100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 25, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

% * 11 < ad-II \ -.!!" a1 4

f~irtigtt

in

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
ity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
epublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
redited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
less matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 24=4.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ature not necessarilyto appear in print,*but as an evidence of
ith. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
iscretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Jnsigned communications will receive no considleration. No mane
script will be returned unless the writer incloses postage,
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments es-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
n the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414,
[ANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR.
ews Editor ...........................Chesser M. Campbell
ight Editors-WHthcc
T. H. Adams
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J.I.Dakin T. W. Sargent, jr.
Renaud Sherwood
nday Editor. .. . .. .. . ... A.Bernstein
ditorials.... ....Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T.' Whinery
ssistant News ...-....... ...........E- P. Lovejoy jr.
ports........... ....... ..... .... . . Rbert Angell
romen's Editor........ . ................Mary I. Lane
elegraph ... ........ ... ... .... WestGa y
lescope .... ..............................jackWey
Assistants
sephine Waldo Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
aul G. Weber Thomas $. Dewey M. A. Klaver
Imena Barlow Wallace F. Elliott, E. R. Meiss
lizabeth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfev Walter Donnelly
*E. Clark d I. Armstrong Kern Beata Hasley
eorge Reindel Hughston McBain Kathrlne Montgomery'
iorothy Monfort Frank H. McPike Gerald P. Overon
arry B. Grundy J. A. Bacon Edward Lambrecht
ances Oberhotzer W. W. Ottaway William H. Riley Jr.
obert E. Adams Paul Watzel SaraJWa-ler
"orman 'C. Damon J. W. Hume, jr.

THE ACCOLADE OF APPOINTMENT
Today eleven new names make their appeara
in the staff flag at the head of this column.
men and women chosen for appointment have .
their places by no other influence than good wo
They have turned out every day and put their 1
efforts into the tasks assigned them. The sin
statement of what they have done is their 1
eulogy and with our congratulations goes as
cere welcome into the fellowship of workers wh
is devoted to the task of putting out a worthy; U
versity publication.

GRAHAM

. _ ...

A Wonderful Assortnent of all the
LATEST BOOKS.
BCT AAM
BOTH ENDS OF DIAGONAL WALK

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SINESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
rertising ..................... -. ..D. P. Joyce
sifieds......................................Robt.0. Kerr,
Aication ............. ..................... M. Heath'
ounts ....................................E. R. Priehs
ulation ........................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Gund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis ThoC. L. Rice
ter W, Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slaw-oti
. Harrel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

st
r

,. ....,..... d

Night editors for this week are as follows:
Aonday night, Hugh Hitchcock; Tuesday night;
C. W Sargent, Jr.; Wednesday night, B.P. Camp-
ell; Friday night, J. I. Dakin; Saturday night, J.
. McManis.
The Daily announces the appointment of the fol-
o wing to the editorial staff: I. A. Bacon, W. W.
)ttoway, Paul Watzel, I. W. Hune, Jr., H. 1
Yowlett, M. A. Klaver, E. R. Meiss, Walter Don-
elly, Beata Hasley, Kathrine Montgomery; to the
usiness staff: R. G. Burchell.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
sue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge'
if all news to be printed that night.

ELIGIBILITY
Michigan last year learned a lesson, a temporary
lesson at least, through the unpleasant experience
of passing through the most disastrous football
season in her history. Now, with her standing at
least partially regained and with prospects for next
year as good as they seem to be at present, it is up
to every one of us to see that she doesn't have to
learn that lesson all over again.
It was ineligibility on the part of some men who
could not be spared whjch cost us so heavily a year
ago, and there is no doubt that this was due in
part to overconfidence, not necessarily on the part
of the few, but on the part of the whole campus.
We showed that we were not behind the men as we
should have been.
Let us now remember, however, that each and
every one, whether roommate, fraternity brother, or
adviser, can help to avoid a recurrence of this in
eligibility bugaboo. If a man gets down in his
4tudies, let's lend a hand and help pull him out. If
we don't, we are merely bargaining for another
season like that of 1919.
ATTEND SATURDAY'S GAME
Ferry field is going to be the scene of one more
football game this year -- a hard-fought gridiron
battle, well worth the watching.
Saturday afternoon two of the three teams
picked by eleven judging coaches as the state of
Michigan's best are to meet here, on neutral ground,
to decide their claims to the state championship.
Some of the best high school athletes in the state
will be our guests as members of the Detroit North-
western and Lansing high school squads. They are
entitled not only to the finest kind of entertainment
during their visit, but to an attendance which the
interscholastic importance of their game warrants.
Seventy-five cents is the price of admission to
Ferry field Saturday. Michigan students will find
no better afternoon entertainment than to attend
that game; the reputation of the teams and the title
at stake guarantee a battle royal as high school foot-
ball goes.
"OUR FRIEND THE GARGOYLE"
The annual occasion to say a kindly word for the
Gargoyle has come around again. Not to speak of
the free advertising which The Daily has been so
gracefully accorded in our funny extemporary,
there is another reason best expressed in the oft-
repeated phrase, "Us University publications must
stick together," which urgently calls for our yearly
editorial commnt.
Passing over the many things which charity pre-
vents us from placing on paper, we confine our-
selves to perhaps the one outstanding good trait
of the several which Michigan's Humorous Maga-
zine possesses. That trait is the utter modesty of
its writers, which might better be called good sense.
"No signatures, no responsibility," is our sugges-
tion for a Gargoyle motto,
The Gargoyle has gained fame as far away as the
University of Chicago. In the latest issue of that
university's publication, "The Phoenix," the bird
of that name tells her flock of little gargoyles seat-
tered abodt the university gables the sad fate of
their one half-witted little brother. "I sent him to
Ann Arbor, and they named a paper after him,"
she sobs.
To be simple is to be great, said Ralph Waldo
Emerson. We salute you again, friend Gargoyle;
your place is in the seats of the mighty.
The Telepe

MICHIGAN UNION LIFE MEM-
BERS, ATTENTION
All students in their last year
of residence in the University
who have signed for a Life Mem-
bership in the Michigan Union,
and expect to get credit for the
$5 which they have paid with
their tuition, must make an ad-
ditional payment of $5 before
December 1. The Constitution
of the Union covering this point
reads as follows:
"If the applicant shall have
made application and payment
of the first installment prior to
December 1 of the last year of
his attendance at the University,
he shall be given a refund or
credit of the tuition payment of
$5 made by him for such last
year of attendance,"
Payments should be made at
the Business Office of the Union
during the regular office hours.
If the subscriber is not able to
come to the office at these hours,
a check mailed in with the
Treasurer's receipt will 4eceive
proper credit, and return of the
receipt will be made.

I

The""Inn at Lane Hal
Thanksgiving
Special Turkey Dinner

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Stindard Time) \
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. mn.,
8:10 a.t., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e; ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit -: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. i.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 asm., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jacksou-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

1.00-2.00 p. m.--Price $1.00

''--'-*1
U
I a

/'

You

Tell D ad!

I'

E

NOW IS THE TIME TO PLACE YOUR ORDER
FOR
PERSONAL CHRISTMAS GREETING
CARDS
PRINTED OR ENGRAVED
THE MAYER -=SCHAIRER CO.
STATIONERS, PRINTERS AND BINDERS
OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Phlone 1404 112 South Main Street

i

That you would like a Full Dress Suit, or a Tugcedo
Coat, or an honest-to-goodness business suit that you will
not have to explain that it was a hundred and fifty dol-
lars, but owing to EST, you only paid $39.20 and that
it NOW looks like $15.00.
We are showing a large variety of suit-
ings and overcoatings that will please you
and when it comes to the price you will
wonder where we found such values.
ALL OUR PRICES ARE MARKED
IN PLAIN FIGURES
and we are making a REAL 10% discount on our last spring
prices. NOT THIS FALL PRICES.
We Purchased Early.

M

- THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1920.

KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
Twenty couples attended what is said to be the
first J-Hop in 1878. Last spring more than five
hundred couples were present. Since the hop of
'78, the dances have been held ev ry year except
in 1914, and in 1917 when none were held on ac-
count of the war.r

1IT U RAL NOTICI
All fraternities wishing to en-
ter teamsrin the swimming and
bowling tournaments can do so
by calling the intramural office.
Phone 2268.yN
Read The Daily for Campus News.

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE

..
,",
F

J. KARL MALCOLM
LIBERTY AT MAYNARD
-3

i

MORE THAN A DINNER
With the events that gave rise to Armistice day.
resh in our minds, it is not hard to realize, the
road significance of that occasion, but is the same
rue of Thanksgiving?
Easter, which was born out of a supreme sacri-
ce, is new often no more than an occasion to dis-
lay a new spring hat. The Fourth of July, com-
nemorating our most important national act, is
t times nothing but twenty-four hours reserved for
booting fire crackers. Even Thanksgiving is,
hought by some to be completely observed by eat-
ig a turkey dinner. Have the means used in ob-
erving these occasions become the ends in them-
elves ?
During the past year things have taken place in
he lives of every one of us for which we should
e as grateful as were the pilgrim fathers when
hey first came to realize that one day a year
iould be set aside to give thanks for prosperity en-
eyed. Probably none of us has been threatened
y starvation' or massacre, but escape from these
erils is not the only occasion for thanks, and our.
'stence is several times more comfortable ,than
ioneer life was in New England.
Today, nearly three centuries after the initial hol-
lay, we should be animated by the same spirit of
ratitude that moved our pilgrim fathers.
TODAY'S SPEAKER
Prof. Edward Alfred Steiner, who is to give the
nion Service Thanksgiving address today, is a
an of acknowledged ability as a sociologist, au-
or, and speaker. Born in Vienna, he came to this
mntry shortly after receiving a degree at the Uni-
:rsity of Heidelberg. During his career here he
.s been clergyman, journalist and an authority on
e immigrant. Among his books are "Tolstoy, the
an," "On the Trail of the Immigrant," and "The
nmigrant Tide."
With, Professor Steiner as principal speaker any-,
e who fails to attend the Union Thanksgiving
rvice today will miss a real opportunity.

NEXTI
A peach came walking down the street,
She was more than passing fair,
A nod, a smile, half-closed eye,
And the peach became a pair.
-Michigan Daily,

Nov. 21.

The peach became a pair, you say?
Then I'll venture just one guess -
Her dainty feet were shod with shoes
And not with arctic foolishness.
(Ed. Note.-This is the first thing run this year
on galoshes and gladdened our editorial heart as the
first robin does the poet's.)
Dear Noah:
At nights after I have studied for several hours
my brain sometimes feels as though it were on fire.
What can I do for this? Studious.
Do what we have often advised others' to do un-
der similar circumstances if your brains feel as
though they are on fire, blow them out.
Pamou Closing Lines
"The straight and narrow weigh," he muttered as
the erect but thin lady stepped on the scales.
NOAH COUNT

itrettea ,
CC
Just Mild-Zuouh!"
Made from- sun -ripenied Kentuckjy tobacco avo
midbut unusually fragrant and satisfying.

Sold all ovr town-20 for 20*

John J. Bagley & Company, Detroit, Michigan
Manufacturers since 1850

f

'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan