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January 18, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_.

1

l4p Atri ittau h111

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
O MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Un ve
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIA ED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublication of, all news dispatches credited to it. or not otherwise
ited in this paper and the local news published therein.

Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
Mless matter.k
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business. 960; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not neessarily endorse the sentiments ex
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORI(AL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MAN4GING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. bROPHY JR.
News Editor ..............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-H.W icoc
T. H. Adams H. W.itchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis.
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor............ ......... ...J. A. Bernstein
Editorials.........Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. 3.Whinery
Assistant News........... ..................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports. ..........................Robert Angell
omen's Editor............................ Mary D. Lane
Telegraph..............................- West Gallogly
telescope....................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants

josepine Waldo
Paul G., Weber
Elizabeth Vickery
G. 14. Clark
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Harry B. Grundy
Frances Oberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
Byron Darnton

Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace V. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
W. Hume, Jr.
., E. Howlett

M. A. Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley jr.
Sara Waller

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .........LEGRANDi a. GAINES JR.
Advertising........ ..........................D. P. Joyce
lassifeds............... ...................Robt-.-0Kerr
Publication ......s.............................. F. M. Heath
Accounts..... ... ...... ....... ..............EF. 1R. Priehs
Circulation............ ...................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W- Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J J Hamel Tr. " .D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

a. a LiRaa i a

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN I. DAKIN.

The Editorial staff and tryouts will meet at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon. The upper staff will meet at
3:45 o'clock.

BLUE LAWS AND VIRTUE
Prohibition, long heralded as a violation of all
that the American' refers to when he talks about
"personal liberty", went into effect more than a
year ago. It has been, in large part, -successful in
its original purpose. But now the zealous reform-
ers who, whether directly responsible for the en-
actment of the eighteenth amendment or not, are
nevertheless desirous now of stopping every vice,
large or small, which is rampant in the world, are
trying to put through a series of so-called "blue-
laws" for the prevention of sin of all sorts among
the members of the race. This movement takes es-
pecially the form of the attempted enforcement of
Sunday observance.
The prohibition of evil practices which have a
detrimental effect not only on the perpetrator but
also on society in general is a good thing. Society
should not be made to suffer for the acts of a part
of, its members. Attempted prohibition, however,
of habits or amusements which directly affect only
individuals cannot so strongly be upheld. Not that
shimmying and cigarette smoking are not harmful
and that church-going is not a practice which we
would all do well to follow; bit whether some vices
are harmful or not, and whether certain virtues
should be more regularly practiced is somewhat be-
side the point. The present-day American values
above all else what he likes to call his "personal
liberty" and when someone begins to trample on
that liberty in .any respect and to attempt to keep
him from doing some little thing which he has been
in the habit of doing, right then is the average indi-
vidual going to regard that habit, vice or virtue,
as the most attractive thing he could possibly do
and to proceed to fly in the face of all his would-be
reformers.
There is no doubt that society needs reforming,
but the method and objectives taken by the up-
holders of changes at the present time are not only
ineffective but are apt to have exactly the opposite
effect than that for which they are intended. We
have always laughed at the ineffectiveness of the
stocks and pillaries of our Puritan forefathers; are
we disposed to find ourselves bound by similar re-
strictions in the present day?
BASEBALL'S RENAISSANCE
When the national commission of organized base-
ball recently chose as its president Judge Kenesaw
Mountain Landis, a new page in the history of the
great American game was opened, and the intro-
duction of a new chapter which might readily be
headed the "Renaissance of Baseball" was begun.
The American people, taken as a whole, are staunch
admirers of- clean, honest athletics, devoting most
of their enthusiastic "fan" energy for the support
of baseball. Events of the past year, however, when
certain members of the two teams competing for
the championship of the world transacted several
shady deals for the "throwing" of the contests
caused the trusting people to lose confidence n the
honesty of the leaders of the great game..Serious re-

suits might have developed, had not the national
commission taken the wise step it did in placing
judge Landis at its head.
In Judge Landis we find a man possessed of
three sterling qualities which make for a useful
man - a sympathetic understanding of human na-
ture, a straightforward, decided belief in the "hon-
esty is the best policy" ideal, and the moral con-
viction that the people must be served but served
with the truth. These characteristics were brought
out time and again in the decisions which he ren-
dered in court cases, fearing neither public censure
nor political interference. Such a man, as Judge
Landis, who now holds the title of supreme com-
missioner of baseball, promises welt for the national
sport, and permits the seemingly premature state-
ment that baseball is entering upon a new era -
with a leader whose past record is an unblemished
one of successes and which gives the Armerican peo-
ple the hope of again seeing their great game es-
tablished on an honest basis.
THE PROPOSED WOMEN'S BUILDING
At the meeting of Michigan alumnae Saturday
morning a step was taken which marks a definite
advance in the growth of the University and its ad-
vance toward the position of an ideal educational
institution. At this time the project of a women's
building, which at first seemed a mere dream of the
visionary, was launched with the support of the
alumnae, the President, and the women of the Uni-
versity.
The need of such a building is self-evident. The
part it is destined to play in the student life of Mich
igan women is somewhat analogous to that of the
Union. While plans for the building have not yet
been announced, its general character is well un-
derstood. It will supply the recreational facilities
in which antequated Barbour gymnasium and New-
berry hall, useful as they have been in the past, are
totally deficient. It will doubtless provide accom-
modations for visiting alumnae and guests. A din-
ing room adequate for those who depend on private
boarding houses for their daily fare will doubtless
be another feature of the women's building.
In ministering to these physical needs of the
women, the hew building will perform a service
much greater than that of a mere recreational cen-
ter. If it fulfills the expectations of its founders it
will act as a great unifying agent in the life of the
campus. In the promotion of the feeling of good
fellowship among women it will have a real func-
tion. No University spiirit can exist when opinion
is formed in small groups and the interchange of
ideas is necessarily limited to one house or dormi-
tory.
As a real union, the proposed women's building
deserves and will get the support of the students
and alumnae and the co-operation of the faculty.
HOW ABOUT IT, DOCTORS?
The President Burton-State Medic squabble be-
gns to make things look as if the honored science
of medicine were putting itself on a par with that
of selling shoes. When the state reformatories be-
(an to make shoes - also with full time workers -
the shoe dealers set up quite the same sort of a
howl - but that was to be expected.
4The Telescope
As she walked beside him through the meadow
She knew she ne'er could be his better half.
For he was a poor, unlettered country lad
And she a beautiful- young brindle calf.
Dear Noah:
Who do you really think, taken as a whole, are
the best girls in the University? Vera Symple.
Undoubtedly those taking instructions on the
piano in the School of Music are the best Chris-
tians. They make a practice of never letting the
left hand know what the right is doing.
THE AVERAGE COLLEGE MAN IS POOR-
LY EDUCATED - from a recent speech by a
prominent educator.

Yes, but the average college girl will never find
it out, so why worry?
The Irony of Pate
(With apologies to the Guillotine)
Prof. Thaddeus Jones, Spanish instructor, salary
$i,8o a year.
Carlos Rodriguez, Spanish laborer, $3,ooo a year.
Senorita Maggie Smith, Spanish dancer, $350 a
week.
Bud Bevo, premier poet of the class of 1921, now
proudly displays his latest brain child for the adula-
tion of an admiring public:
Co-ed, fairest of the fair
With thy light or darkened hair,
And thine eyes, a vacant stare,
Tell us, please, art thou all there?
Thy dress is short and does not meet
The large galoshes on thy feet,
And though we're sure thou hast a face,
We never yet have seen the place.
We know that you hate co-ed jokes,
But why in thunder do you coax
The boys who wear the small gray toques? -
I think that you have banker folks.
famous Closing Lines
"Plotters of the night," he muttered as he saw his
roommate staying up late. to graph their math
problems. NOAI COUNT.

JANUARY
S M T M T F S
1
2 3 4 5 4 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19. 20 21 22
23 21 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you live to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work.sFactory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
ise The Michigan Daily.-Adv.

_ ,

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Armor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Liied id Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. mn., 7:05 a. mn,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10ap. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
1,oca} t, Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7: 0 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES'
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
A S HDA WS
Bcih Ends of the Diagonal, Walk

Ilie
QUARRY DRUG and
PRESCRIPTION STORE
SO. STATE and N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone 308

I

Have
Twenty-five Cent
Wash Rags.
Which They are Selling
Ten Cents

i

-S - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --W - --
Mrs. Fox was bragging one day about the large
number of er cubs.
"How many cubs do you bring into the world at
one time?" she asked the LIONESS.
"Only ONE," replied the Lioness-" but it's a
LION."
MURADS COST 20 CENTS for a BOX
of 10 - BUT THEY'RE MURADS
MURADS would be lower priced if we left out
all or part of the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the purest
nd bed varieties grown-orif 1we substituted inferior
grades of Turkish toacco.
' I
But they wouldn't beMURADS-they'cion y be
Foxes!

I'

Judg e fo r yous ef-!
and E cbin~t/Ud~l~

S pecial attention is called
to Abf'rad 20s in Tin Boxes

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