100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGI

..-.

y ...
" 4
.,. p i
"r 1
,,
. "
. .
" i . y
t ' ' O ® 1 t " / iC aky
SS V nA nA
;; /, F
L
i " Q
C70W

MICHIGAN FAIS
Varsity Out After Revenge for T
Defeats from M. A. C.
Last Year
GILKEY IS SCORING STAR
OF QUINTET FROM LANSI
Revenge will be sought by t
Michigan basketball team at 7:
o'clock tonight for the two defe
which the Michigan Aggie quin
handed the Wolverines last year. Af
two clean victories over Conferen
teams reputed as the best, the Mic
gan five is set for tonight's batt
which is expected to be a hard fig
from start to finish.
Need Early Start
To overcome the Aggie~ quin
Mather's men will have to be goi
their best and early in the game w
have to stop the Aggie off ensi
which, if once started, will be m
difficult to stop. It is the brillia
scoring achine of the visitors, bu
around Gilkey, that Mather fea
most, but he is hoping by close gua
ing to forestall them and to get t
jump on the Aggies.
By their decisive defeat of No
Dame early ine the week, M. A.
stands out as a powerful team.
is practically a veteran combinati
that comes here tonight, and t
playing experience gained togeth
during the past three years will a
them greatly in the contest tonig:
During the past week Coach Math
has been sending his men throu,
hard workouts for this game, and
has been drilling them in a defen
especially designed to stop theI
A. C. five. In the practices the qui
tet'has been showing the same sti
that won from Conference leaders.
Regular Lineup Tonight
Determined to continue their wi
ning steak, the Wolverines feel th
they cannot give up the presti
gained recently, by losing to t
Farmers, and will offer the visitors
real battle. Probably the regul
line-up will start tonight. Capta
Karpus and Miller at forwards, Dun
center, and Rea and Williams, guar
will undoubtedly be Coach Mathe
choice, although Whitlock and L
Galley may be injected into the fra
Yesterday afternoon Bud Rea w
practicing shots from the center
the floor, and the regularity wi
which he caged the ball shows that:
will continue his work .of the Pu
due and Chicago games. By this tir
the short pass game of the Wolverin
Is working almost perfectly, and wi
any luck at all Michigan should w
tonight.
ENTHUSIASM IN WRESTLING
INCREASING AT MICIGA
Wrestling enthusiasm has been i
creasing by leaps and bounds for t
past two months, according to Dr.
A. May. Every afternoon a lar
number of ambitious grapplers wo
out in the wrestling room of Wate
man gymnasium.
Present plans call for a tourn
ment soon after the opening of t
second semester. Competition will 1
held in seven weights. All those w]
desire to enter are urged to weigh
with Doctor May as soon as poss
ble. Those who survive the preli
inares in the tournament will aut
matically qualify themselves to pa
ticipate in the election of a captain.
In order to arouse greater intere

in and appreciation of the sport o
the campus it is planned to put o
a wrestling bout between the halve
of the Purdue basketball game, Fel
28. The principals for this encounte
have not been selected as yet, but
fast match is promised.
'FRATERNITY STEWARDS
To fraternity and sorority
stewards:
Many Michigan athletes are in
need of work. It may be that
you will need men to work either
in your dining room or kitchen.
If so call Hammon'd, phone 188,
so that athletes may be given
these jobs.

WILL HOLD BOXING BOUT BE-
TWEEN HALVES OF AGGIE GAME
Sanction of a boxing bout between
D. D. Dodge, '24, and M. A. Mills,
'23E, to be staged between halves at
the M. A. C. basketball game, has been
given by the Board of Boxing Con-
trol consisting of Registrar Arthur G.
Hall, Dr. G. A. May, Coach Sullivan,
Roland Libonati, '21, and Charles
Hummer, '23.
The bout will extend over three two
minute rounds. Coach Sullivan will
referee while Libonati and Hummer
he will act as time keepers.
30
ats S
tt Sport Echoes
'ter
ce University of California
hi- Should the University of Caliornia's
le, crew defeat the crew of the University
;ht of Washington this coming spring
I when the two eights meet in a regatta,
the California oarsmen will come east
tet to row againsttPrinceton on June 10.
ing In that case the Californians would
'ill also participate in the Poughkeepsie
ve, regatta on June 22, and other meets
ost which will be held in the East.
tnt
ilt Atlanta, Ga.
Irs At a meeting to be held in Atlanta
d- Feb. 25 and 26, of representatives of
he the leading colleges and universities
of the South, the organization of a
re Southeirn Athletic conference along
C. the lines of the Western Conference
it will be proposed. Other matters to be
on discussed will be all phases of pro-
he fessionalism and the migration of ath-
er letes from one school to another. Steps
id will be taken to prevent both of these
ht. practices.
er
gh Chicago
he In the absence of snow, members of
se the Chicago football squad will work
M. out all winter: Mild weather prompt-
n- ed Coach Stagg 'to call out the grid-
iron men for more exercise and he will
keep them busy all year round if the
weather will permit. Coach Stagg
at plans on devoting the regular spring
practice to the forward pass. Because
ge, Chicago will lose seven letter men
he and because the Maroons will have a
a heavy schedule, which will include
iar two intersectional games, the Old Man
in is going to hold the men all year.
ne Chicago will go to Princeton to take
, n the Tigers and will meet the Uni-
r's versity of Colorado in the Windy City.
y. These two teams are considered
asy among the strongest in their respective
of sections of the country.
hth Minnesota
he An informal hockey team has been
r- organized at theUniversity of M-
ne nesota. Plans are now under way to
es present . to the university athletic
th board of control a petition to have
in hockey recognized as a collegiate
sport. Efforts are also being made to
interest other Conference schools in
order to arrange games.
N A move to revive baseball this com-
ing year is also receiving serious at-
n- tention. Students are anxious to
he place a team in the Western Confer-
G. ence race for 1921. A petition re-
ge questing the reestablishment of the
rk game at Minnesota is being circulated
r- on the campus. The game was abol-
ished at the university in 1916.
he Patronize Daily advrtseru.-Adv.
be
ho

ADOCTE FEWER EVENTS
FO0R PREP ,TRACK ME N
Curtailment of the number of
events in which athletes of prep
schools compete in interscholastic
meets is advocated by a committee of
the Association of College Track
Coaches of America, of which Coach
S. J. Farrell and Archie Hahn are
active members.
For several years Michigan has
been strongly urging the adoption of
such a rule according to P. G. Bar-
telme, athletic director. The commit-
tee report follows:
That the members of this associa-
tion use their influence with their re-
spective institutions to prevent the
boys of the preparatory schools from
competing in too many events in the
various interscholastic meets to be
held in the future. The committee aft-
er careful deliberation in this matter
recommends the following sugges-
tions :
Recommended that no schoolboy be
permitted to run in more than one
event above and including the quar-
ter mile. Below the quarter mile, and
including the quarter mile, he will be
permitted to run in two events. The
two mile run is to be dropped from
all. interscholastic competition. Re-
lay races to be dropped from all in-
terscholastic track meets, where the
regular order of events are held. No
restrictions on the competition in
field events, except judgment should
be exercised by the school authori-
ties and coaches. Hurdle races are
classed as running events. A heat in
a quarter mile is classed as one race.
This association contains in its
membership the most prominent track
coaches of the country. Represented
are John F. Moakley, president of the
association and recent coach of the
Olympic team, Keane FitzpatrickI
Princeton mentor and e formerly at
Michigan, A. A. Stagg, Chicago, Law-
son Robertson, Penn ylvania, K. K.
Rockne, Notre Dame, and H. W. Ma-
loney, Leland Stanford.
Learn Shorthand and Typewriting
next semester. Hamilton Business
College. State and William Sts.-Adv.

PPOOR ICE STOPS
HOCKEY CONTEST
Poor ice conditions last night broke
in upon the informal hockey squad's
schedule for the third consecutive
time. The game which was to have
been played at the Coliseum against
the Varsity News sextet of Detroit
was postponed early yesterday after-
noon when it became evident that
there would be no ice. No date has
been definitely arranged for this en-
counter.
Last night's cancellation will not
affect the game with the Detroit
Waterstons, scheduled for 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon at the Coliseum, unless;
the continued warm weather makes
the match impractical, according to
Manager Fletcher.
UNION BASKET QUINTET WINS
ORGANIZATION RACE TITLE
Coming from behind in the last half
to overcome a 9 to 6 score, the Michi-
gan Union basketball team defeated
the Upstaters 20 to 12, in the con-
cluding game of2the intramural tour-
ntment Thursday night. Hickey was
the bright star for the winners, reg-
istering three field goals and four out
of five foul throws in the last half.
With the conclusion of the inter-
fraternity and sectional series inter-
est is turning to the interclass tour-
ney, which will be started at the be-
ginning of the new semester. With
more than 100 men in good condition
as a result of the intramural play
the interclass series is expected to de-
velop some teamni faster than the
aevrage has been in the past.
Alpha Sigma Phi won the champion-
ship in the interfraternity series by
taking the deciding game from Sigma
Alpha Epsilon earlier in the week.
Have you company' coming? Bring
them to Teet's Dining Rooms for din-
ner.-Adv.
Learn Shorthand and Typewriting
next semester. Hamilton Business
College. State and Willian Sts.-Adv.
After the dance you are invited to
the Chinese Gardens.-Adv.
Daily advertising will spell prosper-
ity for you.-Adv.

CLASS COURT LEAGUE
TARTS FEBRUARY 21
WILL ORGANIZE TWO LEAGUES
TO PRO'4ONG
SERIES
Interclass basketball will make its
first appearance this season immedi-
ately after the new semester begins
Feb. 21. This league will be the in-
tramural basketball classic of the
year. During the first part of this
season Coach Mitchell, of the Intra-
mural office, arranged the intramural
athletic program so that fraternity

and departmental games were 1
only ones played. This was done
order that there would be a lar
number of men on the campus w
would be in playing condition.
present there are about 150 men in 1
University who have been playing bf
ketball on various teams during I
past two months. From this numi
the class teams will receive the bi
of their material and consequently I
games shoild prove to 'be close
fought.
(Continued on Page Six)
Craftsmen's Club Dance at Barba
Gym, Monday, Feb. 21, 9 to 1. Sp(
ial music by Rhodes Orchestra.I
Masons invited. Tickets at Treasui
Campbell's office.--Adv.

largest Oil Wells
in the United States

Expected in Duval

County, Texas

--- - -

NOW
"6The

OPEN
Cast-le"l

THE ORIGINAL HOME OF
HOME COOKES MEALS
STATE St. at HILL St.
Especially Careful Service for
Particular People
SWAIN

SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Jan. 22-l
Duval county, Texas, which has'
been in the limelight more or less
for about a year is now scheduled
for a period of intensive activity,
according to geologists who have
just returned from the field.
The famous Becher No. 1, Em-
pire test on the Becher farm, be-
ing drilled by the Empire Gas and,
Fuel company north of the town;
of Benavides has never been aban-
doned, as it is generally believed,
and operations are again under
way on this important test, which
flowed a good grade of oil and pro-
duced considerable gas at a depth
of about 3300 feet, after which the
Empire company erected a 42,000-,
gallon steel tank.
The following are some of the
companies interested in the devel-
opment of Duval county:
Empire Gas and Fuel company,
Mar-Tex, Abercrombie, Tex-Lar Oil
company, Ark-Tex Oil . company,
National Oil company, the Danci-
ger Oil and Refining company of
Kansas City, 'Missouri, the Simms
Oil company of Houston, Texas and
the Gray Ridge Oil company
Several of the most experienced
geologists and petroleum engineers
of the California oil fields have
made a careful survey of the Du-
val county field, propounce it the
most promising territory in the
Gulf coast district and predict the
opening up of a new field as large,
or larger than any yet brought in
in Texas.
Rigs Moving In
Although the field has been look-
ed upon favorably by the large
companies for the past year, as'
evidenced by the fact that they
have practically all blocked up
considerable acreage, they have
been so busily engaged in other
proven fields that they were un-
able to turn their attention to this
particular one. With the slowing
up of activities in the North Texas
fields, however, rigs and men have
been released from those centers
and a number of the well estab-
lished companies are shifting them
to Duval county in an effort to
prove it up.
There has been much drilling
near Pedras Pintas near Benavides
and many wells are on the pump
and producing a high grade of oil.
Deep drilling is done around the
salt domes which produce very
large production.
Structures are Promising
Aside from the salt dome prom-
ise of production, the northern part
of the county is just as promising
from a structural point of view.
The drilling of the Mar-Tex No. 1
on the Ridder lease, disclosed a
well defined structure which gave
excellent indications of produc-
tion. The Yegua sands, which
have proven productive in other
Texas fields, are also found in this
field and in addition other shal-

lower sands were encountered
which gave good promise of being
productive. The Yegua sand is
picked up at about '1700 feet as
was the case in the Mar-Tex No. 1.
Geologists claim that on account
of the live oil found in the Empire
test, has est.lished beyond a
doubt, that a pool exists in that vi-
cinity and that every geologist
who has made a survey of Duval
county is of the opinion that such
a pool will be tapped.
Conditions in Duval County are
similar to conditions prevalent
around the largest wells in the
Gulf Coast region around the salt
domes and all geologists who have
gone into the matter, agree that
,similar wells will be brought in
around the salt domes of Duval
county, which is just now getting
so many test wells.
REPORT OF THE GEOLOGIST OF
THE INVADER OIL & RE-
FINING' CO. OF TEXAS.
"It is my firm belief-and this
belief is shared by a large num-
ber of other experienced and far-
seeing oil men-that the greatest
high-grade oil field ever discovered
in the world will soon be opened
in South Texas. I believe this new
field will be located about 110
miles due South of San Antonio,
and will extend through Duval
County, Webb County, Jim Hogg,
Brooks and Hidalgo Counties. By
referring to a map of Texas, you
will find these counties to be lo-
cated in the very southern-most
portion of the State; in what is
generally known as the Lower Rio
Grande Valley, or the Brownsville
country.

"I

1

;I

I

,.1

I

I,

I

.

713 East Uuiversity Avenue

Phone 2312

If It's Anything Photographic, Ask Him About It

GOOD TABLES, GOOD CUES,
GOOD SERVICE
To get real enjoyment out of
a game of billiards, the equip-
ment must be top-notch.
You want good tables-sound
cushions and new, clean cloth.
You want good cues-well-bal-
anced, of the right weight, with
tips that hold the chalk.
You want good service-at-
tendants who are quick to antic-
ipate your needs.
You'll find the best of service
and equipment here. Come in
and play a game or two, today.
HUSTON BROS,
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Cigars and Candies.
Soft Drinks and Light Lunches.
Cigarettes and Pipes.
"We Try to Treat You Right"
No. 5

ESTABLISHED 18698
Wall Paper
- Paper Hanging
Interior Finishng
Enameling
Exterior Painting=
i _
Phone 353-Fl
Ti -lillH~l~liill~nnu ilillM i~llgliiililiiln

Go North from the Tampico field,
and carefully trace the same anti-
clinal structure and geological for-
mation. You will find these reach-
ing their most pronounced and
favorable outcroppings about 250
miles North of Tampico, across the
Rio Grande River, in the southern
counties of Texas, just mentioned.
Here is where I look for the
GREATEST high-grade oil wells in
the world to be found. I believe
that enormous gushers will be
struck in this field, nearly as large
as the biggest wells of Tampico.
I believe the great wells of Burk-
burnett, Ranger and Stephens
County, Texas-and of Homer and
Bull Bayou, Louisiana-will appear
small in comparison with the
mighty gushers that will be struck.
here. Furthermore, this will be
high-grade oil of the much desired
paraffin base - rich in gasoline,
kerosene and lubricants-and not
the low grade Tampico oil and as-
phaltum base.'
I hold oil leases on 6004 acres
Duval Co. lands, a part of which
I offer for immediate sale at low
prices. I can use several agents.
SAMUEL H. SMITH,
709 W. Huron St.
Phone 1438.W.
-Advertisement.

We serve dinners to parties. Teet's
Dining Rooms, 805 E. Huron St.-Adv.
Get the habit. Follow the "ones who
know" to the Chinese Gardens.-Adv.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan