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February 05, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-05

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW OR RAIN
AND COLDER TODAY

r Ak ir an

VOL. XXXI. No. 93. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENT

CANCELLTION Of,
LLINTERALLIED
DEBTSPROPOSED
BRITISH GOVERNMENT PROPOSAL
REFUSED BY AMERICA,
CLAIM
NO GAIN WANTED, SAYS
BRITISH CHANCELLOR
Stateslin Speech That England Would
Have Lost In Carrying Out
Offer Made
(By Associated Press)
Birmingham, Eng., Feb. 4. - The
British government formally proposed
a cancellation of all inter-Allied debts,
but the proposal was unacceptable to
the American government, said J. Aus-
tin Chamberlain, chancellor of the ex-
chequer, in a speech to his constitu-
ents here today.
"To make the offers again," Mr.
Chamberlain continued, "would be, I
think, beneath our dignity and would
render us liable to a misconception
of our motives."
Sought no Selfish Advantage
"In making them," he added, "we
sought no national advantage for our-
selves. We proposed a solution in
which we should have for'egone claims
larger than any remitted to us, and
weproposed it because we believed it
woild be in the ifterests.of good re-
lations amongst people, the rehabil-
itation of national credit and the re-
storation of international trade."
"Our great international debt is due
to the obligations we undertook on
behalf of our Allies. Had we only our-
selves to consider we should have been
practically free of external debts at
the present time."
Favorable to Any Plan
Mr. Chamberlain prefaced his re-
marks by saying that he would have
preferred at the close of the war that
the whole inter-Allied debt had been
wiped out, so as to start with a clean
slate. There was no proposal for the
settlement of the international debt
among the Allied and associated pow-
ers, whether for a total or partial re-
mission, with the British government
which the British government would
not have been ready to be a party to.
REORGANIZATION OF NAVAL
RESERVE TO COMMENCE SOON
Reorganization of the naval reserve
force, as was outlined by Lieut.-Com.
R. T. Broadhead at the meeting of re-
serves Thursday night, will begin aft-
er the next semester opens, accord-
ing to Russell Dodd, '21E, who has
been appointed in charge of the work
here.
The unit of the reserves which will
be organized in the University will
give men the opportunity to maintain
their efficiency, and -arrangements are
nw being made to give men work
4lgrg the line in which they are rated.
Already several men have signified
their desire to afiliate themselves
with the proposed unit here, and the
outlook for a complete organization is
said to be favorable.
Those who gre interested in the
Work, or Who wnld like to enroll for
the frst time in the reserves are ask-
ed to get in touch with Dodd at 595.
WOMEN OUTNUMBER MEN IN
TRYOUTS FOR FRENCH PLAY

Tryuts for the Cercle Francais play
44 Biourgels Gentilhomne," were held
yesterday attrnoon in the Cercle's
roolps uL4 south wing. A large num-
ber of students studying French ap-
plied, the number pf women students
far exceeding the men. - Dr. Cloppet,
pf the French department, is in charge
pf the production.

PRACTICAL WORK STRIPS TECHNICAL
COLLEGES OF SOUND FUNDAMENTALS
- PROF. J. C. PARKER

"Our obsession for engineering eco-
nomics and 'practical' courses has
wellnigh stripped the technical col-
leges of sound fundamental instruc-
tion," stated Prof. John C. Parker,
head of the electrical engineering de-
partment, referring to a letter of the
Westinghouse Electric company re-
questing engineering graduates to
take .a course of six months instruc-
tion under B. G. Lamme, chief engi-
neer of the concern.
Rare Type Wanted
The letter said, "Young men to do
the work must be of that keenly in-
telligent type who show a sense of
engineering judgment plus ability to
use the higher mathematics as a tool.
The type, we realize, is rare. Possi-
bly less than one-tenth of the grad-
uates would qualify."
Commenting on this, Professor Par-
*ker said, "I consider Mr. Lamme the
foremost engineer in America today,
and the opportunity to work under
him for a half year is worth $4,000
or $5,000 in itself.
"I regret that there are not enough
men in our February class for me to
select any as possible candidates for
the position. In fact, I do not believe
that more than a half dozen men

could be found in all the colleges of
the country who could meet the speci-
fications desired by the Westinghouse
company.
Sound Basis Lacking
"This condition of affair§ is due to
American superficiality in education-
the attempt to build a showy super-
structure without any sincere founda-
tion. When the American student
realizes the value of the fundamental
courses which will give him a sound
basis for reasoning he will be more
fit to take his place, in the world of
professional and industrial activity."
FINAL EXAMS WILL
TEXT HONOIR PLAN
Proposed System Wild Be Tried in
About 40'Literary Classes in
Next Two Weeks

I1

LEAUE SOUNDEST PLAN s
YET, SAYS PorF.Up ,A
TELLS COSMO CLUB THAT U. S.e
CANNOT AFFORD TOa
ISOLATE SELF.
"It is a self-evident fact that thet
League of Nations is the soundest
proposal yet submitted for the settle-
ment of international controversies,"''
said Prof. Robert T. Crane, professorv
of political science, in speaking beforeg
the Cosmopolitan club Friday evening 1
on the League of Nations.
Professor Crane opened his talk by0
explaining that he wished his audi- 1
ence to make the proper allowancesV
for any seemingly prejudiced state-n
ments as he had openly declared him-P
self in favor of the league, with thep
reservations which are in general de-t
manded.
Bars Hasty War
The speaker pointed out that thep
league did not conceive it possible toi
attempt to prevent war, only to As-
tablish an effective barrier to a hasty
entrance into war.t
Professor Crane declared that thel
league is founded upon entirely dif-
ferent working principles than theI
former attempts at a peace tribunal,f
namely, the Hague. This body twicer
failed because it attempted. to legis-v
late international law.
Feared Administration Change
In speaking of the attitude of the
United States toward the proposed
body, the speaker declared that this
country cannot afford to isolate her-
self politically or economically, and
that the probable reason that the
members. of the covenant did not
strike out the offending Article X was
that they feared that by the time that
the United States was ready to enter
the league, the existing adminstra-
tion's policy might be such that it
would demand the reinstatement of
the clause.1
No Substitute Possible t
"There is no possibility of settingt
up a satisfactory substitute at present
for the proposed league," said Pro-
fessor Crane; "the patience of the
powers already members will be ex-
hausted in time, although at the
present time they would make almostI
any concession to induce the United
States to enter. Our failure to ratifyI
would be a serious handicap to thet
success of the league. However the
prospects forsuch action being taken1
by our government are not at all im-
probable, although a faction support-
ing ratification would undoubtedly ex-'
perience vigorous opposition in the
Johnson-Borah forces."
Seats for Game Tonight Go Quick
Added interest in basketball result'
ing from the recent Wolverine wins
from the Conference leaders, was
manifested yesterday by the rapidity
with which the tickets for the M. A
C, game were dispensed.
The entire number, 2,200 tickets,
representing the capacity of the gym-
nasium were disposed of by noon at
the athletic office.

F SUCCESSFUL, WILL BEV
EXTENDED TO ALL CLASSES
E
Co-operation by members of theF
faculty has ensured that the honorn
system will be given a trial in ap-
proximately 40 literary classes dur-
ng the next two weeks. The major-F
ty of those instructors having class-g
es of less than 50 in which there areI
a majority of seniors have expressed
their willingness to permit those who
desire it to take an honor examina-
tion.
Few Object to SigningI
Few students objected to signingt
the petitions prepared by the seniorr
honor committee and those who dide
were opposed to the 'idea on the
grounds that they did not wish toI
bind themselves to report the namesr
of those whom they saw cheating. Thef
fact that a public warning is allowed
before turning in a person's name and
that it is the intention of the com-
mittee to keep the. names of those re-t
porting violations a secret as far as 1
possible served to win many over tor
the plan.
Committee Expects Success
The committee is confident that theI
plan will be successfully inaugurated
in the coming examinations inasmuch
as the senior class voted to supportf
the plan. If it is a success, the sys-
tem will be gradually extended toI
larger classes, at the same time tak-
ing in more and more underclassmen.r
In this way it is hoped to create a
favorable spirit toward the system
without running the risk of wholesale
violations.
FIRST Of MILITANTS TO
SPEAK ON BOLSHEVISM
MRS. PANKHURST HAS STUDIED
SOVIET SITUATION IN
RUSSIA
"The Woman Voter vs. Bolshe-
vism" is the subject on which Mrs.
Emmeline Pankhurst will lecture
Friday evening, Feb.' 18, in Hill audi-
torium under the auspices of the Ora-
torical association. Mrs.- Pankhurst
comes here as "an unusual, a superior
woman, with a mind and a vision far
beyond that of the common man or
woman."
At the outbreak of the war, Mrs.j
Pankhurst was in France resting
from the strain caused by her im-
prisonment in Holloway jail. She at
once declared a truce of all suffrage'
militancy and went back to England
to offer her services to the govern-
ment.
Her qualifications to 'speak on this
subject may be based on the fact that
she has often stormed the house of
commons at the head of an angry
mob of women. She also spent six
months in Russia, following the war
in order- to become acquainted with
Bolshevism at first hand.
Education Courses Bulletin Out Soon
A special bulletin outlining the
courses in education for the Summer
session of this year will be ready for
distribution next week. The bulletin
contains ,a description of all the
courses, and the staff of instruction.

]A
ATHLETIC CONTROL V
COMES UP FEB, I a
al
Regents Hanchett and Beal Say One- t
Man Proposition Discussed
Only InformallyEt
REGISTRAR IhALL FAVORS d
ALL USE OF CO-OPERATION
t_ _
One-man control of Michigan ath- b
etics, as outlined by Regent James
3. Murfin at the University of Michi-
gan club luncheon in Detroit Thurs- s
Iay, has been informally discussed for "
ome time, according to Regent Ben- s
amin S. Hanchett. The matter is un- b
der consideration by the Regents' s
committee on student activities, and w
was to have been threshed out at a c
meeting of that committee scheduled I
for last Thursday. The meeting was
not held because of the illness of b
President Marion L.' Burton, and Re- \
gent Hanchett expects that at the t
meeting next Thursday some decision d
will be reached.
Regents Meet Thursday s
This committee will report to the
Board of Regents which is to meet
Friday, Feb. 11, and action on the
natter may be taken at that time.
The plan requires the approval of the
Board of Regents before it can be
put into operation. The committee on
student activities is composed of Re-
gents Murfin, chairman, Hanchett, and C
Beal.
Regarding the announcement by
Regent James 0. Murfin that one-
man athletic control would be estab- C
lished at the University of Michigan, C
that the director would hold profes- A
sorial rank and that he would be an t
ex-officio member of the University 1
Senate committee on student affairs,
Registrar Arthur G. Hall said: "I had C
not heard of the proposal at all be- t
fore reading it in Friday's issue of w
The Daily,
Co-operation Desirable
"The two boards in control of stu-
dent activities, both the athletics
board and non-athletics board, are Y
now in entire sympathy and harmony. c
A still greater degree of co-operation t
would be quite practicable and entire- A
ly pleasing to all concerned." i
Registrar Hall is secretary of the a
committee on student activities and A
signs with Prof. Ralph Aigler all eli-
gibility certificates for inter-col- 1
legiate athletics. He determines all v
questions of scholarships and is chair- b
man in control for all other eligibil-
ity questions.
UNIVERSITY LEGION POST TO
MEET WEDNESDAY EVENING
All men who signed application
cards at a recent me(eting of the
University post, American Legion, are
requested to be present at the com-
ing meeting of the post on Wednes-
day evening. The officers have plan-
ned to make the meeting short, and
therefore request all ex-service men
to be on time, the meeting being set
for 7:30 o'clock.
By a recent ruling of the state ad-
jutant, transfers from other posts to }
the local post are unnecessary. Dues
will be accepted by the local post and
the member will thereby be kept in
good standing.
Ex-service men who desire aid in
securing Victory medals, compensa-

tion, Federal Vocational training, or
adjustment of their War Risk insur-
ance are asked to see Floyd A. Ser-
geant, post commander, or Wilfrid
Hocking, post adjutant, and their
business will be promptly taken care
of through the state welfare commit-
tee of the legion.
SIGNAL CORPS UNIT WANTS TO
ENROLL ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
Lieut. Frederick Hoorn, in charge of
the signal corps unit of the R. O. T. C.,
states that he is desirous of enrolling
electrical engineering students, espec-
ially sophomores and freshmen, in the
R. O. T. C.
A course is being arranged that will
give the maximum amount of technical
work along with the military training,
and Lieutenant Hoorn hopes that the
enrollments in this unit will increase.
Enrollments are made in the R. O.
T. C. offices behind the Economics
building.

FEB. 9 LAST ISSUE
The Daily will suspend publi-
cation with the issue appearing
unday.
The first issue in the neyt se-
pester will appear Feb. 33.
A11 notices fol' events occur-
ip$ between these dotes must be
i1 The Daily ofce by 5 o'clock
$agturday night.

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