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November 25, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-11-25

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WEATHER

11

CLOUDY; NO CHANGE IN
ITEMPERATURE TODAY

rsfr t§Uf

4:Ia it

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT NhIRE
SE.RVICE

,.

VOL. XXXI. No. 45.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1920.

PRICE FIVE C

, ,.,
_ ,
- - --- J-

STATE COMMITTEE
rTO HEAR "BUDGET
EXPLAINED FRIDAY
7,490,000 CALLED FOR IN MEX.T
TWO YEARS FOR BUILD-
INGS
PRESIDENT BURTON TO
SHOW MICHIGAN'S NEED
One-eigth of Sum Will Be Used. lip
Purchasing New Ground; Sites
Now Owned, Occupied
President Marion L. Burton wiI.
appear before the budget commission
ot the state legislature Friday, Nov.
for the formal hearing of the Uni-
versity budget.
The budget, calling for a sum of
$8,690,000 for the two years of 1920-
1921, as the first step in a. proposed
six year building program for the
University, was presented to the com-
mission at Lansing Nov. 15 by Pres-
ident' Burton and Shirley W. Smith,
secretary of the University.
Survey Furnished
With the estimate ,of the expendi-
tures was furnished a survey,.of the
present inadequate equipment and
crowded condition of the University,
showing that unless its needs are met
by sufficient legislative ;appropria-
tions, "it must sacrifice its prestige
and frankly concede that it cannot
rank with the other leading state uni-
versities.r
The =building program is entirely
separate from the regular mill tax
and it is stated In the request for the
Original appropriation that it will be
necessary for the Regents to ask the
legislatures of 1923 and 1925 each for
$5,000,000 for the completion of the
program..To meet the increased main-
tenance and living cost, the Regents
are also forced to ask for a revision
of the present mill tax.
All Colleges Share
Of the total of $8,690,000 asked of
the legislature, $7,490,000 is for build-
1gs, including all equipment, and
$1,200,000 is for the purchase of land.
All campus ground and with one ex-
ception, every site now owned by the
University is filled. It is essential
that more land be obtained at once
in order to take 'care of future ex-
pansion of the University.
, The budget includes an appropria-
tion for practically every cdllege in
the University as well as large sums
ofr the new University hospital, a new
museum, a model high school, in-
creases to the ,chemical laboratory,
and new buildings at the biological
station-at Camp Dodge.
AUSTRIAN STIIIENT FUND
DIlL' IS SUCCESSFUL
COLLECTION WILL BE TAKEN
FOLLOWING SERVICES
TODAY
A 60 per cent over-subscription was
secured in the drive to aid needy Aus-
trion students, which was conducted
yesterday on the campus by Sphinx,
junior literary honor society.
This result is considered especially

gratifying, according to those in
charge, especially since there have
been so many charity campaigns here
in the past few days. The campaign
was run with the idea that the money
given would be in the form of a
Thanksgiving offering.
In connection with thes drive it
mfght be proper to mention that the
University has received a card
from a German college professor in
Munich, appealing for aid. He states
that his wife and children are in dire
need of food and that it is impossible
to secure it there. He has directed his
appeals to fellow professors here. He
ha studied in this country and has
completed several works of literature.
The postal card is addressed "To the
Respected Ann Arbor University of
Michigan, North America."
A last effort will be made today to
secure some additional funds by tak-
ing a collection outside of Hill au-
ditorium following the Thanksgiving
services today.

CHEW'S STATEMENT HAS PECULIAR
MEANING IN ORIENT--PROF. ADAMS

That the statement made by Ng
Poon Chew in his lecture Tuesday
evening that "In the Versailles treaty
can be found the seed of a great Asi-
atic wa-r" contains the same quality
of truth as would be contained in a
statement that the harsh and mercan-
tilistic features of the treaty of Ver-
sailles are sure to bring about anoth-
er European war, is the opinion of
Prof. Henry C. Adams, of the politi-
cal economy department. When in-
terviewed in regard to Chew's state-
ment, Professor Adams said:
"Whatever may happen in the fu-
ture to place before the nations of the
world new ideas and new aspirations,
it is certainly true that as it now
stands the treaty of Versailles is an
TWO AENDMENTS
Empower Legislature to Fix Working
Hours for Men, Women and
Children
PROVIDE THAT CITIZENSHIP
BE COMPLETED OR LOSE VOTE
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Nov. 24.-Final canvass of
ballots cast in the recent election dis-
closed today that two of the proposed
amendments to the state constitution
had passed. One empowers the legisla-
ture to fix hours of labor of men, as
well as women and children, and the
other would require voters now exer-
cising the right by virtue of first nat-
uralization papers to complete their
citizenship by Jan. 1, 1924, or forfeit
their right of suffrage. It also pro-
vides for absentee voters.
Effective Dec. 2
The amendments appfoved become
effective on Dec 2.
Examination of the complete re-
turns revealed that Wayne county had
given a majority of 58,141 for the la-
bor amendment and that other of the
larger counties where there is a big
labor vote had given similar majori-
ties for this proposal.
On the showing of the amendment's
incompleted canvass last Tuesday it
had been generally supposed that all
five of the proposed amendments had
been voted down.
Canvass Ended Today
The work of the canvassing board
was completed late today upon re-
ceipt of reports by wire from election
boards which had failed to submit
their final accounts earlier in the
week.
Final figures yon the anti-parochial
school amendment were 353,817 for,
and 610,699 against.
The majority given the Republican
presidential electors was shown to be
in excess .of 530,000.
UNION DANCE AND CHURCH
PARTY TODAY'S ATTRACTION
Many of the students who will re-
main in Ann Arbor for Thanksgiving
plan to drive away the "homesick
blues" at the Union general member-
ship dance in the afternoon, or at the
Congregational students' party. Tick-
ets to the Union dance have been sold
out, and more than 100 have signified
their intention of attending the Con-
gregational entertainment. Those who
are going to the latter will meet at the
church at 3:30 o'clock, to stat on the
hay rack ride, which will be follow-
ed by an oyster supper at 6:30 o'clock
and a social in the evening.

THANKSGIVING PARTY GIVEN
FOR HOSPITAL CHILDREN
Children at the Homoeopathic hos-
pital were entertained at a Thanks-
giving party yesterday afternoon by
the Homoeopathic circle of King's
Daughters. Refreshment were served.
Today all adult patients will be
given cards, significent of Thanksgiv-
ing day, with illustrated quotations
from standard authors.
NO DAILY TOMORROW
The Daily will not publish an
edition tomorrow on account of
the Thanksgiving holiday.

expression of the dominant purpose
of the strong and victorious nations
of the world, and contains no promise
of peace; on the contrary when one
views it in the light of certain phas-
es of past history it does contain the
germs of international strife.
Nothing which it contains suggests
that the political policy of mercantil-
ism, or of the economic doctrine that
gives that policy its structure, has
lost its influence over the minds
of modern statesman. Mercantilism
seems as strong as it was in the sev-
enteenth century, and there is no'
ground to hope for peace as long as
that false nationality engendered by
mercantilism maintains its influence."
Exected Much
In the Orient, however, in the opin-
ion of Professor Adams, the state-
ment of Mr. Chew has a peculiar{
meaning.t
"China," he declared, ."expected
from the peace cofiference some sort
of guarantee that she would be left
undisturbed to consumate herandus-
trial transformation, a transforma-
tion which for many reasons will re-
quire years of devoted work and ef-
fort. I cannot dwell on this, nor on
the claim felt so strongly in China,
that her civilization has merits which
ought not to be lost in her accept-]
ance of Western industrial methods.
There are those who believe that thiss
civilization has more to fear from;
contact with Japan than from con-t
tact with European nations and the
United States. This group of think-I
ers also believe that the treaty of Ver-
sailles virtually turned China over to
Japan as a special sphere of exploi-
tation.
China Disorganized
Although China at present is dis-1
organized, thinkers . have confidence
in her ability to grow into a warlikel
nation should her interests and po-
litical environment so decree, and no
one who knows her can doubt this
ability. Looked at in this way one
can but have great solicitude for the
future of the Orient. It may be this
situation was in Mr. dhew's mind
when he said that the treaty of Ver-
sailles held the seeds of an Asiatic
war, and if so his forecast was well
founded. At least it is an observation
which might well claim the thought
of conservative statesmen."''
PRESS CLUB MEETS HERE
FIRST OF NEXT MONTH
SCHERMERHORN WILL SPEAK*;
PROF. BRUMM TO PRESENT
CONSTITUTION
Following the purpose of "meeting
for the mutual benefit of the editors
of the state and the University," the
second annual convention of the Uni-
versity Press club of Michigan will be
held here Dec. 1, 2 and 3.
Last year, when the newspaper
men of the state met in Ann Arbor,1
it was decided to permanently organ-
ize a press club in order to ."foster,
a close relationship between the press
of the state and the University in or-
der that the resources of each might
be open to the other."
Speakers for the meeting have been
selected, and as far as possible men
who are interested in newspaper work
have been chosen. At the opening
meeting to be held Wednesday night
in the form of a smoker, James
Schermerhorn of the Detroit Times

will speak.
An address will*e given Thursday
morning by President Marion L. Bur-
ton. Following this, the convention
will hold its business session and
pass on a constitution which has been
drawn up by Prof. John L. Brumm;,
head of the department of journalism
in the University, and Harley John-
son, managing editor of the Ann Ar-
bor Times News, who are acting as
president and secretary of the organi-
zation, respectively.
The following day will be occupied
with addresses igiven by various mem-
bers of the University faculty, end-
ing with a banquet at the Union.
Professor Brumm emphasizes the
fact that students of the University,
whether or not taking courses in
journalism, are invited and welcome
at all of the open sesions during the
convention.

HIGH SCHOOL GRID
TEAMS WILL MEET
Week End Match May Decide Scholas-
tic Championship; Upper Pen-
insula Squad Out
NORTHWESTERN TO BATTLE
LANSING HIGH SATURDAY
In a game which may decide the
state high school football champion-
ship, Detroit Northwestern will meet
Lansing this Saturday on Ferry field.
Whether or not this will prove to be
the crucial battle for the state title
will depend upon whether or not Mus-
kegon is defeated by Grand Rapids
Central in the game at Grand Rapids
today.
Competition for the championship
rests with lower peninsula teams,
since Menominee, champions of the

MANY ADDITIONS
MADE TO FACULTY
Additions to the faculty were heav-
ier at the beginning of this year t'ian
last, according to Registrar Arthur
G. Hall. One hundred and twenty-
five instructors have been added to the
staff, as well as 26 assistant profes-
sors, one associate professor and one
full professor.
Last year a large number of in-
structors had to be added to take care
of an exceptionally large freshman
class. This sane number is now able,
to handle the class of '24, which is
practically the same size as the 1919
freshman class. The big demand for
additional instructors came this year
with the return of a large proportion
of the sophomore class, and more par-
ticularly in the economics depart-
ment.
GENEO~TYBEST
IRISH STTEMN
--VISCOUNT GREY.
Makes Appeal in House of Lords to.
*ashion Acceptable
, ~Measure1

STEINER'S TALK
SAID0 TO CARRY
ViTAL MESSAG
WILL SPEAK AT 11 O'CLOCK '
DAY IN HILL AUDITOR.
IUM
UNIVERSITY AND CITY
TO JOIN IN SERVICE

Selected Chorus of Mixed
Render Anthem; Mrs.
to Sing

Voices
Wheele)

upper peninsula, wired the local
dent committee in charge, that
team had been disbanded.
Muskegon Undefeated

stu-
her

As the records stand. Muskegon
is the only undefeated team in the
lower peninsua. However, this is no
true indication of the team's strength,
since it has played a rather light
schedule.- In case Muskegon does win
over Grand Rapids Central, a game
will be arranged between the Mus-
kegon team and the winner of the
game here Saturday.
It is a difficult matter to predict the
winners of the Northwestern-Lansing
contest. The situation is this:'
Northwestern has defeated Northern,
Northern has won over Arthur Hill,
and Arthur Hill in turn has defeated
Lansing.
Dope Given
On the other hand Lansing has de-
feated Grand Rapids Central, Grand
Rapids Central emerged victors from
a contest with Saginaw Eastern, and
the latter team defeated Detroit
Northwestern. The most logical pre-
diction seems to be that it will be a
hard fought game with neither team
having any advantage.
Officials for the game were an-
nounced yesterday as follows: .Coach
Derrill Pratt, referee; Coach Mather,
umpire; and Director Olds, of Ann
Arbor high school athletics, head
linesman.
The game is to begin at 2 o'clock
and admission will be 75 cents.
Louvain Library
-eing -Restocked

"SHOULD PROFIT BY AMERICAN
LESSON," SAID THE SPEAKER
(By Associated Press)
London, Nov. 24.--Te debate in
the House of Lords on" Irish Home
Rule, tonight, was made memorableE
by a notable appeal from Viscount
Grey, former secretary of foreign af-
fairs, to the government for an elev-
enth hour attempt, by generosity to
Ireland, to fashion the bill to an ac-
ceptable measure.
. In a speech displaying no resent-
ments and taking full account of the.
government's extreme difficulties inl
Ireland, he urged that unless the gov-9
ernment was able to secure effective]
control in Ireland it would be better
to withdraw all the armed forces and,
let Ireland mind her own salvation.
To Adjourn Fortnight]
Whether the appeal will be heeded,'
time will show, but it is significantl
that Earl Middleton intends tomorrowi
to move adjournment for a fortnight,
to allow the government time to con-I
sider what amendments, financial and
otherwise, it will propose.
Alluding in his speech to foreign
opinon, Lord Grey said he hoped the
government would endeavor to make
the bill sufficiently generous to ap-
peal to all moderate opinion.
" 'We have the greatest empire In the
world," he declared, "but it has not
been without its adverses. We lost
America through not giving in in
time and not giving enough. Have we
ever in our history lost through giv-
ing too much?"
Success If Improved
As it stood the bill would only mean
trouble in Ireland, but, if it was im-
proved, there was a real prospect of
success, he declared.
The most conspicuous incident in
the House of Commons was the rev-
elation by Sir Greenwood, chief sec-
retary for Ireland, of Sinn Fein plans
to destroy property in Liverpool and
Manchester.
WOMEN SUPPORT
RED CROSS DRIVE
Red Cross membership among the
University women has. now reached
a total of .800. Campaign plans in-
cluded an effort to have all sororities,
dormitories, and league houses 100 per
cent Red Cross. The last report adds
the following to the former list: Al-
pha Xi Delta, Alpha Phi, Pi Beta Phi,
Zeta Tau Alpha, Episcopal dormitory
and the following league houses: Ap-
tel4 Beebee, Brownihall, Comstock, Cal-
houn, both Freeman houses, Hickman,
Fawcett, Horen, McLeod, Mogk, Mar-
tin, Seidler, Stowe, Walker, and Whit-
comb.

"A new Heart for An Old World," is
the subject of the address to be give
by Prof. Edward Alfred Steiner, o
Grinnell college, at the University
community Thanksgiving service tc
be held at 11 o'clock this morning i
Hill auditorium.
Distinguished as a speaker, news
paper writer, student of immigratio
problems, and as the author of many
books on the subject of lour foreig
element, Professor Steiner comes t
Ann Arbor with an address which, i
is claimed, will bring a vital messag
to his hearers.
Robert F. Grindley, '21E, will have
charge of the service. Music wil
be in the hands of Prof. Wiliia
Wheeler, of the School of Music. A
Felected chorus of mixed voices wil
render an anthem,; and Mrs. Willian
Wheeler will sing. Earl V. Moore, o:
the School of Music, will be the or
ganist.
Prayer and scripture reading wil
be! given by the Rev. J. M. Wells, o
the Baptist church.
The program for the service fol
lows: Ogran prelude, "Laudate Dom
inum," Sheldon; hymn, "America";
prayer; anthem, "Fear Not Ye O Is
real," Spicker; scripture reading
soprano solo. "A Song of Thanksgiv
ing," Allitsen; address, "A Nov
Heart for An Old World"; hymn
"Manoah"; benediction; organ post
lude, "Thanksgiving Toccato," Dem
arest.
"MAE PLANS,"1 SAYS
PRESIDENT IN ADORES
RURTON TELLS SOPHS TO MAK]
MOST OF SELVES BY AID-
ING OTHERS
"There are two distinct types o
people in this world," said Presiden
Marion L. Burton in his lecture to th
sophomores yesterday afternoon i:
Hill auditorium, "those who plan an
those who merely drift along, doin
things in a haphazard way. Howeve
a real man or real woman must, t
amount to something, plan for the fi
ture, plan to make the most of th
qualities they now possess, and abo
all manage to make the most c
themselves by helping every othe
person to forward his ambitions."
Attainment Klls
President Burton went on to sa
that there was no plan worth a
tempting unless, at the start, on
knew that he could never do i
'Don't let me confuse you," he sail
"but try to realize that any plai
which is real, is one that you can fou
ever be striving for. After all, w
only live life by escaping the deat
of attainment. The man who say
'I've done it' is already dead. If V
knew everything there was to kno
and had done everything there was I
do in this world, would life really 1
worth living?"
Opportunities Open
The President then gave severale:
amples of real {loyalty, where m4
have had plans, goals, ambitions
whatever one cares to call themx-
and, that ambition taken away, the
no longer cared to live.
"Everyone of us should have som
thing in our lives that grips us, som
thing for which we would give 01
all, something around which we ci
build our dreams of what we hope
be. And the world today is 3ui
bristling with opportunity for the m

or woman who can think, who cz
* plan, who is loyal," stated Preside
Burton..

Louvain, Belgium, Nov. 24.-Person-E
al libraries of German savants are be-9
ing purchased to restock the shelves
of the Louvain library looted by the
Germans in the war. The German
professors are hard hit by heavy taxa-
tion and the high cost of living and
many rare and valuable volumes have
thus come into the market.
M. Louis Stainier; director of the'
library restoration committee, told a
correspondent of the London Daily
News here that Louvain was very
greatful for the consignment of books
from American well-wishers although'
as he put it, the American collection
being an essentially modern one, had
more of a "universal" than a "uni-
versity" character.
No building yet exists in Louvain
adequate to receive the new librar
and the books thus far obtained, in-
cluding 35,000 volumes from England
are scattered- wherever temporary ac-
commodation can be found for them.
SOCIALIST SOCIETY WILL
BE ADDRESSED BY BELGIAN
Dr. Henry De Man, director of the
Belgian board of labor education and
member of the royal Belgian com-
mission on industrial management.
will address the Intercollegiate Soci-
alist society at 8 o'clock tomorrow
night in the Natural Science auditor-
ium. His subject will be: "The So-
cialist Future of Europe."
Dr. De Man was twice sent to this
country by the Belgian governmen
to investigate industrial relations,
with the purpose of securing ideas for
the industrial reconstruction of his
own country. He is now investigating
social conditions on his own account.
Admission to the lecture will be 25
cents.,

SOPH LIT NOTICE
All mnemllers of the sophomore
literary class are requested to
pay their dues,,$1 a year or 50,
cents a semester, at the booth
opposite the registrar's office to-
morrow from 2 to 5 o'clock.
ROBERT D. GIBSON,
Treasurer.

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