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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T

ICHIGAN DAILY

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
ublished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
ear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
ntered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
nbscription by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
ffices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
hones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
ommunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nnot necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
ion of the Editor, if :'eft at or mailed to The Daily office.
ned ommunications will receive no consideration. No man-
it will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
d in the communications.
What's Going On""notices will nt be received after 8 o'clock
eevening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR ...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Editors- . W.Hitchcock
T. H. AdamE e~m
B. P. Campbell J. E .cant s .
J. I. Dakin.T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud SherwoodJ
y Editor ..... ... ....-- .--.-- .-.. A. Berstein
als.............. Lee Woodruff, L. A. ] ern, '1'. J. Whinery
a.nt News........ ............--...-.-- -E P. LovejoyJr'
..... ........ ..................Robert Angell
n's ditr..... .................... Mary D. Lane
'aph .......... ............- -............ Vest Gallogly
ope ..........-.............,....Jack W. Kelly
Assistant
ine Waldo Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Kiaver
s. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E" R. Meiss
eth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Clark Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
Reindel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
y Monfort J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
B. Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
S Oberholtzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
tE. Adams J. W. Hlume, Jr. Sara Waller
L. Stone Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
NIESS MANAGER ...-.....LEGRAND t.:GAINESJR.
t~sing~ ~...~..~................ ...D P. Joyce
eds. ............ ....................Robt. O. Kerr
ation.. ........ ........ ................. M. Heath
nts....................... -..... . R. Priehs
.tion..........,..... .......... '... ..V. F. Hillery
Assistants
Lambrecht P, H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
Gower F. A. Crass R. C. Stearnes
nd Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L.iRice
W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
aurel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

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Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
te of 'h , Daily shouldZee the night editor, who has full charge
11 news to be printed that night. t
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN I. DAKIN.
WHO WANTS ETERNAL LIFE?
according to the Detroit Daily Times, Dr. Eu-
e Lyman Fiske, a biologist of note, has come
ward in an article for the Yale Review in which
claims that before long human life will be pro-
ged 'to a two thousaid year span.
n disposing of the problems introduced by such
gevity, the good Dr. Fiske shows tremendous
igiative powers. Hie would control the birth-
e by determbiningsex; put the surplus of popula-
a to death by lot; and when the numbers become
large to be disposed of in this way, he would
pose of the extras by shooting them to other
nets in specially constructed torpedoes. Any
'rsupply of females would be overcome in the
l by a wholesale slaughter, because, the Doctor
vely explains, their biological value would be at
end. Perhaps Doctor Fiske believes that woman,
money, is the root of all evil and that she is
rated solely because she is necessary for the
petuation of the species.
?ossibly the reporter who wrote up the story and
interview had just had a shot of hop and mis-
ted right and left. .Perhaps we are hopelessly
ctionary and iconoclastic toward scientific spec-
tion of the unshackled variety here exhibited. At
- rate we wish to go on record here and now as
:ing that we do not want to live for two thousand
.rs, we don't want to exist so long that all of o r
sions are destroyed, and we hate to contemplate
possibility 6f'an exclusively nasculine world..
lere's hoping for death before eternal life ap-
rs upon this mortal sphere.
THE FEMALE FIGHT FAN
tev. Dr. John RoachStraton, pastor of the Cal-
y Baptist church of New York City, is evi-
tly a member of that Puritanically-minded order
ch has been responsible for the "blue laws" agh
on. And the Reverend Doctor has lately re-
red a shock which bids fair to be the worst of
career. Women have attended a prize fight in
v York City. Think of it. Have' really been
sent at a prize fight, and what is even more
-niing and degrading, have allowed their names
> affixed to statements appearing in "the public
its" actually glorifying the spectacle which they
aessed.
nd Dr. Straton bewails this freedom which is
ig exercised by the women of New York as "a
'ible thing." One can well imagine the gentle-
i when news of the dastardly affair was brought
is attention. Doubtless he hs never been pres-
at a prize-fight.. One would be surprised to find
: he had ever witnessed a boxing match, and
id believe him to be the sort who would raise
hands in horror at the spectacle of two urchins
:he street fighting out their battles at fisticuffs,
afterwards being as good or better friends than
are:
ust why should prize fighting be forced to re-.
n without the pale of decent sport? Certainly
e is no art which is more manly than that of ac-
'ing the ability to defend oneself at boxing, 7,d

the mere fact that prize fights.are boxing matches
held for money should not render them so very
much' different from matches staged merely for
glory and honor.
During the war, boxing was held to be one. of
the most important phases of the training of each
recruit, and considerable spirit and feeling was
aroused among the different contingents through
boxing matches which were held.
The war changed many things. Can we clot be-
lieve that it may have brought forth a higher stand-
ard in womanhood, the long-heralded, New Woman,
the girl who would glory with the man in his
triumphs, physical as well as mental, and whose
mind would be above seeking the -only element in
the prize fight which Dr. Straton sees, that she was
watching "two practieylly naked men battering and
bruising each other."
NEEDED: AN ART COMBINE
Although there is at Michigan no separate art
school where one may receive instruction in actual
painting ad drawing and also take tip the study of
art works from an appreciate and constructive view-
point, we have courses in both the literary and en-
gineering colleges which, if combined, would form a
department which might be of high ultimate benefit
to all students interested either directly or indirectly
in art work.
In the literary college we have classes in fine
arts under Professor Cross which have always been
recognized for their value in giving tie student a
better knowledge of the fundamental characteris-
tics of the art of the past and present. In the arch-
itecture college we have a series of subjects offered
to architects and lits alike, which teach free-hand
and architectural drawing and painting, and mod-
eling as well. In the former department we can
develop 'our appreciation of the fine things in all
types of art; we can, by following up the short
list of subjects offered therein, learn much of
the basic standards of drawing, painting, and sculp-
ture. On the other hand, a knowledge of the actual
technique of the work itself can be gained only
from such viork as that offered in the college of
architecture.
These types of courses go hand in hand. A com-
bination of the two into a single department of fine
arts would not be an art school, but it would be a
long step in the right direction and should not only
do much toward increasing the sense of artistic a-
preciation among the students but would make it
more attractive for students to come here and pur-
sue a course in art study and practice along with
their other college work.
The suggestion is not an impracticable one and
should not make necessary any great amount of re-
construction. If such a department were organ-
ized it would be a sound basis upon which a school
of art might finally be built up.
Dr. George Callen, a phylogenist of Brooklyn,
now gives us the statement that the site of the
Garden of Eden w, in Ohio. All of which must
be a blow .to every enraptured native son of the
Golden Poppy state.
Skating Gets Credit at Montana University.
- Headline.
One course they ought to be able to get cold.
Slide through it, so to speak.
The Telescope
Quite Right'
When asked, "What is a crazy bone ?"
He answered, his head in a whirl,
"A crazy boneis, to my mind,
A dollar spent on a college girl."
How to Be the Life of the Party
LESSON v
The purpose of these lessons is to enable a man
to acquit himself creditably not only in the draw-
ing room but wherever he may chance to be. Thus

the following lesson is intended primarily for the
dinner table. A
It may thus be 'that you do not find the biscuit,
for instance, to your liking. Haling told the
boarding-house keeper so, she may reply a little
caustically:
"Young enan, I want you to know I made these
biscuits before you were born."
At her words allow the doubt and bewilderment
to vanish from your face and reply in the tone of
on on whom enlightenment has suddenly dawned:
"Well, wl, that explains the whole thing."
Then as the thunderous applause of the rest of
the boarders becomes a deafening din, suddenly
pull from your pocket a silk handkerchief and del.-
icately blow your nose. (The situation by this time
is pretty delicate so this will simply mean acting
natufal.)
When somebody, finally notices about the hand-
kerchief, remark in an offhand.manner that it cost
you $3.00. And then when the star boarder greets
this announcement with the comment that that's a
lot of money to pay for a handkerchief, reply non-
chalantly:
"You're right; that's really a lot of money to
blow in."
And after that all you have to do is to make some
remark about the weather and you can be assured
of a hearty guffaw.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm taking up my Cross," said the stude as he
picked up his English history textbook and started
for class. NOAH COUNT.

.1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Armor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. mi., and
12:10 p.m.

WINDOW SHADES

PICTURE FRAMING

Student Headquarters
We carry complete stocks of "Brighten-Up" finishes In small size
cans for all "touch-upr' jobs around the house.
PAINTS TARNISHES BRUSHES WALL PAPER
ENAMELS KALCIMINES STAINS GLASS

I

L. E. WENZEL

_

I

Painting and Decorating

J

FEBRUARY
S M T W T
1 2 3
6 7 8 9 10
13 14 15 16 17
20 21 22 23 24
27 28

S

F S
4 5
11 12
18 19
25 w26

ANN ARBOR PHONE 84
207 EAST LIBERTY

YPSILANTI PHONE 171
114 PEARL

A

1

I

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all no3w trimmings'
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you Il'e to te$t
dollars. We do only -high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

I

THE BANK OF SERVICE
Comimercial Banking in all its Branches.
Savings Department and Safety Deposit Vaults.
Exchange on All Parts of the World.
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks.

.

I

A COMPLETE LINE OF.-DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
GRAHAM'S

TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
A Nice Cozy Place Where
You Enjoy Your Meal
One half block South
of "MAJ"

1-,

Both,

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
101-103 So. Main St. 330 So. State St., (Nickels Arcade)
Member of the Federal Reserve System.
a

-

1~
T VERY
plate
leaps
filament glo
cox Edison fir;
called the "I

How is"aWireless
Message Received?
i incandescent lamp has a filament. Mount a metal
on a wire in the lamp near the filament. A current
the space between the filament and the plate when the
WS.
st observed this phenomenon in 1883. Hence it was
Edison effect."

= , b -'
'
" 'a

k

Scientists long studied the "effect" but they could not explain
it satisfactorily. Now, after years of experimenting with' Crookes
tubes, X-ray tubes and radium, it is known that the current that
leaps across is a stream of "electrons"- exceedingly minute particles
negatively charged with electricity.
These electrons play an important part in wireless communica-
tion. When a wire grid is interposed between the filament and the
plate and charged positively, the plate is aided in drawing elec'trons
across; but when the grid is charged negatively it drives back the elec-
trons. A very small charge applied to the grid, as small' as that ae-
' ceived from a feeble wireless wave, is enough to vary the electron
stream.
So the grid in the tube enables a faint wireless impulse to controf
the very much greater amount of energy in the flow of electrons, and
so radio signals too weak to be perceived by other means become per-
ceptible by the effects that they produce. Just as the movement of
a throttle controls a great locomotive in motion, so a wireless wave,
by means of the grid, affects the powerful electron stream.
All this followed from studying the mysterious "Edison effect"-
a purely scientific discovery.
No one can foresee what results will follow from research in pure
. science. Sooner or later the world must benefit practically from the
discovery of new facts.
For this reason the Research Laboratories of the General Electric
Company are concerned as much with investigations in pure science
as they are with the improvement of industrial processes and products.
They, too, have studied the "Edison effect " scientifically. The result
has been a new form of electron tube, known as the "pliotron", a type
of X-ray tube free from the vagaries of the old tube; and the "kene-
tron", which is called by electrical engineers a "rectifier" because it
has the property of changing an alternating into a direct current.
All these improvements followed because the Research Labora-
tories try to discover the "how" of things. Pure science always
justifies itself.
General Office SchenePtady,N.Y.

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