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December 16, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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C14t4r i41#u Dailyj
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICIIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postofIice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones. Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be publisied in The Daily at the
discretion oi the Editor, if :eft at or mailed to The Daily office,
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ^Y
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR
News Editor...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
T.H. Adamse . W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell I . E. McManis
J. 1. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr,
Penaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor .......... .. ....J A. Bernstein
1;ditorials............. Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant.News...............-...............E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports ........................................ .Robert Angell
Women's ,1 Editor...............................Mar y D.Lane
Tfelegraph .. ............. ..........est Gallogly
Telescope .. .....- ...-.............Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
Paul G. Weber Thomas E. Dewey M. A. Klaver
Almena Barlow Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Elizabeth Vickery L~eo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
G. E. Clark L. Armstrong Kern Beata Hasley
George Reindel Hughston MeBain Kathrine Montgomery
Dorothy Monfort Frank Ii. McPike Gerald P. Overton
Harry B. Grundy J.A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
F~rances Oberholtzer W. W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr.
Robert I;. Adams Paul Watzel Sara Waller
Norman C. Damon J. W. Hume, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising... .. ..................... . .... D. P. Joyce
Classifieds. ...................................RobtO . Kerr
Publication................................F. M, Heath
accounts....................................E. R. Priehs
Circulation ................. . ...................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R, C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawsonn
f. J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

to face. Governor Allen is a speaker whose per-
sonality will long be remembered by those who
hear him; and his method of presentment coupled
with his array of facts may be expected to provide
an address both highly interesting and worth-while.

GRAHAM

TWO STORES

,. _ ,

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
sue of Bhe Daily should see the ,ight editor, who has full charge
I all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1920.

MORE OF THE CAMPUS NEXT TIME
Last night the rollicking spirits of McIntyre and
Heath, Lew Dockstader, Fred Stone, and the other
knights of the burnt cork, appeared incognito to
conspire for laughs at the Whitney in "Minstrelsy,"
whose initial performance has surpassed the claims
to excellence made by its sponsors.
Soft shoe dancing, hypnotism, and innumerable
variety acts all contributed toward showing that
under the supervision of the Union the musical
clubs have created a blackface travesty that is dis-
tinctive among minstrel shows. The droll observa-
tions and altercations of the endmen, which formed
the basis of the jokes and repartee, were important
in winning applause and conveying to the audience
the informal, care-free atmosphere essential to suc-
cess, and the unusually good musical selections of
the clubs themselves served to round out the pro-
gram.
Through its success "Minstrelsy" has filled an
important niche in the University's comedy world.
But it has not entirely justified hopes that it would
become the forerunner of a long line of black face
comedies drawing their humor from campus life,
which should be one of the chief charms of such a
performance. More humorous references to cam-
pus celebrities should be on the program for next
year, and should mean an even greater success than
the excellent minstrelsy revival of 1920.
REWARD FOR "GUS"
Walter Camp's selection for his All-American
second eleven of Angus Goetz, for four years a bul-
wark of Michigan's line, and during the last two
seasons the Maize and Blue's captain in victory and
in defeat, is not so much a tribute to playing skill -
though "Gus" has been one of the best men to get
down under a spiral who ever fought for Michi-
gan - as to that never-give-up trait of character
which makes a great athletic leader.
"Gus" rates All-American because every ounce
of his energy has been spent for Michigan and not
for personal glory; because, no matter what the
misfortune of the play or the final score of a game,
it has always been "we'll get 'em next time ;" be-
cause he has known the value of a smile and a cool
head in a tight place, as well as the time to don his
well-known bulldog face and plough in. Steadiness
and unselfish loyalty are the characteristics which
have made "Gus" an All-American, andichigan
to a man extends the hand of congratulation with
the firm belief that it should have been a first team
appointment.
"Know' Your University" slipped up Wednesday
morning. 'Martha Cook was completed in 1915, not
1905; and far be it from The Daily to rob it of its
youth.
TIhe Telescope
STANDING
No. of Contribs Points
Women ...... ...122 366
Men..........360 360
When the campus clock chimes the hour of 12:15
tonight, thus denoting that the hour of midnight
has come, the question of whether Michigan women
have been successful in their attempts to eradicate
the stigma of being called witless, will be once and
forever settled.
Liza being pursued by the blood-thirsty mongrels
,howling for human gore presents not a bit more
stirring picture than that of the Women of Michi-
gan trying to elude the ever-approaching, relentless
Simon Legrees of masculine wit. Whether their
attempt to cross the ice-caked river of Mediocrity
has been successful will be past history ere another
24 hours have turned their cycle.
The following was turned in from Newberry res-
idence but up to late last night we were unable to
discover any clue as to the sender. However, the
police on two continents are searching for the cul-
prit and her speedy apprehension is expected.
Jean was caught between two trains;

Folks with bags picked up the remains.
The neighbors were greatly stirred up by the scene,
But the only collected person was Jean.
-Miss T. E. Rious.

DETROIT UNITED UIDitS
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 0:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. n., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p; m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e',ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m.; 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.mn., and 1:15 a.mn.
Licals to -Jackson--7:51 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

Annual Young People's Banquet at 5:45 to 7:45. Secure tickets at Lane
Presbyterian Church, Sat., Dec. 18. 1Hall, NOW.-Adv.
1ADRON AND WABASH

~V~"~" GO

DECEMBER
S M T W T
1 2

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4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

3
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Mens's de Lux Quality.
Felt i ats

N.
N, Q

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The new smart shapes - in the fashionable shades of
brown-some are silk lined-for immedate clearance

$5.00

Open Evenings Until Christmas

GRAHAM
BOTH, ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

The Blue Front

Cigar Store

SAMPLES NOW BEING SHOWN BY OUR REPRESENTATIVE
MR. RAYMOND ZOLLO

Night Editor-HUGH HITCHCOCK.

STUDENT OWNED
Corner of Stateand Packard

AT

The Cubs' club will meet at 4 o'clock this after-
0Ofl.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
When it was discovered in 1847 that two Greek
:tter fraternities had sprung up at Michigan, the
.egents forbade their continuance and attempted
have State legislation passed against them. The
raternities persevered, however, and secretly in-
iated new members until, after many years, they
ere tolerated by the University. At present there
+e listed on the campus fifty-seven fraternities and
fteen sororities.
ASSURING MICHIGAN'S FUTURE
On the honor rolls of every university there are
'ores of names of men who were "unknown" in
gh school but "found themselves" during their
>llege careers. Each year men who have shown
>great amount of ability in any particular line be-
ire coming to a university, discover what they can
> best, and spring into prominence. .
But these sudden leaps from obscurity past riv-
s whose progress has been attracting notice are
:ceptional rather than ordinary, and receive their
equent mention largely because they are unusual.
ack of experience, if nothing else, handicaps men
itering phases of college affairs new to them and
contesting against others who have scored suc-
sses during preparatory school life they are at a
sadvantage. For this reason, if no other, the nu-
eus of every great university organization of the
ture must almost inevitably be largely composed
men who have revealed ability before coming
college.
"The Michigan of the future" may seem to be
r removed from our powers of guidance, but
is much at least is true and we should not fail
iring vacation to act on it; we can now play an
tive part in assuring Michigan's gieatness for
other four years at least by influencing high
hool seniors who have led in student activities to
me to Ann Arbor next fall.

324 SOUTH STATE STREET
ABOVE CALKINS-FLETCHER DRUG STORE

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Isn't It True?

KMRM

7

' AGH of us is constantly seeking happi-
ness. We, of course, find it in different
ways. Yet from childhood to the end of our

lives we all derive happiness from music - it
puts us in harmony with thebetter things in
life.
RING into your home this Christmas the
Joy and inspiration of music. Choose from
our attractive stock of fine musical merchan-
dise the kind of music that you desire for the

coming Christmas season.

GOVERNOR ALLEN'S TOPIC
Governor Henry J. Allen, who speaks in Hill
iditorium Thursday evening, is, a man who has
ent years studying the underlying causes which
sulted in the present "Kansas Industrial Situa-
)n," his topic.
Like many men who have acquired fame in the
>litical world, Governor Allen started his career
a journalist, serving as editor of the Manhattan
ationalist and later as owner of the Wichita Daily
Bacon. He was mentioned as a likely candidate
r the presidency on account of his executive abil-
t, demonstrated most forcibly in his present ca-
city as governor of Kansas, and in his handling
labor-and-capital troubles in that state.
"The Kansas Industrial Situation" is a subject
hich most of us could well learn more about, in-
much as the conditions treated are typical and
mptomatic of: the nation's problems along the
m tine, which sooner or later we must meet face

From force of habit our girl is ever ready to en-
joy a laugh even at our expense. Just the other
night when we were coming back from taking her
to the Follies at the New Detroit, we got to figur-
ing up what the bill had come to and were naturally
a little sober. Observing how thoughtful we were
she finally remarks:
"Well, what's wrong with you, Jack?"
Still busy with our mental arithmetic we re-
joined:
. "Don't bother us, girl. Can't you see there is
something preying on our mind?"
"Well," she answers sweetly, "let it alone, it'll
soon die of starvation."
And then our forced and hollow guffaws min-
gled with her refined, girlish laughter.
Famous Closing Lines
"Stone blind," sighed the geology prof when the
student couldn't tell one stone from another.
NOAH, COUNT.

SUGGESTIONS
PIANOS AND PLAYERS GIBSON MANDOLINS
VICTROLAS AND VICTOR AND GUITARS
RECORDS' CONN SAXOPHONES,
BRUNSWICK PHONOGRAPHS VEGA BANJOS AND TENOR
AND RECORDS BANJOS
UKULELES AND LEATHER MUSIO BAGS AND
BANJO-UKES MUSIC ROLLS
ALL MICHIGAN MUSIC

lit3,3 ~n

6111-605 fast utam Otrr-et

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