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January 18, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-18

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T:HE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; COLD
TODAY

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ASOCIATED
PRESS

I_

1JAY EAN'NIGHT 1111E
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 77. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

1 i

__.

CONGRESS LIMITS
PEACE TIME ARMY
TO 175000 MEN
SENATE SETS ASIDE DECISION OF
150,000 BY VOTE OF 41
TO33

TAKE ACTION
ADVICE OF

AGAINST
MILITARY

Pershing, Baker, and War Department
Heads Advise Force Not Less
Than 250,000 Men
Washington, Jan. 17.-Congress vot-
ed today to limit the size of the reg-
ular army to 175,000 enlisted men.
The senate, by a vote of 41 to 33, set
aside its decision of last week to re-
duce the army to 150,000 men and
without a record vote adopted the or-
iginal joint resolution of Senator New,
Republican from Indiana, directing the
secretary of war to stop recruiting
until the army is reduced to 175,000
men.
Adopts Kahn Measure
The house, ten minutes later, adopt-
ed a joint resolution, sponsored by
Chairman Kahn, of the military affairs
committee, also directing the secretary
of war to cease enlistment until there
are not more than 175,000 enlisted
men in the regular establishment.
The vote was 285 to 4.
The resolutions adopted by the two
houses are almost identical in their
provisions, each providing that a 175,-
000 limit shall not prevent the re-en-
listment of men who served one or
more enlistments in the military serv-
ice. Action by the joint conference
committee of the two houses is ex-
pected to be taken speedily and the re-
sultant measure sent to the President.
Advise 250,000 Men
The action of the two houses was
taken against the recommendations of
war department heads and General
Pershing. Secretary Baker, in appear-
ing before the senate military affairs
committee advised against any, army
of less than 250,000 men after the "pres-
ent necessity of economy had been re-
lieved."
General Pershing told the same
committee 'that an army of 200,000
men consitiuted a safety margin.
The vote in the senate showed that
several senators who last week went
on record as favoring an army of
150,000 had changed about, placing
their support behind a 175,000 figure.
No reason for the change was an-
nounced, but some senators said pri-
vately that they believed President
Wilson would sign a resolution plac-
ing the future army at 175,000 men,
but would not approve a smaller num-
ber.
MATINEE MUSICALE WILL MEET
TOMORROW AFTERNOON AT UNION
The January meeting of the Mat-
inee Musicale will be held at 3:30
O'clock tomorrow afternoon at the
Unign. .A program will be ,given,
after which tea will be served.
An illustrated lecture will be given
under the auspices of the society by
Hermann Hoexter at 4:15 o'clock next
Thursday afternoon in Pattengill au-
ditorium. His lecture will be a com-
parative analysis of the numbers to be
played at the next program of the De-
troit Symphony orchestra. Mr. Hoex-
ter is the music critic for the Detroit
Times and also lectures with the or-
ohestra at the young people's pro-
gram and before the Detroit Women's
City club, a few days in advance of
tile concerts
The talk will be prefaced by a brief-
ly illustrated reference to the seating
of the orchestra, the leader, and the
program in general.
Tickets are on sale at Graham's
and Wahr's on State street.
ATTENTION, STEWARDS!
Sewards of fraternities, house

clubs, and sororities who have
hQuse jobs which could be filled
by athletes, call Hammond,
phone 188.hWork as waiters, or
in the kitchen is acceptable, as
long as it pays at least board.

Shuter Calls For
1922 Opera Books
Pointing out that operas are "re-
written" rather than "written," E.
Mortimer Shuter, director of the Un-
ion opera, yesterday announced that
scenarios or books for the 1922 Un-
ion opera must be in his hands by
June 1. The great amount of change
that must be made in the book finally
accepted makes it necessary that the
plot be turned in early.
Writers who intend to submit any-
thing are urged to commence work at
once if they have not already done so.
Although the outline of the story or
the plot is all that is absolutely re-
quired by the time limit, it is hoped
that.the dialogue, too, can be turned
in by that time. One book in three
acts, complete with dialogue, has al-
ready been submitted by a new author
on the campus.
While the nature of the plot is left
entirely with the writer, Mr. Shuter
would like to have a plot depicting
campus characters and life which
would be somewhat local. Preferably,
it should be in two acts. Those who
contemplate writing a book for the
1922 opera are asked to see him at his
office in room 308 at the Union.
CAMPUS OPINION ABOUT
HOP BAN NOT SOUGHT
-L. A. GAINES, JR.
COUNCIL PRESIDENT RESENTS
SENATE COMMITTEE STATE-
MENT
In an interview yesterday after-
noon, LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr., '21,
president of the Student council made
the following statements:
"In reading the statement of the
chairman of the Senate Committee on
Student Affairs in Sunday's issue of
The Michigan Daily, I was very much
surprised to learn that the blame for
not informing the campus-at-large of
the proposed drastic action of this
committee was heaped upon me. The
chairman of the senate committe
says: 'The president of the Student
council, who usually attends these
meetings was not present when the
question was brought up before
Christmas, so the campus-at-large was
not informed of the proposed drastic
action.'
Not Notified
"Granting the fact that I was not
present at the meeting in question, I
can in no way understand why my ab-
sence had any bearing on the matter.
It seems quite obvious that, if the
chairman of the committee had in-
tended that the campus-at-large actu-
ally consider the matter and offer sug-
gestions to remedy the evils of the
last J-Hop, he could have brought it
to my attention in the same way that
the chairman-elect of the Hop was no-
tified.
"The fact of the matter is that it
was never intended that the student
body should have an opportunity to
state its opinion and advance argu-
ments in favor of the Hop.
Not a Committee Member
"Then too, even if I had attended
the meeting before Christmas, I can
hardly see how it would have been
proper for me to publicly inform the
campus-at-large of the proceedings
of one of the faculty committees of
which I am not a member. The reg-
ularly appointed members of the com-
mittee themselves even refuse to make

statements, which indicates that it
would have been altogether out of
order for a non-member to commit
himself.
"At this time, I would like to cor-
rect several false impressions and
make clear my status on the Senate
Committee on Student Affairs. The
president of the Student council is
granted the privilege of attending all
meetings of this committee but is not
entitled to vote on any matter."

CHINESE SPOTLIGHT
TICKETS ON SALE
Five Chinese and American Acts Form
Elaborate Vaudeville
Program
PROCEEDS GO FOR FAMINE
RELIEF IN STRICKEN LAND
Tickets for the Chinese Spotlight, to
be given at 8 o'clock Thursday even-
ing in Hill auditorium by the Chinese
Students' club of the University, went
on sale on the campus yesterday. They
are also obtainable at book stores,
drug stores and from downtown mer-
chants. The price will be 50 cents.,
A short and snappy show of five
acts is the plan of the Chinese com-
mittee in charge. which is being aid-
ed by American students. the first
act is to consist of Chinese music by
L. Y. Hu, '22, and T. Y. Tsou, '24M,
who will play duets on the moon man-
dolin, bamboo organ pipes, bamboo
flute andthe Chinese violin. Elabor-
ate Chinese costumes will be worn
by all the Chinese who appear on the
program.
Elaborate Apparatus
One of the other acts will be an ex-
hibition of Chinese magic, and will
cover almost everything from sleight
of hand work to inquiries into the
spiritual world. Special apparatus
has been brought here from Detroit
for this act alone.
Announcement cards bearipng Chi-
nese inscriptions have been placed in
store display windows. At Sunday
school and the church services Sun-
day Chinese speakers told of the
great famine in China and urged the
purchase of tickets as the proceeds
from the Spotlight will go for the re-
lief of the sufferers.
Comkmittees
The general committee in charge is
T.. G. Ni, grad., Helen Wong, '24M, C.
F. Wong, '22E, F. C. Liu, '21L C. Y.
Liu, '22E, and K. H. Wu, '21. Roswell
Dillon, '21E, is business manager.
Other committees are: Stage, Larry
Frost, '21E, L. A. Kern, '22, C. K.
Chow, '21E, and P. C. Kwok, '21;
tickets, Vernon Hillery, '23, H. C.
Hunt, '23, James C. Stevens, '23, and
K. H. Wu, '21; publicity, Chesser M.
Campbell, '21, Marion B. Stahl, '23,
and F. C. Liu, '21L; program, Mark
B. Covell, '21E, and F. C. Liu, '21L.
DEBATE TEAM MEETS
NORTHWESTERN FRIDY
Michigan's Varsity debating team
meets Northwestern Friday evening at
8 o'clock in Hill auditorium, in the
first of two varsity debates to be held
in Ann Arbor. Michigan will take
the affirmative and Northwestern the
negative on the question: "Resolved-
That a Parliamentary Form of Gov-
ernment Should Be Adopted by the
United States."
This is the twenty-second annual
debate of the Central Debating league,
which was organized by Prof. J. C.
Trueblood, of the Oratory department,
in 1898. Three universities are rep-
resented in this league: Michigan,
Chicago, and Northwestern.
This year there will be two dis-
tinct innovations in the regular form
of debate. First, for the first time in
the history of the league the debate

will be held without judges and no
decision. Second, at the close of the
debate there will be an open half
hour, during which time the audience
may ask questions of either team.
The team that debates here is as
follows: Oscar A. Brown, '21, Lake
E. Rariden, '21, and Preston H. Scott,
'22. The negative team, which will
debate Chicago at Chicago, Is: Byron
F. Field, '21, William H. Frankhau-
ser, Jr., '22, and Leon E. Grubaugh,
'22.

Brain Tests To
Be Given Today
Students now on probation will take
the first of two mental tests this after-
noon in the Law building to determine
the causes of their poor work and to
form a partial basis for advice as to
their future course. The tests were
recently voted by the faculty and will
be given by the bureau of mental tests
and measurements.
The tests have been arranged in two
parts, the first test being given at 4
o'clock this afternoon in rooms B and
C of the Law building, and the second
test to be given Tuesday, Jan. 25, at
the same time and place.
The test this afternoon will not
take more than one hour. In addition
to the 371 students on probation, it
will be open to those students who
have signified a desire to discover
their mental breadth.
S, C, Ai ORIVE EXCEEDS
ITS SET QUOTA BY $100
With a total of $5,107.50 contribut-
ed during the Student Christian as-
sociation drive for $5,000, the last
work of the campaign ended last night
with the gathering in of all late re-
ports and computations for the teams
and individuals winning the steak din-
ner of the S. C. A. and the Rotary
club.
The steak dinner will be given the
latter part of the week, officials an-
nounce. The men who will be pres-
ent and the amounts which they se-
cured are as follows: High team,
$405.50, Ramon Capistrano, grad.,
captain, Vincenti del Rosario, '21L,
Harold Stock, '21, Earle E. Kincaid,
'22L, Harold Heller, '21E, William
Strickler, '23, Wilbert Claxton,23,
Arnold Pratt, '24E, Francis Rollins,
'24E, and Angus Babcok; high men,
Ramon Capistrano, grad., $213.50,
Perry Hayden, $114, Earl Kincaid, $96.
The luncheon which the Ann Arbor
Rotary club has tendered to the man-
agers of the drive, the president of the
S. C. A. and the captains of the three
high teams will be given at the regu-
lar meeting of the club at the Union
next Wednesday. The captains are:
Capistrano, Oswald C. Michelmann,
'22, with $359.57, and Ben C. Fair-
man, '21, with $300.75.
ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
HAS OFFICE IN UNION
Information may now be hd from
the Student Committee on Athletic Af-
fairs at its headquarters in the Union.
Office hours are from 5 to 6 o'clock
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons at
desk number one in the student ac-
tivities office in the Union.
All athletes doubtful as to their
University work may interview the
eligibility section of the committee
before examinations at the above
hours. Baseball or basketball men
who find the hours inconvenient may
call Clark Bennett at 131, and Carl-
ton Finkbeiner, whose phone number
is 63, will confer with all track or
football athletes.

It is not for us, the younger
generation, to come forth with
proof of platitudes, such as the
single presentation of opportun-
ity.
It is in our province to point
out that at least this presenta-
tion is here, before us, and
awaiting us.
"The time has come"-only we
aren't "oysters"!
Criticism, on any matter per-
taining to Michigan, is not only
desirable, but necessary. Pro-
fessors, who for a term of years
have seen the multitudes come
and go, are in a peculiarly ap-
propriate position to make these
criticisms. No one doubts their
ability to do so, but to date no
communications, making for a
better Michigan, have been re-
ceived from them by the Sunday
editor. This statement is, frank-
ly, a solicitation.
It is addressed to the campus-
at-large, with particular atten-
tion to the forthcoming of opin-
ions from members of the fac-
ulty.

TO MEMBERS OF THE
FACULTY

PURPOSE OF BANQUET IS
STRENGTHEN MORALE
OF TEAMS

TO

ATHLETES RESPOND
TO Se C, A.BANQUET
TONIGHT AT UNIOR

FORBEAR COMPLACENT
LIFE URGES MCDOWELL'
BISHOP CONDONES CALCULATING'
SPIRIT OF PRESENT
DAY
"A man should interpret his own
life when he is at his highest mo-
ments. The world cannot be saved
from the chaos which reigns at the
present time by men and women who
do everything in the calculating, re-
strained spirit of today. We must
trust ourselves at the moment of our
best interpretations of our life's pur-
poses and act," said Bishop William'
F. McDowell of Washington, D. C., in
his address on "A Man's Interpreta-
tion of His Own Life," at the Univer-
sity service Sunday night in Hill aud-
itorium.
"You University men and women
must not lead complacent lives,
teaching in complacent schools on
complacent salaries,' he said. "You
must lay hold of the minds of the
world and open them to the call of
Christ. In the last analysis we have
the necessities of life, but the world
breaks and loses out at the point of
character. We have the task before us
of making this a moral, as well as an
endurable world."
The next Union service will be held
Sunday, March 6.
FRENCH FACULTY WILL TAKE
LEAD PARTS IN PLAY FRIDAY
Labiche, author of "Le Monsieur
Qui Prend La Moyche," the play that
will be presented at 8 o'clock Friday
night in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
by faculty members of the French de-
partment, is the most celebrated hu-
morist of the nineteenth century in
Franc.
One of Labiche's critics calls him
"the fun-maker of the middle classI
French people." Another author, in
speaking of him says: "His humor is
so good-natured, his touch so light,
so free from bitterness and sarcasm,
that one cannot help enjoying what
he puts into the mouths of his char-
acters." Other works of Labiche's
that are studied in the French de-
partment are "Le Voyage de Monsieur
Perrichon" and "La Poudre aux
Yeux."
Prof. Arthur G. Canfield and Prof.
Rene Talamon will take leading roles
in the play which will be followed by
a dance in Barbour gymnasium. Ad-
mission to the play and dance will be
50 cents to those who are neither as-
sociate members or participating
members of the Cercle Francais.

DR. JOSEPH MC CRACKEN
TO GIVE PRINCIPAL TALK
Carl Johnson, Prof. Frayer on Pro-
gram; 159 of 18 Places
Filled Last Night
Reports from athletes intending to
be at the All-athletic banquet at 6
o'clock tonight in the Union indicate
that all of the 180' places available
will be taken. So far 54 football men
have signified their intention of be-
ing present, 14 baseball men, 65 track,
12 basketball, 3 tennis, 4 swimming
men, 3 coaches, and 4 managers.
"The chief purposes of the ban-
quet given by the S. C. A.," said Tad
Wieman, '21, general chairman of the
committee, "are to foster a feeling of
fellowship and friendship among the
athletes in the different sports, to help
cultivate the sense of responsibility
of the athlete to the University, and
to strengthen the morale of the ath-
letic organizations."
The program has been announced
by George Duffield, '23L, chairman of
the program committee, as follows:
Toastmaster, E. E. Wieman, '21;
"America in the Olympics and an Ath-
lete's Responsibility," by Carl John-
son, '20; "Role of an Athlete as View-
ed by an Interested Observer," by
Prof. W. A. Frayer, of the history de-
partment; bass solo by Robert Mc-
Candliss, '21M; and "The Greatest
Game in the World," by Dr. Joseph
C. McCracken.
Lockwood Leads
Varied Symphony
Concert Progrtam
(By S. B. C.)
The University Symphony orchestra
with Samuel Pierson Lockwood as
conductor gave an interesting and va-
ried program Sunday afternoon in
Hill auditorium.
In the first two numbers, "Three
Pieces for orchestra, Opus 33," by
Jenson, and "Angelus," by Liszt, the
best work was done by the first vio-
lins, the ecllos, and the wood wind
instruments. "Canzona," the second
of the three pieces by Jenson, brought
out the possibilities of the string'
group.
It was not until the final number,
"Symphony, Opus 4" in D major, by
Svendson, however, that the orches-
tra became a unit under the baton of
Mr. Lockwood. The different divisions
of the organization became a whole
and furnished music which brought
enthusiastic applause from the audi-
ence.
The duet from the first act of "Car-
men," by Bizet, sung by Mr. and Mrs.
Wheeler, of the voice department of
the School of Music, and acompanied
by the orchestra, delighted the listen-
ers.
Irish Truce Talk Ceases for While
London, Jan. 17.-By the suspension
of the negotiation begun by Father
O'Flannigan, there has been a com-
plete cessation of unofficial conversa-
tion for an Irish truce and it is not
likely that such will be renewed for
at least two months.s a
The government's view is that no-
body to speak of the Sin Fein has yet
come forward to discuss matters with
the government whose attitude re-
mains unchanged. The government
declined to discuss peace until the
Iclaim for independence has been with- .

drawn and the Republican army sur-
render its arms.
'24 LITS MEET
A meeting of the freshman lit:
erary class will be held'. at 4
o'clock this afternoon in Uni-
versity hall.

CHINESE STUDENTS HOLD
RECEPTION SATURDAY

NIGHTI

More than 100 guests were present
at the reception given for President
Marion L. Burton and Mrs. Burton by
the Chinese Students' club Saturday
night in Lane hall.
The club presented President-Emer-
itus Harry B. Hutchins with a Chi-
nese vase, in appreciation of the ben-
efit that they had derived under his
administration.
The following offlecrs were elected
for the coming year: Helen Wong,
'24M, president; Zok Tsao, '23, vice-
president; Kyung Tsong, '22P, secre-
tary; Me-tsung Dong, '23, treasurer.

A RELIEF SPOTLIGHT!U

A Snappy Vaudeville Show Supported by The Best Talent on The Campus
Proceeds For Chinese Famine Suppers
HILL AUDITORIUM, JANUARY 20
Tickets 50c. On Campus at Wahr's and Grahams

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