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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

____ ___ ____-i _

4r p~M c~itgau PtI
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univcr
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
!less matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial. 2414. .
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not nxecessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if !eft at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarilyrendorse the sentiments ex.
pressed in the romi-aunications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News, 'ditor ...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor... ........................J. A. Bernstein
editorials. ............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News..............................E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports.. ................................. Robert Angell
Women's'Editor ............................. .Mary D. Lane
Telegraph .......................................West Gallogly
Telescope ....................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
Paul G. Weber Wallace F.. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Elizabeth Vickery Leo J. Uershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
George Reindel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
Frances Oberholtzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
Robert E. Adams . W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
Byron Darnton . E. Howlett
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising .......................................D. P. Joyce
lassifieds......................................Robt. O. Kerr
Publication ................................ F. M. Heath
Accountsi........................................E. R. Priehs
Circulation................ ....................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
GW. Lambrecht P.I RHutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
SigmundvKunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Srawon
J. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

prices is ahead and they wish to take advantage of
it. Furthermore most of them are none too sure
of steady employment and they are trying to build
up reserve to live on if they are thrown out of
wort
No recommendation from high governmental au-
thority will operate to produce economy in buying
so forcefully as these conditions will. What is
needed right now to stem the tide, is not economy
but wise buying which will create a growing de-
mand for staple consumption goods. As soon as
the present stock is exhausted, industry will again
pick up momentum, workmen will be able to work,
and a new era of prosperity will dawn: Instead of
attempting to make the existing stock stretch out
over a long period, we should strive to deplete it as
we can by sensible consumption. Not much hope
for commercial recovery can be held out until the
necessity for new goods forces renewed demands
upon the manufacturers.
JAMES HAMILTON LEWIS
The man in public life who escapes being iden-
tified in the popular mind by unimportant details
of physical appearance or insignificant episodes in
his life can indeed count himself lucky. From this
playful habit of the public mind, J. Hamilton Lewis,
who will speak tonight under the auspices of the
Oratorical association, has had no miraculous es-
cape. It is doubtful if the "average man" has not
learned facts about the ex-senator in something like
the following order: () his sartorial splendor,
(2) his hirsutal superiority, and (3) his' immortal
encounter with the waitress who forestalled his
pleasantries by saying, "I'm used to being kidded
by experts."
But if the "average man" will pass through the
realm of "small-talk" to that of accomplishment, he
will find that ex-Senator Lewis has long been a
prominent figure in politics, having twice beenpro-
posed for vi.ce-president of the United States and
having filled several other important public offices.
Because of his long experience in politics, his
knowledge of national problems, and his ability as'
a speaker, J. Hamilton Lewis' speech tonight prom-
ises to be well worth attending.
TRACK BURNERS NEEDED
Coach Steve Farrell is working out his track
men daily in Waterman gymnasium, but he has
only about sixty candidates for the Varsity team.
He ought to have more. Last year we depended to
a considerable degree on the ability of Captain
Johnson but now, without his unusual point-getting
help we are dependent more on the general qual-
ity of the squad.4
Sixty good men can more than make a team, but
sixty tryouts is not enough. Other universities have
had much larger turnouts for track this year. Why
not Michigan? The larger schools have in the
neighborhood of a hundred or more. If we cannot
turn out as well as they, have we a right to blame
anyone but ourselves if we fail to measure up to
Conference standards?;
Some men will, by the law of averages, turn up
ineligible at the end of this semester, and others
won't measure up to standard; we have to make al-
lowances for that. If we really mean business, let's
get some more men out on the floor of Waterman
gymnasium and not be long about it.
Penn State has a new departure - a domestic
science course for men. We haven't any home ec-
onomics department, but wouldn't next semester
be a good time for Michigan to inaugurate some
such course as "The Art of Aesthetic Tea-Drink-
ing," with classes to be held in Waterman gymna-
sium?'

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
Both Ends of the Diagonal alk

DLTROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and et ery two.
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in.,
also 11:00 p. in.To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

_
.o

999

TAXI

999

4

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service
enoughsaid -

999

TAXI.

999

9

rt

JANUARY
S M T W T

s

2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31
MNei:

4
11
18
25

J
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

F S
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29

The "Y" InnLane Hail
Good Home Cooked Meals
Prompt Service

Last season's hats turn-

ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all now trimmingsj
look just like new, wearjust as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hit Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Law, Medical
and
Dental Books
Bought, Sold or
Exchanged

SMALL PRIVATE DINING
ACCOMODATING AS HIGH AS 25

BOARP BY THE WEEK AND
INDIVIDUAL MEALS

J. J L i1J.

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921.
Night Editor-THOMAS H. ADAMS.
WAIT FOR THE REASONS
No wonder an immediate wave of resentment
and surprise followed announcement Thursday of
the discontinuation of the Hop. Michigan's oldest
and greatest social institution, around which so
many memories and traditions have grown up that
the event seemed as permanent as the University
itself, could never be brought to an end without a
tremendous stir of protest and discussion. But the
question is, should that discussion be running
amuck with talk of indignation meetings before the
committee on student affairs has given the reasons
for its action?
Let's get all the facts before we render our ver-
dict. 'The committee, on which the student body is
represented, realizes the place held by the Hop as
well as we do, and appreciates the seriousness of
the step it has taken. Obviously, then, it took ac-
tion only after full consideration and when evi-
dence to support its reasons had been brought to-
gether. The campus certainly is owed some ex-
planation of the move ; and, on the other hand; the
campus owes it to the committee to withhold judg-
ment until that explanation is given.
* NEEDED: A BUYING STIMULUS
Lloyd George has asked the people of England to
practice the most rigid economy in order to help
overcome the evil effects of the present economic
depression in that country. The question arises
naturally enough, should we in America strive to
attain that end by the same means?
Here we are confronted with a great temporary
suspension of industry, universal in some lines,
only partial in others. Hundreds of thousands of
working men and women have been thrown out
of employment with the result that their only
source of income has been cut off. Various con-
tributing factors have been in operation for some
time which have tended to bring about this condi-
tion. Manufacturers claim that ever since 1914,
the efficiency of labor has been on the decline and
that the growing costs of labor and raw materials
have combined to force prices upward. Laborers
and the great classes of people who are neither lab-
orers nor manufacturers, in the strict industrial
sense of the word, contend that the costs of living
have increased more rapidly than have their in-
comes. No single cause in a movement so great
as this can be singled out and held to sole blame.
Many other elements enter into the situation in-
cluding the heavy exchange rate favorable to this
country which operates to keep foreign buyers out
of our markets, the period of injudicious specula-
tion which always exists with an extended rise in
prices and which has been markedly present in the
past years, and the sudden loss of confidence in the
immediate commercial future of various industries
throughout the nation.
We are now in the midst of the depression. So
many people have been thrown out of work that
much of our former actual demand has ceased to
be even potential demand. People out of work and
without money simply cannot buy. Others who
still retain their jobs are buying in minimum por-
tions because they feel that a general decline in

Blue Books
Typewriting Paper

Fountain Pens
Metal Pencils

Biddle's Book Store

11 Nickels Arcade

(I, y ry
4~CIGARETTE
Mrs. Fox was bragging one day about the large
number of her cubs.
"How many cubs do you bring into the world at
one time?" she asked the LIONESS.
"Only ONE," replied the Lioness-"but it's a
LION.
MURADS COST 20 CENTS for a BOX
of 10-BUT THEY'RE MURADS!
MURADS would be lower priced if we left out
all or part of the 100% Turkish tobaccos of the pureft
and best varieties grown-or if we substituted inferior
grades of Turkish tobacco.
But they wouldn't beMURADS--they'donly be
Foxes!

Register No w
New Class Starts
Mon. Jan. 24 '21
We Guarantee to teach
You to Dance in one
Course. This is at
HALSEY'S'
Dance Studios
The Name Speaks For Itself

The Telescope
The Fusser's Lament
He who first declared to me,
"There ain't no Santy Claus,"
I long since have forgiven
Knowing all have human flaws.

Specialattention is called
to Murad?Olsin Tin Bores

"Ju dge for youlrself -!"
Mokrs of h..Hy esf CS; 'Trkish
4Aa. g- and Egyptian Cgomares in Ib, lbnd.

~=1)

r - ....

i

But the lad I can't forgive, with whom
The floor I'd love to mop
Keeps repeating with a silly grin
"I hear there ain't no Hop."

Beautifully hand-tailored garments,
the best fabrics obtainable, the lat-
est young men's models. A com-
plete line of the finest clothing
Ready-to-Wear, in America.

"Early in my youth I worked as a clerk in a
cheap cigar store."-From the autobiography of a
steel magnate which appeared in a prominent
monthly recently.
Sort of risen from the ranks, eh?
Very, Very Good, Eddie
Dean (to student who has broken and refused to
pay for $1o worth of lab apparatus)-All right,
then, take your choice, $1o or expulsion.
Stude-I'll take the $1o.
He slew his Pa and Ma in a cold blooded way,
But on trial his honor to soften
He cried in a child-like and innocent way,
"Don't be hard, judge, upon a poor orphan."
'21-Is ignorance of the law a valid excuse
'2IL-Certainly not, you poor simp.
'21--Then what alibi do you laws give the prof.
Famous Closing Lines
"A mahogany finish," said he as he saw the cop
crack the prisoner with his billy.
NOAH COUNT.

RESSERS
WE .WA /G6oM
lgnV8

HIRSH-WICKWIRE
HICKEY-FREEMAN

WAGNER & CO.
STATE STREET-AT HEAD OF LIBERTY
ESTABLISHED 1843

$Ladies Party Guns a Specialty
Ink Pencil

11

Our splendid stock of these
high grade suits reduced to
$35.00 $50.00 $65.00

"I

Haller & Fuller

State St. Jewelers

'U. 'Ill,1

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