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December 16, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
LITTLE CHANwE IN TE3I
PERATU RE TODAY

ri Sir iau

VOL. XXXI. No. 62.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1920.

PR ES ,MaL BTON
T TI
TOINT
ALLEN TONIGHT1
DINNER FOR GOVERNOR AT UNION
BY KANSAS CLUB PRE-
CEDES ADDRESS
"KANSAS INDUSTRIAL
SITUATION" SUBJECT
Will Speak to Detroit Industrial
Board Saturday on State
Labor Problems
President Marion L. Burton will in-
troduce Gov. Henry J. Allen of Kan-
sas at the lecture to be given at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Governor Allen's subject will be "The
Kansas Industrial Situation."
The Kansas club will give a din-
nor for the governor at 5:45 o'clock
In the union. The speakers will in-
clude Governor Allen, President Bur-
ton, and Prof. Henry E. Riggs of the
Engineering college. There will be
about 50 people present, who will in-
clude Kansas students, faculty men
and University of Kansas alumni.
Governor Allen will be entertained
by Prof. William C. Hoad of the En-
gineering college. The lecture will be
under the auspices of the Oratorical
association and admission is $1.
The Detroit Industrial board will
hear an anlysis of the Kansas la-
bor situation by Governor Allen Sat-
urday in that city.
33 Contributions
Assure Kiddies
i Full Stockings
Ann Arbor's poor children will not
find empty stockings on Christmas
day if today's contributions to the
"good fellow" fund follow the stand-
ard set yesterday when $11 were
raised. This money will be used to
provide gifts of clothing for the chil-
dren of the poor families of the city
and the tots who are confined in the
hospitals.
In addition to these gifts a Christ-
mae tree party is to be given at Lane
hall for the youngsters. The time of
this party has been changed from
4:30 to 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.
The Women's league will give a lit-
ti playlet at this time and the Union
will furnish music. All students are
invited to attend and join in the cele-
bratign.
gqxes on the campus brought in
$50 yesterday, while contributions by
the merchants in the vicinity of the
campus and certain University class-
es netted $111. The latter sum was
donated by the following: '21E, '22E,
2E, '24E, G. W. Graham, MacLain
a14 Nedam, Wahr Book company,
College Inn, Busy Bee, M. D. Larn-
ed, Majestic Billiard Parlor, Sugden
Drug company, James Foster, Wild
and company, E. E. Calkins, Slater
Book company, Guy Woolfolk, Gush-
ing Drug company, Goldman Broth-
ers, Fountain of Youth, Haller and
Fuller, A. M. Donaldson, George Moe,
EI4-Maize, Karl Malcolm, John Tro-
4anowski, the Blighty, Burtis and com-
pany, Del Grennan, a friend, Photo-

graph shop, another friend, George
Iyer.
CARL JOHNSON TO
WED SPOKANE GIRL
Carl E. Johnson, '20, captain of
last year's track team and president
of the Student council in the same
year, is to be married to Miss Grace
Hageman, of Spokane, Wash., on Dec
V. lie leaves Detroit today for Spo-
kcane,'where the wedding is to be sol-
emnized,
Mr.. and Mrs. Johnson will return
from their honeymoon on Jan. 3 tc
take up their residence in Detroit
where Johnson is connected with the
C. W. Burton Real Estate company

J-LITS TO HOLD
INFORMAL DANCE
Arrangements have been completed
for an informal party of the junior
lit class from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock
Saturday afternoon at the Union.
"Nobe" Wetherbees' seven piece or-
chestra has been secured, featuring
two pianos.j
While the junior lits are sponsors
for the dance, the social committee ex-
tends a cordial invitation to men and'
women of all classes to attend, the
limit being 250 couples.
Tickets, which are 50 cents apiece,
will go on sale tomorrow on the
campus. A limited number can be se-
cured at the door Saturday after-
noon.
SCHOLARSHIP BILL FOR
SERICE MEN EXPLINED
ENACTMENT PROVIDES FOR FOUR
YEARS' TUITION AND BOOK
ALLOTMENT
Explanation of the proposed schol-
arship bill for ex-service men residing
in the state of Michigan was given
before a large group of University
service men Tuesday night at the Un-
ion.
The tentative bill as drawn u-p by J.
E. Spier, '22L, with the assistance of
facutly men, provides for four years'
tuition, effective September, 1920, and
an annual book allowance. With the
exception of those who, although in-
ducted into the service, did civilian
work for civilian pay, all Michigan
residents who served with any branch
of the allied armies are eligible.
25 Representatives Favorable
B. F. Field, '21, chairman of the
Educational Allowance committee,
which has been largely responsible
for the inauguration of the proposed
measure,' states that more than 25
representatives have already been in-
terviewed and have pledged their ac-
tive support.
In view of the fact that the whole-
hearted support of all men affected
will be required, it is necessary that
all service men from the state of
Michigan see their representatives
while home during the holidays. The
bill will be brought before the Jan-
uary session of the legislature,
Statistics Necessary
Statistics relative to the number of
men affected at the University are
necessary in order to estimate appro-
priations, according to W. V, Gilbert,
'22E, commander of Hall post, No. 22,
V. F. W. Students interested are re-
quested to fill out a post card im-
mediately and mail to the Education-
al Allowance committee, 802 Monroe
street, the following inforamtion;
Name, Ann Arbor address, date of
enlistment and discharge, and branch
of service.
Phi Sigma Takes
13 New Members
Thirteen new :members were ad-
imitted to Phi Sigma, national honor-
ary biological society, at a fall in-
itiation banquet held in the Union
last Tuesday evenng. Dr. L. V. Heil-
brunn gave the address of welcome.
Responding to Toastmaster E. B, Mc-
Kinley, Prof. R. M. Wenley gave a
talk on "The Old Science and the
New," in which he emphasised the es
sentially transitory nature of the

present intellectual age.
The new members are: Faculty-.
Dr. R. S. Cron, Dr. L. R. Dice, Mr. F.
G. Gustafson, Mr. C. L Hubbs. and
Prof. J. F. Shepard; active-S. D.
Anderson, grad., J. S. Barnes, '21, G.
E W. Collins, grad., C. D. La Rue, J. H.
t Muyskens, grad., W. M. Simpson,

DRIVE FOR POL
PLED6 ES CLOSES
Kenneth Hoag, '24, receives $455 in
Actual Donations from ResIt
dents of Ann Arbor
SECTIONAL CLUBS CONTINUE
TO ORGANIZE FOR SOLICITING
Three hundred and sixty dollars
were added to the total actually rais-
ed for the Union swimming pool yes-
terday when Kenneth Hoag, '24, re-
ceived donations for that amount from
Ann Arbor residents. This makes
$455 that Hoag alone has raised since
it was announced that the Union
would try to complete the pool fund
this year.
Continuing the policy of utilizing
the sectional clubs during the holi-
day drive, the officiale yesterday met
SECTIONAL CLUBS MEET
Meetings of men from the fol-
lowing places have been called
for today in the Union; Bat-
tie Creek, at 4 o'clock, room
306; Pontiac, 4 o'clock, room
302; Jackson, 7:15 o'clock,.room
825; Chicago, 7 o'clock, room
225; Kansas City, 7:30 o'clock,
reading room; St. Louis, 7:30
s o'clock, room 308.

PI DELTA EPSILON
INITIATES TODAY
Pi Delta Epsilon, national honorary
journalistic society, will hold its an-
nual fall initiation at 5 o'clock this
afternoon in the Union, after which
a banquet will be tendered the nine
initiates.
A program consisting of speeches
by Prof. E. R. Sunderland, manager
of the Board of Control of Student
Publications, Harlan Johnson, editor
of the Ann Arbor Daily Times-News,
and others will follow the banquet.

.

If

with five of these organizations. The
results of these meetings were uni-
versally encouraging, and in each
instance a plan of campaign was;
formulated for the -vacation work.
Effort will be made to have as
many such meetings as are possible
so that all of the larger cities of the
country may be well covered. Grand
Rapids, Saginaw and Bay City stu-
dents have organized their commit-
tees to canvass alumni in their re-
spective cities.
Indications are that other pledges
will come in all the rest of the week
despite the fact that the drive closed
last night and the committee chair-
men will be in the booth at the Union
until faturday to receive additional
cards. Yesterday's total of new
pledges was 59 -for $821, making the'
totals to date 1,687 pledges for $31,-
108.
DEAN COOLEY TO ADDRESS
JUNIOR ENGINEERS TODAY
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the
College of Engineering and Architec-
ture, will address the junior engi-
neers at 11 o'clock on "The Five Year
Curriculum,"
For some time plans have been un-
der way for the development of such
a course, and it is expected that full
announcements of the course, and its
effect upon the third year men, will
be made by Dean Cooley at this

CLASS DUES DY9 '
PROGRAMGIEN,
Treasurers to Take Convenient Stands
on Campus forCollection of
-Annual Fees
LOCATION OF BOOTHS FOR
CAMPAIGN ARE ANNOUNCED
A universal attempt to collect dues
in observance of the first Class Dues
day will be made ebtween 9 and 5
o'clock today by the treasurers of all
classes. At locations convenient to
the respective classes, treasurers
will take their stands.
Booths Given
Locations of the booths will be as
follows: Senior. and junior lits, from
9 to 5 o'clock, corridor of University
hall; sophomore lits, 9 to 5 o'clock,
main entrance of the Library; fresh-
man lits, corrdilor of University Hall,
11 to 12, 1 to 4 o'clock; senior, ju-
nior, and sophomore engineers from
9 to 5 o'clock, second floor of the En-
gineering building; freshman engi-
neers, 9 to 5 o'clock, engineering
arch; freshman laws, 10 to 11, room
D, Law building, 11 to 12 o'clock
room C.
Booths of other classes of the Law
school- and classes in the dental, med-
ical, pharmical, and homoeopathic
schools will be found in their re-
spective buildings at convenient lo-
cations,
"The students should co-operate
with the treasurers by paying their
dues today, for it will be extremely
difficult for the treasurer to collect
the assessments throughout the
year," said Thornton W. Sargent Jr.,
'22, treasurer of the Student council,
which organization is sponsoring this
drive. "The classes and the council
will be greatly restricted in their ac-
tivities unless every student pays
up."
Council Backs Drive
At the Student council meeting last
night, the drive was heartily approv-
ed, and Le Grand Gaines, '21E, presi-
dent of that body, urged every coun-
cilman to work for the campaign's
success. Treasurers should put plac-
ards on their booths stating the class
and the amount to be collected.
Tuxs To Reign At
Last $instrelsy"
Wearing of tuxedos will be in or-
der at the last performance of "Min-
strelsy" tomorrow evening and at the
dance at the Union following, ac-
cording to Paul Eaton, '21, president
of the Union. 'In his bulletin to the
general membership of the Union he
said yesterday: "I wish to call the
attention of all members to the fact
that in former years this has been
the custom."
It is not intended to make the even-
ing unnecessarily formal, the ques-
tion of dress being left entirely with
the individual. However, those who
attend the show and dance need not
feel embarrassed in appearing in a
little more formal attire than usual.

meeting.
in room
ing,

The assembly will be held
348, New Engineering build-

FRENCH HUMORISTS TOPIC OF
CERCLE FRANCAIS ADDRESS
Charles S. Carry, of the depart-
ment of romance languages, delivered
an informal address on "French Hu-
morists" at a meeting of the Cercle
Francais held yesterday afternoon in
Tappan hall. Mr. Carry named the
French comedy writers from the time
of Moliere down to the present day,
and read extracts from- the works of
authors of the seventeenth, eighteenth
and nineteenth centuries to show the
changing character of French com-
[edy.

'23M, Hewitt Smith, '23M, and P.
Warren, grad.

A.

Walter Camp's All- American Choices

Carol Service to be Held Today
Under the auspices of the Ann Ar-
bor public schools, a carol seryice
will be held at 2:30 o'clock this after-
noon in Hill auditorium. The chorus
numbers several hundred. The gen-
eral public is invited,

First Team
L.E.--Carney, Illinois.
L.T.-Keck, Princeton.
L.G.-Callahan, Yale.
C. -Stein, Pittsburgh.
R.G.-Woods, Harvard.
R.T.-Scott, Wisconsin.
R.E.-Fincher, Georgia Tech.
Q. -Lourie, Princeton.
L.H.-Stinchcomb, Ohio.
R.H.-Way, Penn State.
F.B.-Gipp, Notre Dame.

Second Team
Urban, Boston.
Goetz, Michigan.
Wilkie, Navy.
Cunningham, Dartmouth.
Alexander, Syracuse.
McMillin, California.
LeGendre, Princeton.
McMillin, Centre.
Garrity, Princeton.
Davies, Pittsburgh.
French, Army.

Third Team
.Ewen, Navy-L.E.
Voss, Detroit-L.T.
Breidster, Army-L.G.
Havemeyer, Harvard- C.
Trott, Ohio.-R.G.
Dickens, Yale-R.T.
Mueller, California-R.E.
Boynton, Williams- Q.
Haines, Penn State-L.H.
Leech, Va. Military Inst.-R.H.
Horween, Harvard-F.B.

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