur-

bulations whch excite the souls of
worthy reformers who shudder to the
syncopation of modern "jazz," but is
there one iof us who will believe the
spasms of the "shimmie" an earth-
quake, that will upset the founda-
tions of America?
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann arbor's buyers.--Adv

- - - W -p r/ W - r 4 -
(Continued fri
Lan'R right shoulder." An inter-
f ten inches must. also be main-
I between the dancers.
Ten Inches-Too Far
the West Point style is evident-
t meeting with the approval of
f Oregon University's students,
ness a communication signed
of the common herd" which
s out that under crowded condi-
of dance floors, the system will
ipossible, since the ten inches
red between partners will neces-
considerable additional floor
. He also claims that music
be changed to allow for dancing
s position. "The idea of a man's
around the lady's waist presents
er interesting phase," the stu-
goes on to say, "Any good danc-
io has had five or six years ex-

Can't Place Blame
"Who is to blame?" questions the
r'm Page One) Brown Herald editorially, in speaking
Page ne) tnts-of the coifntry-wide era of frivolity.
perience in the art can give interest- "Is it what we call the 'emancipation
ing testimony to the effect that this of women with its freedom from chap-
is the most awkward hold ever in- o nage n creas ed macy betheen
vented."eronage, increased intimacy between
the sexes in adolescence and a more
"The Daily Texan," official publica- tolerant view' toward unclean things?
tion of the University of Texas, makes Are the girls causing it now, or is it
its contribution to the general collec- the men? Probably each sex will
tion of reformist material in the form blame the other and perhaps botb are
of an editorial entitled "Knees." The equally at fault."
writer claims that one posting him- And yet are both at fault, or is
self on the university campus will it simply the spirit of the times?
soon become convinced that knees are To lay the blame for what reform-
the most important thing in# life. He ers claim to be a lowering of mor-
scores short skirts and in a really al standards at the feet of anything
sane closing paragraph he states his so vague and general as the spirit
views on the subject. "There is no of the times will doubtless be im-
desire to advocate Puritanical dress mediately denounced as "passing the
-far from it . . . There is nothing buck." But is it? History teaches us
particularly criminal or particularly that different eras have given rise to
wrong about a girl's assuming what- quite pronounced and distinctive hu-
ever costume she desires. She mightmours whch have had their effect very

JA

stricted pleasure.
Of course, it may be argued that
these successive periods of what
Mathew Arnold would doubtless term
"Hebraism and Hellenism" were mere-
ly a reflection of the tendencies of the
leaders who dictated the thought of
the times. But in a larger sense, the
extreme era of pleasure which fol-
lowed the Restoration was simply a
reaction to the restrictions of Puri-
tanism. And doubtless there were oth-
er reformers in those days-worthy
men and women who felt that in the
"toddle" and "shimmie" of the Res-
toration times was spelled the down-
fall of young manhood and young
womanhood.
No Need for Alarm
But the English nation appears to
have successfully withstood the de-
moralization of a time of freedom.
Almost two centuries and a half have
passed over the heads of the Stuart
kings, yet Britain still stands. Such
periods of apparent revelry as that of
the present day are the more or less
natural outgrowth of some great in-
ternal change and as such, they must
run their courses. Reform move-
ments, of course, will have their ef-
fect, yet time itself is the only cure
for such ills-if ills they be-as those
which beset us in the present day.
It is hard to believe the time to be
as bad as it is painted. At its worst,
however, it is simply the reaction to
the war, and if at times, the necessary
adjustment to new conditions and
standards appears a trifle hectic, It
must be remembered that the war
changed many things-that the era
of the "toddle" and the "shmmie" will
not be permanent-and that before
many months have passed, changes
will come of their own accord. What
they will be, it is, not for anyone to
prophesy. They may bring better, or
they may bring worse times than
those of today, but at least, they will
be the natural solution of the prob-
lem-nothing else will suffice.
Will Meet Old Fate
But at all events, why raise such a
commotion over such unessentials as
the "toddle" and "shimmie"? Most of
us remember the "turkey-trot," the
"bunny-hug," the "Texas-tommy" and
so on-they had their era of publicity
and the downfall of the country was
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. DivIsion

Ii
TODAY'SCHURCHSERVICESI
e n 5 CHURCH OF CHRIST
Cr DISCIPLES
Cor. Cathferine and Divlslon Sts.
South University Ave.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector F. P. ARTHUR, PASTOR
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M.,- Holy Communion.
10:30 A. M. - Holy Communion 10:30 A. M.-Sermon, "Missions
and Sermon by the Rev. John and the Church."
M. Groton, Rector of the
Church of Our Saviour, Jen-
kintown, Pa., "God's View of 7:30 P. M. -- Mrs. P. A. Sher-
Human Effort." man, a missionary from India,
4:30 P. M. - Evening Prayer will conduct the service.
and Sermon by the Rev. John
M. Groton, "The Way of 9:30 A. M. - Bible School.
Peace."
ANN ARBOR FIRST
BIBLE CHAIR BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
Headquarters in Lane Hall. J. M. WELLS, M] NISTER
321 East Ann Street
Classes meet in the "Upper
Room." 10:30 A..M. - Morning Worship.
Organ Prelude begins at 10:25.
Upper Room Bible Class Sat- John Mason- Wells will preach.
utrday evenings. University on "A GreatChallenge."
Men's Bible Class Sunday 12:00 Noon - Sunday School.
Guild Class: "Hstory and Lit-
Ask for printed circular an- erature of the Hebrew Pee-
nouncing six courses. ple."
Men's Forum: "The Theatre
Read the Upper Room Bulletin. and Censorship."
THOMAS M. IDEN, 6:30 P. M.-Prof. J. L. Markley
Instructor. speaks on "Baptist Dynamics."
If_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

e+

0

{

STARTING TODAY

1doWsorOtherwise,
iomen Just Scared
im to Death! .
qonder he ran out of breath
ten one fat Diana pursued him.
I scared the shy artist to "death"
e dodge the large goddess who wooed hime.
w were th'e models-the dears
7hose&glorious beauty had lured him.
"died"-had a funeral with tears;
ut then two strange widows secured hin.
wished h' had never "died,"
or whereever he turned was-a wife,
I though to escape them he tried-
He Couldn't Come lack

'.7F

ii

F
p

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
CORNER HURON AND DIVISION

0

The Sixth Sense "
by the Pastor

to "Life!!,
t 9e

s

12:00 Noon - Prof. W. D. Henderson will lead the student class this
semester. He will speak on "Men and Women of the
Bible." Everyone welcomed.
4:00 P. M. - Vesper Services. The choir will render Mendelssohn's
"Hear My Prayer," led by George Oscar Bowen.
6:30 P. M. - The Student Volunteers will lead the Young People's
meeting.

rrymore s

Greatest

characterization.

"All

e laughs you like.

Sunday services at 10:30 A.M.
Subject, "Christ Jesus." Testi-
monial meeting, Wednesday ev-
ening at 7:30. A cordial invita-
tion is extended to all. Sunday
School at 11:45 A. M., to which
pupils underA20 years maydbe
admitted. A public reading
room, 236 Nickels Arcade, is
open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 12 to 5 o'clock.

:=

::::::::::=

I

mmmmmd

--- :
-._.._.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.I., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director

F

,.! (Airl

ZION LUTHERAN
ONURCH
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
120 Packard Street

I

10:30
12:00
6:00
6:30

A. M.
Noon.
P. M.
P. M.

Sunday, February 27, 1921
"The Heart of Lent," Pastor's Subject.
Bible School. Six New Classes.
Social Half Hour for the young people.
Wesleyan Guild- Devotional Meeting.
Mr. Leslie Bettison, Leader.
Wesleyan Guild Lecture. BISHOP THOMAS NICHOL-
SON. "IS CHRISTIANITY TO BE THE FINAL RE-
LIGION OF HUMANITY?"

7:30 P. M.

Whir man lennett's person-
ally superkised production,
adapted from Arnold Ven-
nett ' bit-'o-ivit, "The Great
A dventure."

"However hard the trial, let
us pray for sifting, if only we
can learn the lesson Peter learn-
ed,-if only we can be saved
from the failure and regret
which follows confidence in
self."
10:30 A. M. - "The Highest
Moral Principle."
7:30 P. M. - "Peter, the Self-
confident Apostle."
Both services in English.
UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minsiter.
February 27, 1921
10:40 A. M.-"Two Presidents."
A thought of recognition, of
backward and forward look,
in connection with Inaugura-
- tion Day, March 4.
5:45 P. M. - Social Hour.
6:30 P. M. - Forum of Reli-
gon. Prof. A. E. Wood will
give us a Sociologist's view
of some ethical problems.
All Seats are Free

i

EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION

Special Music for the Day.-"Build thee more stately mansions"
(Andrews), the Chorus; "But the Lord is Mindful of'His Own" (from
St. Paul) (Howe), Contralto Solo; "I will lay'me down" (Dorey), the
Chorus; "Oh Divine Redeemer" (Gounod), Soprano Solo.
SPECIAL INVITATION TO ALL STUDENTS

t

Ade sarry
And the Follies Girls

in

Ar.Fatima"
A Christie Comedy

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
MORNING WORSHIP
10:30
The miister speaks:
REACTIONS TO REDEMPTION
University Religious Forum at 12:00.
The last of the series of talks on: "How a Man May
Express His Christianity Through His Profession"
will be given by Dr. C. G. Parnall. His subject is:
"How a Man May Express His Christianity Through
the Medical Profession."
W At 6:30 Miss Muza M. Rice will speak upon the subject:
"Why I am Choosing Medicine as a Profession."

It sets a new mark for laughs at college boys pranks
TOPICS - CARTOONS - ORCHESTRA
COMING FOR FOUR DAYS STARTING WEDNESDAY

INSTONS CHURCHILL'S
mous novel that made the world
up and gap.

"The Inside of The upi"
A story that turns the dregs of life into the sparkftng wine of happiness

. _.

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