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January 14, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-14

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THE WEATHER
SNOW AND COLDER
TODAY

r £ f r m a n

ialip

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 74. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

f

S. CIA. FUND SHOWS
$33NEXT TO LAST DAY
SEVERAL FRATERNiTIES STILL
EXPECTED TO REPORT
CONTRIBUTIONS
R. CAPISTRANO, GRAD.,
SOLICITS SUM OF $146.50

Filipino-Michigan Club Sets
Mark for Other Campus
Organizations

High

With but one day of the Student
Christian association drive for $5,000j
remaining the total reached last night
was $3,323. Although a supreme ef-
fort on the part of the committeemen
is necessary to put the drive over of-
ficials believe it will reach the mark
set as many committeem n have not.
reported and several contributions
from different organizations are to
come in tomorrow.
Mark B. Covell, '21, .assistant man-
ager of the drive said late last night
that several reports from fraternities
which had made their contributions
had not been turned in at that time
and more were sure to come in dur-
ing the last day.
Capistrano High Man
High man in Thursday's campaign
was Ramon Capistrano, grad., with
a total of $146.50. Much of Capis-
trano's work has been among for-
eign students, who are :reported as
giving almost unanimously and in
large contributions. One club, the
Pilipino-Michigan club with contri-
butions from only half of its member-
ship of 22 received, has already given
a total of $60 and other organizations
of different countries are expected to
contribute in a body today.
Kincaid Second
Second high mran yesterday was
Earle E. Kincaid, '22L, with $77;
third, H. A. Weitzman, '24E, with
$58; fourth, C. O. Christiansen, '22,
with $55; fifth, Phillips P. Elliot, '22,
with $53.50.
The team of Capistrano took high
honors last night with a total of
$267.50, while that of Stewart R.
Boyer, '22, was second with $233.26,
(Continued on Page Eight)
Call Issued For
Opera Tryouts
Issuing a call for try-outs for the
1921 Union opera, E. Mortimer Shu-
ter, director, yesterday announced the
hours and days which he will see men
who wish to try out for places in both
the acting cast and the chorus. Start-
ing next Monday, try-outs will be
held daily in his office, room 308 of
the Union, from 10:30 to 12 o'clock
in the forenoon and from 2:30 to 4:30
o'clock except Saturday. In special
cases try-outs will be held by ap-
pointment.
Although the acting cast will be
smaller this year than last, the chorus
will be larger. Both will be requir-
ed to do some extremely strenuous
preparatory work in acting, singing
and dancing. The cast requires spe-
cial types of men, about 110 being
needed for stage and orchestra.
The book for this year's opera has
been informally accepted, but a formal
acceptance by the committee in chage
is necessary before announcement of
the title can be made. It is said that it
will be in two acts.

PRESIDENT BURTON 900
PLAN FOR HOSPITAL AROUSES
INDIGNATION OF
PHYSICIANS
"The clinician of the future is to be
a man of experience and in his prime.
A man whose primary interest in life
is science and education,unot wealth;
one who is willing to give up the lim-
ousine habit," said President Marion
L. Burton in his address at the meet-
ing of the physicians of the state yes-
terday afternoon in the reading room
of the Union.
He declared: "The American medi-
cal mind has made more contributions
to science than that of any other
country." Discussing the problems of
NEW COMMERCE CLUB
HOLDS FIRST MEETING
ASSOCIATION ELECTS OFFICERS
FOR ENSUING
YEAR
Convening for the first time, mem-
bers of the new Commerce club met
last night in room B of the Law
building to complete an effective as-
sociation and also for election of of-
ficers for the rest of the year.
Glenn H. Marcey, '22, was chosenI
president, Syl-via Hosbein, spec., vice-
president, Donald Scott, '22, secretary,
and Arthur O. Nickols, '22, treasurer.
Although it had been planned to se-
cure Governor-elect Groesbeck as the
first speaker on the program of the
club, word has been received from him
to the effect that he would be unable
to fulfill the engagement for the orig-
inal date in the latter part of the
month. According to Marcey, Gov-
ernor Groesbeck, in a communication,
declared that he would be availablek
for any other time, and in all proba-

)ISSES STATE DOCTORS
medical education he spoke of the
part time medical instructor, who
sometimes worked gratis and other
times received a pittance. "The full
time, or academician plan," he said,
"took either young men or those al-
ready past the zenith of their ca-
reer.
"The hospital ought to be a place
where human beings are being taken
care of. They should receive the best
of attention regardless of the strata
in society from which they come," he
said.
Continuing, President Burton told of
,the arguments against the plan to per-
mit the hospital to accept pay cases
in order that the revenue gained from
these cases might be used for the pay-
ment of salaries of doctors and in-
structors who are now on part time,
but who, it is planned, to put on full
time.
In favor of the plan he stated that
it would be possible for the Univer-
sity to have a type of men who mean
a much larger service to the state:
It puts the burden where it belongs.
It has all the advantages of group
medicine. The plan has been tried
privately and it worked. President
Burton was introduced by Dr. Ruben
Peterson of the Medical school:
Following the address of the Pres-
ident a discussion took place. Dr. An-
gus MacLane, of Detroit, spoke, say-
ing that if the state wishes to build]
a large hospital it should be built
where the center of population is lo-
(Continued on Page Eight)
PLAN FOR RE GlUN
IMMIGRATION OFFERED
WOULD FIND LABOR NEEDS OF
COUNTRY AND ADMIT MEN
TO FILL THEM

ACTS OF COMMANDING OFFICER1
AT VLADVISTOK AIDS
ADJUSTMENT
LIEUT. LANGDON VICTIM
OF SENTRY'S SHOOTING
Admiral Gleaves. Receives Message
From High Officials of
Oriental Ports
Washinglton, Jan. 13.-Notification
that the Japanese commanding officer
at Vladvistok had given orders that
T-n~i ntip nt ont challenge

JAPAESE ~r RLITDS, ENGINEERS
FVD S SJOIN IN SMOKER
EIP EG [T IER More than 500 members of the senior
literary and engineering classes as-
sembled last night at the combined
smoker of the classes held in the Un-
U Sion.

President Marion L. Burton, the
principal speaker, addressed the gath-
ering on the influence of self respect
in making a successful life. He as-
serted that there are three funda-
mental characteristics, of self respect
in the individual, clean living, abso-
lute honesty and active opposition to
things contrary to the workings of so-
ciety.
Other speakers were Dean John R.
Effinger, Prof. H. C. Sadler, who took
the place of Dean M. E. Cooley, who
was called to New York.
Entertainment was furnished by
George Rodgers orchestra, Knight
Merrielies, '21E, and George Roder-
ick, '21E.

I

C
r
Y
ti
n
a
b
ii
J
f"
p

hereaiter sentries mustiu naiu6
Americans and the formal expression
of regret by the Japanese government
went far today towards adjusting the
situation which has arisen over the

fatal shooting by a Japanese soldier
at that port of Lieut. W. H. Langdon,
of the cruiser Albany.
Reported by Gleaves
The action of the Vladivistok com-
mander was reported to the navy de-
partment by Admiral Gleaves, com-
mander-in-chief of the Asiatic fleet,
who was on his way to Vladvistok to
conduct a personal investigation.
The admiral added that the report
had been sent to him by radio and in
view of it he had abandoned his trip
of investigation.
Ambassador Shidehara, of Japan,
called upon Acting Sceretary of State
Davis late today and expressed the
deep regret of his government that
such an incident should have occured.
Earlier in the' day he had received
from the Japanese office a version of
the shooting which agreed with the
Lieutenant Langdon's ante-mortem
ettmn hat tha cat wn the first

bility will appear before the club dur- (t-femenL LnaLin e1sentryIw IILI .
ing the month of February. (By Associated Press) to fire.
Work has already begun on the or- Washington, Jan. 13.-The new plan Express Sorrow
ganization of the employment depart- for regulating immigration to the Un- The attitude of the Japanese gov-
ment of the society, which will serve ited States and differentiating desira- ernment was also indicated in a com-
as a clearing house between Univer- bles from undesirables at the source mumcation to Admiral Gleaves which
sity graduates and employers. Let- was presented to the senate immigra- said that high officials of the Jap-
ters have been sent to the various tion committee today by Harry A. Mc- anese ports had expressed their sor-
large business firms in the state, the Bride, chief of the vice section of the row and regret. The sentry who shot
purpose of which is to acquaint them state department. the American had been placed under
with the names of men who desire The commission, he suggested would arrest and would be tried by court
employment and to keep in touch with direct immigrants to places in the martial.
them until the time the men are United States where they were most'
graduated and are ready to accept needed. The commission would re- MRS. BARTLETT ADDRESSES
the positions. ceive orders for certain classes of FLINT NURSES' ASSOCIATIONS
A campus-wide canvass for new labor from sections of this country,
members will be instituted next which would be made known to con- Mrs. Barbara H. Bartlett spoke to
week, the aim of the club being to se- suls in Europe who in turn would ad- Eighth District Graduate Nurses' as-
cure 1,500 members, all students be- mit immigrants suited for the work sociation in Flint, Mich., Tuesday eve-
ing eligible*who are pursuing courses f found for them by the department. ning, Jan. 11, on "The Training of

VERY ABESPEAKER s
Takes "Our Foreign I elatis - Yest
terday and Tomorrow" as y
Subject of Address
EX-SENATOR TO GIVE TALK t
AT 8 O'CLOCK THIS EVENINGt
That James Hamilton Lewis, who isn
to deliver the sixth of the series of
lectures, given under the auspices of
the Oratorical association, at 8 o'clockf
tonight in Hill auditorium on the sub-
ject, "Our Foreign Relations - Yes-
terday and Tomorrow," is an excep-
tionally able speaker was the asser-
tion of Prof. T. C. Trueblood, of the
public speaking department, yester-
day.
"Ex-Senator Lewis is a figure of na-
tional prominence," stated Professor
Trueblood. "His long term of service
in the house and the senate have giv-
en him an insight into foreign affairsI
and his personal ability as an attrac-c
tive and most interesting speaker hasr
won the favor of many critics.
Was in Senate
Dean H. M. Bates, of the Law
school, who has long been a personalI
friend of the former senator, declar-
ed he should have especial ability in
portraying our diplomatic relations.
"Ex-Senator Lewis was in the sen-
ate in the period previous to and dur-
ing the war," stated the dean, "and
was associated with several promi-I
nent committees. In his last years in
the senate he was the Democraticz
'whip' and in all probability was in
closer touch with President Wilson's
foreign policy than any man in con-
gress, with the exception of Senator
Gilbert M. Hitchcock, chairman of
the foreign relations committee," con-
tinued the dean. At present the for-
mer senator is very prominent in legal
circles in Chicago.
Dinner Planned
A dinner has been planned for ex-
Senator Lewis at 6 o'clock tonight in
the Michigan Union, at which Dean
H. M. Bates, Prof. T. C. Trueblood,
and seevral other faculty members,
will be present.
BASEBALL DRILL IS DAILY
AFFAIR AT U. OF ILLINOIS
Illinois has started the new year
with an eye toward the baseball hon-
ors. Carl Lundgren, formerly coach at
Michigan, is sending his men through
daily workouts at the Illinois gymna-
sium. Pitchers are the men Lundgren
is looking for and his latest acquisi-
tions are Al Alberts, high jumper,
and Jack Crangle. Crangle has tired
of chasing flies and is trying out for
the mound job. If Crangle puts them
over ashard as he hit the line he
should be a pitcher of the fire ball

NO REASONS FOR
DISCONTINUATION
OF JHOP 'GIVEN
COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS
TO MAKg STATEMENT
SOON
MANY RUMORS CURRENT;
N 0 N E AUTHENTICATED
President Burton Denies Feeling That
Action Was Taken Because
of Legislation
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chairman of
the committee on student affairs, last
night refused to make any statement
as to the reason for the action taken
by that committee Wednesday, when
it declared that there would be no
Junior Hop this year. However, Pro-
fessor Strauss did say that in all
probability a statement of the exact
reasons for discontinuing the event
would be given out by the committee
some time during the week.
Various rumors as to the reason for
the step were current on the campus
yesterday, but it was impossible to
obtain conformation of any of them.
Although President Marion L. Bur-
ton would make no statement as to
the reasons for the action, saying
that he would leave that inatter in the
hands of Professor Strauss, he de-
hied the rumor that the action was
taken due to the fact that this, was a
legislative year.
The Student council is to meet with
Professor Strauss today.
PERMISSION GRANTE
FOR SOPHOMORE PROM
COMMITTEE CHOOSES EARLY PART
OF MARCH AS APPROXIMATE
DATE
With the announcement of Prof.
Louis A. Strauss, chairman of the
committee on student affairs, that per-
mission had been granted to hold the
sophomore prom this year as usual
the prom committee held its first meet-
ing yesterday in Lane hall, at which
preliminary plans were drawn up.
The committee agreed upon a date
during the early part of March. It
was not possible to set an exact date,
as the prom committee must first con-
fer with the committee on student af-
fairs and also with officials at the
Union, where the prom will be held,
before final arrangements can be
made.

in economics, philosophy and sociol-
ogy. At the present time the club has
an enrollment of approximately 225j
members.1
SUPPLEMENT WILL
FEATURE FARRELL
Practically the entire Supplement
to be printed by The Daily next Sun-
day, will be devoted to the life, work
and accomplishments of Steve Farrell
who has been the Varsity track coach
for the past eight years.
A detailed account of Steve's life
and record as a coach will be present-
ed by Bob Angell, '21. This article will
include not only a resume of Mr. Far-
rell's work with Michigan teams but
also the results of his mentorship at
Ohio State and elsewhere.
Opinions of the leading track coach-
es of the country, as to the results ob-
tained by Mr. Farrell during his term
as a track coach, have been compiled
by Renaud Sherwood, '22, and show
clearly the esteem with which the Var-
sity mentor is held by the track au-
thorities of the country.
Possibilities for Michigan on the
track this year are reviewed by Thorn-
ton W. Sargent, Jr., '22, and give a
clue to what may be expected from the
track during the coming season.

Mr. McBride said the Johnson bill
would not reduce the number of ar-
rivals in this country, pointing out
that the exceptions the bill would al-
low would fill the ships to capacity.

Public Health Nurses." Mrs. Bartlett
also addressed the school nurses at
the Health center in Flint on Jan. 12,
on "The Opportunities in School Nurs-
ing."

OVER THE WIRE

I

ARE YOU

ASLEEP?

Try to answer that question.
Not merely from the standpoint of campus activities, studies
and pleasure, but from the broader point of view.
Are Michigan Men thinking? Are they ever serious?
Are they engaging in those little discussions that years ago
made and remade the universe, advanced ideas and exploded
theories? Are they attempting to put into thoughts those inspira-
tions that come from every phase of college life - study and activ-
ities?
If not, why not?
Is the Michigan system faultless? What is wrong? Why aren't
college men thinking like they used to?
AGAIN - WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT IT I
The Michigan Daily is compiling the sentiment of the campus
on the charge, "Michigan is asleep." Discussions are invited from
everyone and anyone connected in any way with the University.
Your name will not be used if you so desire, but all communica-
tions on the subject must be signed as an evidence of good faith.
Address them to the Sunday Editor, Michigan Daily, Ann Ar-
bor. They should not exceed 250 words, in length and should be
mailed not later than Jan. 17, 1921.

London, Jan. 13. - Pete Herman,
American bantamweight, won over
Jimmy Wilde here tonight. The ref-
eree stopped the battle and awarded
the decision to Herman in the 17th
round after he had floored the Eng-
lishman three times. The referee
stopped the contest from knockout.
Berlin, Jan. 13. - The special com-
mittee of the German Students' asso-
ciation announced today the establish-
ment of an economic bureau for stu-
dent-self-help, the primary purpose
of which will be "to guard against
further privation which is threatened
at present by certain political parties
and various interests.
Washington, Jan. 13. -- Continued
inroads into the 7,500 plurality by
which Senator Newberry of Michigan
won from Henry Ford's in today's re-
count of the ballot by the senate
privileges and elections committee.
When the committee closed tonight
Mr. Ford had gained 993 in 779 pre-
cincts recounted out of 2,200.

Professor to Discuss High

Schools

Prof. J. B. Edmondson, or the edu-
cational department, will speak to-
morrow morning before the west-
central Michigan Schoolmen's Round
Table at Reed City, Mich. His sub-I
ject is "How to Secure Better Support
for Our High Schools."

I

TICKETS, 5c
per couple
For 5 dances
On Campus
Bookstores
Michigan Union

All

Campus

Dance!

f

TICKETS, S0
Coupon
For 5 dances
On Campus
Bookstores
Michigan Union

under auspices PENNSYLVANIA CLUB
MICHIGAN UNION, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15th, 2:30 to 5:30

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