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October 26, 1920 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DEFEAT LAID TO
NMBEHRCUSES
Yost Beaten by One Point for First
Time In 24 Years of
Coaching
OTTPUNTING OF M.ICHIGAN
ONE OF PRINCIPAL FACTORS
(By Thornton Sargent)
A missed goal after touchdown cost
Michigan a tie decision in its most
important game of the season, and
for the first time In 24 years of his
coaching Yost had a team beaten by
such a narrow margin.
Several breaks against Michigan
and for Michigan went to make up
this game, which to a certain extent
illustrated two types of coaching. Of
first importance was Frank Steketee's
inability to start the game. If the
Wolverine toe artist had been in
shape, Michigan would not have been
outkicked, and the play would have
been nearer the center of the field
and perhaps on Wolverine ground,
where it would have been possible to
open up more.
Wieman's Injury Blow
The most serious blow was the in-
jury to Tad Wieman, whose knee was
twice thrown out, so that he may not
be in shape until the Ohio game.
Even with Steketee out, the Michigan
tackle could have done the punting
in place of Dunn, who was going
badly, and kicked the goal from
touchdown.
Considerable criticism of Yost has
been heard because he failed'to send
in a place kicker to make the needed
goal. This is justified to some ex-
tent but the coach cannot be held
altogether to blame for Goebel had
been practised at goal kicking, with
Dunn holding the ball.
Team Excited
If the team had not been thrown
out' of its head by the unexpected
touchdown, Goebel would have been
called to kick goal, and the ball
would have been directed safely by
Dunn, an expert in this line. As it
developed, no member of the team
was thinking sanely, and before bet-
ter thought could prevail, the goal
had been missed by Dunn with Per-
rin holding the ball, neither of
whom were practised in assuming
their particular parts.
Michigan's being outpunted was
most probably the main reason for
defeat. This factor in Illinois' favor
let them have the ball, where they
could open up, and they opened up
with everything they had, while Mich-
igan played mostly straight football.
Despite 'their open and weird attack,
the Indians could register only one
counter against the alert Michigan
defense, which played wonderful foot-
ball.
Tripping Unintentional
Walquist's apparent tripping of
Perrin was not intentional. As Jack
headed down the field, Walquist cut
over, and as he got near the Michi-
gan back, he expected Perrin to cut
back instead of going straight down
the side line. To prevent Jack's
sidestepping, Walquist threw himself
back to block Perrin, but Jack was
going so fast that only his feet
caught him and tripped the Michigan
runner.
While a victory would have been
more satisfactory, Michigan with the
breaks against them can be well sat-
isfied with the game. Illinois' much
vaunted team was practically stop-

ped, and Yost showed that he has
developed a powerful aggregation.

With all of Zuppke's wizardry and
tricks, Michigan successfully stopped
them at almost every point of the
game. Illinois showed only sufficient
strength to win by a narrow margin
with two of Michigan's best men out.
Their team was strong, undoubtedly
the strongest in the Conference this
year, and it was certainly no disgrace
to be beaten by such a close score.
FIV , OUT OF SIX
HARRIERS PICKED
As a result of the cross country
trials held Saturday morning Coach
Steve Farrell has selected five of the
six men who will represent Michigan
at Lafayette next Saturday when Wol-
verine and Purdue harriers race over
a five mile course. The five men who
are assured of their positions on the
team are Houfstater, Freeborn, Whit-
temore, Standish, and Penberthy, and
from four others the sixth man will
be selected. These four are Chute,;
Braman, VandeVisse, and Howard.
They will cover the course sometime
this week.
Victory in Saturday morning's try-
outs went to Leland, a freshman, who
covered the course in fast time. Le-
land shows great promise of future3
development and should be of great
value to Coach Farrell in future
years.
Steve is well satisfied with the
showing of the men. But one of
those who will make the trip to Pur-
due was on last year's team, and all
of the new men showed decisively
that they deserve their places.
The University Music House an-
nounces the arrival of a limited num-
ber of the Victor Record, "Victors and
Varsity." Will parties who left orders
kindly call for them.-Adv.

INITIAL BA9SKETBALL
DRILLHELD MONDAY
Basketball practice has commenced.
In response to Coach Mather's first
call for candidates some 35 men re-
ported for the first workout last eve-
ning. Many more are expected to re-
port in the course of the week. This
number will be more than doubled in
the opinion of the coach as soon as it
is generally known that practice has
begun in earnest.
Practice Every Evening
From now on there will be practice
every evening at 7 o'clock and it is
urged that all candidates report at
once. Work is beginning this year
earlier than ever before in order that
Coach Mather may get a line on the
material that he will have and also
that he may have ample time to de-
velop new men. Anyone who has play-
ed the game at all is urged to report
at Waterman gymnasium.
Fortunately the coach will have
more material to work with this year
than last when he was called upon to
develop practically all green men.
Last year's freshman team will furn-
ish a number of candidates who are
sure to make strong bids for Varsity
positions. In addition, the old squad
is fairly well intact. Of course, a
number of men are out for football
at the present time but at the close
of the gridiron season, these men will
undoubtedly report to the basketball
mentor.
Will Drill in Rudiments
Practice for some time will be de-
voted to the fundamentals. Coach
Mather is insistent that his squad
will be thoroughly grounded in the'
rudiments of the game. It is his in-
tention that these preliminary fea-

tures shall occupy most of the time
for the first mouth.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA BEATS
SIGMA NU, 19 TO 12, MONDAY
Lambda Chi Alpha defeated Sigma
Nu yesterday in the first of the inter-
fraternity football contests by the
score of 19 to 12. Ross, quarterback,
and Willis, halfback, were the point
getters for Lambda Chi while Pierce,
end, and Wheeler, half, played well
for Sigma Nu. An extra quarter was
required to decide the game.
Theta Chi was awarded a game by
default when Theta Xi failed to ap-
pear.
The second and third days schedule
for the interfraternity football games
have been announced by the intramur-
al department. On Tuesday at 3:45
o'clock Delta Tau Delta will meet Phi
Delta Theta and the Nu Sigma Nu
eleven will line up against the Theta
Delta Chi warriors.
On Wednesday afterneon beginning
at the same hour as previous games,
the Trigons will play Phi Kappa Sig-
ma, Delta Chi will battle Sinfonia,
and Alpha Delta Phi will try to de-
fend its title won last year against
Psi Upsilon.
Class managers as soon as they are
elected are requested to report to the
intramural office and receive instruc-
tions for the season. Class games
will start the latter part of the week
according to Assistant Director Fred
Fletcher.
Dr. Vaughana Leaves on N. Y. Visit
Dr. Vaughan, dean of the Medical
school, left Monday afternoon for New
York City, where he will attend a
meeting of the international health
board, of which he is a member. He
will return to Ann Arbor on Wednes-
day.

-
t

BEATH, '1E, WITHDRAWS NAME
FROM FOOTBALL MANAGER RACE
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I hereby withdraw my name from
the nomination for football manager
of the senior engineering class. If
elected, I feel- that I would not have
the time to conscientiously perform
the duties required of me.
PHIL BEATH, '21E.
Michigan Daily liners bring re-
sults.--Adv.
Ready to Serve
AT ANY TIME
Open from 11.1 p.m.-5-7 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
45 cents
CHINESE and AMERICAN StIl
Short Orders
Quang TugsLo
613 E. Liberty St

VAN'S LUNCH

I

11'

I

I

)

'

'God bless the Churches and

blessed be God, who in this
great trial giveth us the
Churches."
Christian Day Schools
Strengthen and perpetuate the
Churches, and they foster good
citizenship.
The School mend-
ment Says:
"All residents of the State of

- :

-

"_Makes Jack a Dull Boyl"
Jack and Tom and Harry get
to be very dull chaps, indeed, if
they believe in all work and -no
play.
Men who want to keep their
minds keen and their wits
sharp, know that they must play
to keep fit for the terrific strain
of modern life.
If your "prof" is wise he will
heartily approve of your play-
ing an occasional game of bil-
liards.' Come in tonight-get a
good cue in your hands again-
and see how soon your former
skill comes back to you.
HUS TON BROS.
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Soft Drinks and Light Lunches.
Cigars and Candies, Cigarettes
and Pipes.
"We Try to Treat You Right"

Vote

NO

Michigan, between the ages of
five years and sixteen years,
shall attend the public school
in their respective districts un-
til they have graduated from
the eighth grade." It therefore
wantonly attacks and aims to
destroy the Christian Schools.
It cannot fail to work great
harm to the Churches, do griev-
ous wrong to loyal citizens and
endanger the peace and order
of our land.

ON THE SCHOOL
AMENDMENT

LUTHERAN CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE

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