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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 26, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I tHL IVRH1GAIN VAIL Y

-...

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretton of the Editor, if left at or maild to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor.........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-.W iccc
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
B. P. Campbell J. E. McManis
J. I. Dakin T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
Sunday Editor.............................J. A. Bernstein
Editorials..........Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, T. J. Whinery
Assistant News...................,............E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
Sports .........................Robert Angell
Women's Editor...... ....................... Mary D. Lane
Telegraph........................West Gallogly
Telescope...............................Jack W. Kelly

Josephine Waldo
Paul G. Weber
Almena Barlow
Elizabeth Vickery
G. E. Clark
George Reindel
Dorothy Monfort
Harry B., Grundy

Assistants
Frances Oberholtzer
Robert E. Adams
Norman C. Damon
Byron Darnton
Thomas F. Dewey
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer

L. Armstrong Kern
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
Gerald P. Overton
E dward ambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Waller

t

, _.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 964)
BUSINESS MANAGER........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising ...................-........-.-D. P Joyce
Classifieds ............... .............I........... Robt. 0. Ker
Publication............ ..------. M. Heath
Accounts ........................................E4. R. Prielis
Circulation...................... -...............V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht P. H. Hutchinson N. . Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos, L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. M worth D.. Slawson
J. J. Hamel Jr D-.Watrot

The night editors for the week are: Monday
night, Hugh Hitchcock; Tuesday night, Thornton
Sargent, Jr.; Wednesday night, Thomas Adams;
Thursday night, Brewster Campbell; Friday
night, Jack Dakin; Saturday night, John McMans.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1920.
There will be a meeting of the entire editorial
staff at 4:30 this afternoon.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY
The College of Pharmacy was opened in 1860 as
a part of the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts. In 1876 it was made a separate depart-
ment. At first only one year's work was required
for graduation, but later this was changed to two
years and now a full four year course is neces-
sary. The degree of Ph.C. is given.
AN END TO SCALPING
News that an outsider who is said to have been
an elderly man in good circumstances was arrested
and fined for scalping on tickets for the Illinois
game will come with considerable relish to the
many who are rightly angered at the spectacle of
an athletic contest bf the University of Michigan
sullied by such a practice. Students, outsiders,"or
professionals who are guilty of such an act are
liable to punishment and should be taught the les-
son that Ann Arbor is no place for the speculator
in pasteboards. The arrest is gratifying as an in-
dication that the law is going to be administered
to the full.'
The scalper today should be as much of a fossil
as his redman predecessor. There was a time when
his tricks were passed over, and when World Se-
ries games were havens of joy for the ticket prof-
iteer. But the light of publicity has pointed out the
evil effects of his misdemeanor, and even in pro-
fessional circles the heavy hand of the law has
fallen. That scalping should ever be practiced by
students, even sub rosa, would be a reflection on
Michigan which every man and woman in the
University comnmunity should- resent by aiding in
running down the offenders. When a student signs
his name to his application for a ticket, he agrees
to forfeiture of his privileges in case he sells that
ticket above its value. The law has plainly an-
nounced that the offense comes under its jurisdic-
tion, and individuals caught at it will have only
themselves to blame.
KNOW THEIR MEANING
Traditions must be followed or else they die. In
this way customs which have not been in accord
with what has come to be recognized as true Mich-
igan spirit have disappeared. But to be correctly
followed and perpetuated those traditions which
have proved their worth must be thoroughly under-
stood and their significance appreciated by each
successive class. It is paramount that the fine old
traditions which have been constantly accumulat-
ing since Michigan began be carried down in spirit
as well as letter.
Por this reason next Thursday, Traditions Day, is
one of the cardinal days on our college calendar.
Then the whole student body will unite in an ef-
fort to better realize what Michigan traditionsJ
mean and to bring their significance to the newest1

class to enter the University. Every upperclass-
man-should bring his freshman friends to this
program at Hill auditorium and it is the duty of
every freshman, as a loyal Michigan student, to at-
tend.
THE 1920 CONCERTS
Nature bestows musical ability on very few of
us; but fortunately she blesses most of us with the
gift of its appreciation in others. Of course the
terpsichorean desires of some are satisfied by the
jazz band, but the great majority can appreciate and
do enjoy good music, In response to the demand for
this majority, concert series have been arranged for
many years past by Professor Stanley, by which
students are enabled to hear at Ann Arbor many
of the most famous contemporary artists and or-
chestras. The perpetuation of these concerts dur-
ing a period of forty-two years has been the best
evidence of their success on the campus.
On October 29, the first concert of the 1920 se-
ries will be given under the auspices of the Uni-
vers~ity School of Music. Incidentally that date
marks the beginning of the final season of enter-
prises arranged by Professor Stanley, ending with
the May Festival next spring. In view of this
fact, the best obtainable talent has been booked up,
with a variety of program that should satisfy every
taste, and every possible effort has been put forth
to make this a banner year in the musical circles
of Ann Arbor. To enumerate here names of ar-
tists which have been bywords in American house-
holds and which have been posted for a number of
weeks past, would be useless. But suffice it to
say that to those who care for music, this season
will furnish delightful entertainment beyond the
approach of any previous year.
STUDENT CONTROL OF ACTIVITIES
Presidnt Burton, in one of his addresses,
stated that it would be the policy of the new ad-
minstration to give the students practically unlim-
ited control of their activities. The plan is not an
anomaly at Michigan, and the wisdom of it has
already been proven. We do not think that it
would be an exaggeration to attribute the success
of the Michigan Union to the fact that it is man-
aged almost entirely by students.
We, of th student body, look upon this great
institution of the Union as ours, we commend its
virtues and criticize in a friendly way its short-
comings. The very interest that we take in its suc-
cess thwarts the possibility of failure. Whatever
is controlled by students tends naturally to pro-
mote the interest of students. President Burton is
to be congratulated for resuming on a larger scale
the policy of giving the undergraduates control of
all activities, bringing as little outside pressure to
bear as possible.
The Telescope
Epitaph
Here lies my loving little wife,
My darling Ellen Grace.
I only hope Up There she's issued
A darned sight better face.
Help! Help! Help the Telescope
One of our readers wanted to know why we so
often headed this column with an epitaph and we
told him that good form required that the epitaph
generally be placed at the head of the dead one.
What say, ye contributors?
Dear Noah:
Is it true that Biblical characters in olden times
were never troubled by sickness? F. D.
Decidedly not. The Good Rook in plain Eng-
lish tells us that the Lord on one occasion gave
Moses two tablets.
Our girl has an aunt who isan actress and she
never tires of harping on the histronic ability of
this said aunt. The other night sheremarks to us,

"My aunt is a great actress and if I wanted to I
could have learned to be an actress for nothing."
Now we've got just as much family pride as the
next one so we comes back with,
"That's nothing. -My dad is a preacher and I
could have been good for nothing."
And after that could you blame us much for
laughing at our own jest?
The Black Sheep
Old alumnus-Say, whatever became of the Bul-
ger family?
His friend-Why, they all did well except Harry.
You l*Now they all went to Michigan, where Bill
graduated from the Law school, Joe from the
Medical college and May from the School of
Music.
Alumnus-That's a mighty fine record. And
what became of Harry?
. Friend-He never amounted to much. Why
right now he isn't making even enough to support
Bill and Joe and May.
Speaking of the stuff that heroes are made of,
don't overlook the bird who promptly removes his
coat at a "pep" meeting, although knowing full
well beforehand that he hasn't changed his shirt
for a week.
Famous Closing Liies
"There's nothing new under the sun," muttered
"Doc" as he picked up the student's clothes.
NOAH COUNT.

Both Ends
DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. in. and hourly toA
9:10 p. in.
Liniteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. in. and e;ry two
hours to 9:48 p.,im.
L ocals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.n. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S
1 2
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Gargoyle Delayed; to Appear Oct. 28
Due to delays in printing the Gar-
goyle, which failed to appear for sale
on the campus Oct. 20, will be placed
on sale Thursday morning. All try-
outs for the Gargoyle are requested
to report at the offices in the Press
building between 1 and 5 o'clock any
afternoon.
Did you say "Baby Dolls." Where
At the Whitney Theater, Nov. 4th and
5th.-Adv.
- My Diylunch:
I.
~-Our food is the best
- Our prices are right
Open Dail7 A, to 1 AM
Sundays 8 to 2 - 5 P.Mto
512 EAST WILLIAM STREET
E.NUS
PENCILS
FjOR the student or prof.,
-'the superb VENUS out-
rivals all for perfect pencil
work. 17 black degrees and
3 copying.

American Lead
Pencil Co. .~
ntzoFifYthAve.
NewYorL t
3 TA
"MASTER
CLEANINC
S E R V ICDE"
4 1
". . t'?:';"; F :ic
Phones
1890
1891
Wek Call for and Deliver

RA
(Two Stores)'
of the Diagonal Walk

4-J 0 Lo b
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b10.
t-1 4 & ; U
N > ' .tea
U2 oy"a , a°
~% ~(I~E44

J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street
ANN ARBOR, - - MICHIGAN 1

Sleep Anyplace l ut
IEat at Rex'9s
THE CLUB LUNCH
Iea12 A BOR STREET
Near State and Packard

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-Up the

Stairs

in Nickel's Arcade

TO THE

Arcade Cafeteria

Where you may select your meal from
a forty-foot table steaming with a va-
riety of all kinds of pure food delicious-
ly cooked by experts. Bakery goods
fresh from our own ovens.
Our Special Blend of Coffee with Jer-

sey cream is exceptional.

Economy of

Cafeteria

service

ena-

bles us to serve at low prices.

C. J. FINGERLE.

1

Dinner 11:30 to 1 P. M.

Supper 5:30 to 7 P. M.

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