100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 26, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER ASSOCIATED
RAIN; CONTINUED COLD DAY AND NIGHT WiE
TODAY 1.ANNARBrtUSERVICE
VOL. XXXI. No. 19. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1920. PRICE IVE C]

ITF
DEATH ENDS LORD
MAYORM'S WINEY'S
LONG FOOD STRIKEI
RECEIVED TWO YEAR SENTENCE
FOR FEDERAL CHARGES
UNEXPECTED
END NOT UNEXPECTED;
UNCONSCIOUS FOR DAYS
Cork Executive Terribly Emaciated
as Result of Long Hunger
Strike
(y Associated Press)
London, Oct. 25.-Clarence Mac-
Swiney, lord mayor of Cork, and the
most prominent of the Irish hunger
strikers, and said to be the brains of
the republican army in Ireland, died
early today in Brixton prison.
The end was not unexpected, for
the lord mayor has been unconscious
for several days. He was entering up-
on the 74th day of his hunger strike,
as a protest against a two year sen-
tence for federal charges, including
one of having seditious documents in
his possession.
Lord Mayor Emaciated
The lord mayor, who was terribly
emaciated as a result of his long ab-
stinence from food, had been deliri-
ous for many hours, and was uncon-
scious when death came.
It was several hours after the lord
mayor died before the news was tak-
en to Mrs. MacSwiney. She immedi-
ately went to the prison accompan-
ied by her parents, MacSwiney's sis-
ter and the family group, stoical and
dry-eyed, she prayed over the body
as it lay on a cot.
No Unwarranted Excitement
There was no unwarranted excite-
ment outside the prison when the
news of MacSwiney's death became
generally known. A large force of
police had been concentrated to put
down any disorder that might occur.
It is well within the possibilities
that the body will be taken to Cork
secretly, in order to avoid unpleas-
ant results, from whatver demonstra-
tion might be arranged in England
and Ireland along the route traveled
by the train. There is no intimation
that any official advocates refusal to
send it to Cork. It is, however, in
the powers of the home office to give
up the body of a prisoner in what-
ever way it is deemed most expe-
dient.
CARELESSNESS FIRE CIUSE
Blazes of Last Few Days Due to Cigar-
ette Butts, Pardon Thinks
That the fires of the past few days
have been the result of carelessness
on part of Instructors, is the opinion
of E. C. Pardon, superintendent of the
buildings and grounds department.
"Fires have been started In the past
by cigarette butts carelessly thrown
into wastepaper baskets," said Su-
perintendent. Pardon. "In my opin-
ion, it is not altogether unlikely that
some of the fires of the past few days
were caused by the same source."
This statement is borne out by the
fact that two fires in the main build-
ing were in the desks of instructors.

A thorough investigation is to be
made by the building and grounds
department and steps will be taken
immediately to prevent any further
fires.
Soccer Game Called Off
On account of the failure of the
South African soccer team to appear,
the game scheduled Monday with the
South American team was necessarily'
called off.
'ENSIAN NOTICE
All organization heads should
call at the Michiganensian office
in Press building, between 2 and
4 o'clock any day this week and
sign contracts. To insure space
this should be done at once.
Fraternities and sororities are
are requested to sign and re-
turn contracts immediately.

GLEE CLUB ISSUES
CALL FOR TRYOUTS
Men Needed to Fill Shortage in First
Tenors and Second Basses
Another Glee club tryout has been
called for 7 o'clock tonight at the
Union in an effort to give all cam-
pus singers a chance to display their
voices. There is a shortage of first
tenor and second bass vocalists, and
club officials are desirous of signing
up some of these immediately.
No report has as yet been receiv-
ed from the committee on student
affairs on the proposed Glee club
minstrel show which will tour the
state during Christmas holidays, ac-
cording to present plans.
PLAN PARADE FOR
ARMISTICE DAY
Chamber of Commerce Asks All Ex-
Service Men in Ann Arbor
Fall in Line
STORES TO CLOSE AT ONE
O'CLOCK ON NOVEMBER 11

t r t

I
0
d
r
e
t:
b
a

(ING ALEXANDER
OF GREECE DIES
20 P.M. MONDAY
CONDITION PRONOUNCED HOPE.
LESS AT NOON YESTER-
DAY
DEATH DUE TO SEVERE
MONKEY BITE IN OCT.
Succeeds to Throne When Father Ad-
dicates at Demand of Three
Great Powers
(By Associated Press)
Athens, Oct. 25.-- King Alexander
>f Greece died at 5:20 o'clock Mon-
lay. His death was due to wounds
received when a, pet monkey attack-
ed him early in October, the bite be-
ng badly mutilated.
Throughout last night the heart ac-
tion grew weaker, his general debility
became more pronounced and pulmon-
ary symptoms were intense. Breath-
ing at times was most difficult and
alarming. At noon today it was an-
nounced that the king's condition was
hopeless.
Took Throne in June, 1917
Alexander succeeded to the throne
of Greece in June, 1917, when his fa-
ther, King Constantine, abdicated in
response to the demand of France,
Great Britain and Russia, the three
powers which had guaranteed the
constitutional liberties of the Greek
people.
Alexander was the second son of
Constantine and at the time of his
accession was not quite 24 years old.
His elder brother, Crown Prince
George, was considered ineligible for
the throne because of alleged pro-
German sympathies.
In any event, King Constantine
nominated Alexander to succeed him.
The fall of Constantine had been
brought about through the agency of
the French senator, M. Jonnart, who
went to Athens in June, 1917, as a
representative of the three great pow-
ers, on the ground that this step
would establish unity of feeling
among the Greeks and greater securi-'

LOCAL CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS
PLAN BIG SIX DAY DRIVE FOR $40,000

Setting its aim at acquiring a fund
of approximately $40,000, a commit-
tee composed of representatives of
the various charitable associations of
Ann Arbor will conduct a six-day
drive, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 3,
for subscriptions from students as
well as the residents. The purpose of
the campaign is to supplement with
the money donated the present inade-
quate facilities of the buildings now
housing the organizations.
Societies Number 10

the association known as the Visiting
Nurses are the more prominent, due
to the fact that they have on dif-
ferent occasions administered to the
needs of the student body. The bene-
ficial work of the Visiting Nurses was
felt in Ann Arbor during the winter
of 1918, when many cases of illness
caused by an epidemic of influenza,
among students in the S. A. T. C.,
were diligently attended by these
nurses.
The childrens' day nursery, a char-
itable institution which has been ac-
tive in Ann Arbor for 13 years, is an-
other of the organizations for whose
benefit the campaign will be held. An
increasing influx of cases of infants
who require the aid of the nursery
and demands of employes for higher
wages has caused the board of gov-
ernors to ask for larger appropria-
tions.

Among
there are
Y. W. C.

these societies, of which
10 in all, the Y. M. C. A.,
A., Salvation Army, and

BURTON SPEAKS ATI
UNION SERVICES,
"Escaping or Going Without Religion
Indefinitely Is Impossible"-
The President
MUSICAL PROGRAM GIVEN BY
SCHOOL OF MUSIC FACULTY

Plans for a parade of all
men in Ann Arbor to be
Armistice day were laid at

ex-service
held on
the meet-

ing of the Chamber of Commerce last
night. Stores will be closed at 1r
o'clock on Nov. 11, flags will be flownG
at half mast and the city will hold P
forth in a half holiday, according toe
proclamation of the mayor, if all ex--P
pectations are realized.
Hope for "Red Letter Day" C
John C. Fischer, president of thea
Chamber, is chairman of the paradeF
committee. He said last night, "We
hape to make this a red letter dayt
on the American calendar and weC
know that all the people of Ann Arbor
are behind the movement for a cele-n
bration fitting to the character of thed
day."
Emphasis was laid at the meetingt
that all ex-service men, whether res-a
idents of Ann Arbor or students ofr
the University, be urged to have theire
uniforms on hand for the parade.T
Those not having uniforms will marchs
in a separate detachment and be"
supplied with small flags.I
To Have Celebrations Elsewhere
Other cities in the state are plan-
ning similar celebrations and men inI
(harge are hoping to make the Ann
Arbor turnout show up well in the
state.
Local JMusicianst
Please In First
Sunday Concert
(By D. F. M.)
Music lovers who wandered into
Hill auditorium Sunday afternoon
were given a real treat by three mem-E
bers of the University School of Mus-
ic faculty at the first complimentaryI
recital of the year.1
Mr. William Wheeler, head of the
voice department, appeared first with
four of Liszt's song gems given in the
smooth sympathetic manner charact-
eristic of the singer. He delighted thej
audience later in the afternoon with,
several Irish songs and a selection de-
picting in music, scenes from the
years 1914 and 1915.1
Miss Marian Struble's three violin
selections and two encores received
a well earned ovation. Among them1
the low strains of Sinding's "Romance,
E minor," showed Miss Struble's in-
terpretative ability, while the young
artist's quick delicacy of touch was
demonstrated in the "Hungarian
Dance, No. 7, A major by Brahams-
Joachim."
Mr. Albert Lockwood, another local
favorite, closed the program with dif-
ficult piano selections from Beethov-
en, Liszt, and Tschaikovsky which he
handled with easy mastery.
Both Miss Struble and Mr. Wheel-
er were given admirable support by
Mrs. George Rhead, accompanist.
Cercle Francals to Meet Tonight
The first meeting of - the Cercle
Francais will be held at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in the Cercle Francais rooms.
The French facul-ty are cordially in-
vited to this meeting and the active
members are requested to be present.

Addressing a crowd of approximate-
ly 3,500 people Sunday night in Hill
auditorium, President Marion L. Bur-
ton gave what many claimed to be the
finest address of its kind ever heard
in Ann Arbor, on the subject, "The
Function of Religion in College Life."
Taking as his keynote the state-
ment that, "The function of religion in
university life is to establish its sov-
ereignity over the life of the indiv-
idual student," President Burton de-
livered an address only 30 minutes in
length, stating definitely the real pur-
pose and necessity of religion in the
life of all college students.
President Defines Religion
Beginning with a few instances and
cases of the need of students for relig-
ion from the standpoint of its strength-
ening influence in meeting the crises
which occur more frequently in col-
loge than in any other period of life,
the President defined religion as "Life
in all its relationships." Proceeding
to showthow men in their relation-
ships with their fellow men, with
themselves, with their business, their
studies and with their God, are liv-
ing religion, the speaker made it clear
that such things as escaping it or go-
ing without it indefinitely is utterly
impossible.
"True religion and true science do
not and never will conflict," was the
contention of the President in speak-
ing of the varied influences which af-
fect students when they begin to
study a little science. "Supposing
that here isgan orchid, and here is a
book telling about the orchid," he
said, "merely because in that book
there are some Inconsistencies, some
facts that are incorrect, as there al-
ways will be, should I say that I can-
not believe any of it, that the orchid
does not exist.
"Interpret as You Please"

'y for the Entente forces then operat-
ing in the East.
Alexander Not Pro-German
Constantine had been accused of
pro-German sympathies partly on ac-
count of his marriage to the Princess
Sophie, sister of the then Emperor
William of Germany, and it also was
charged that he had not acted honor-
ably toward the Allies. Alexander, on
the other hand, was reported to be
free from pro-German proclivities.
Constantine left Athens ahd took up
his residence in Switzerland.
CLASSES OF JOURNALISM IN
EXTENSION DEPT. POPULAR
Interest in classes in journalism
given in Detroit under the University
extension division has resulted in the
formation of a class of 60 students

Other Organizations Included
The other societies which will have
representatives on the campaign com-
mittee are the Old Ladies' Home, .the
clinic of St. Joseph's hospital, the
Community federation, the Humane
society, and the Ann Arbor branch of
the children's aid societies of Michi-
gan.
HON. FORONLY, MRS. YAN
YLIET, BIYK ADDRESSES
PRESENT ADMINISTRATION AR-
RAIGNED; DISCUSS LEAGUE
OF NATIONS
Approximately 100 students formed
in line behind the Varsity band and
marched to the Whitney theater last
night carrying sparklers to hear Hon.
Joseph Fordney, chairman of , the
ways and means committee, arraign
the present administration.
Statistics Given
After being introduced by James
Pollock, grad., Fordney proceeded to
give statistics showing, as he claim-
ed, the waste, extravagance and inef-
ficiency of the Wilson administration.
He said that during the war about
$51,000,000,000 was spent, which is
nearly one and one-half times more
money than was expended from the
time when Alexander Hamilton was
secretary of the treasury up to the
present. He also stated that if this
amount of money was placed in dol-
lar bills and stretched out in a car-
pet, it would cover a piece of ground
65 feet wide and 25,000 miles long.
He then attacked the present rev-
enue laws and the league of na-
tions, laying most stress on the un-
desirability of article 10.
Appeal Made to Women
Mrs. Van Vliet, candidate-for the
electoral college, spoke for a few min-
utes on the subject, "A Woman's
View Point on the League of Na-
tions." Starting with article one she
hurriedly made comments on various
articles throughout the league. She
finished her talk by appealing to the
women of Michigan to go to the polls
and vote for Harding.
PFlay (Of junior
.Girls J7fa y Be
Open To Public
This year, for the first time in Uni-
versity history, the Junior Girls' play
will probably be open to the public
in Ann Arbor, according to Prof
John R. Brumm, director of the play
Because of this fact, those in charge
are bending every effort to make th

VIGOROUS WAR.T
BE WAGED UPON
TICKET SCALPER!1
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION WIL
STAMP OUT RESELLING
AT HIGH PRICES
LOCAL POLICE FINE ONE
OFFENDER $50, COST
Notorious Pickpockets, One Wanted j
Detroit, Other in Chicago, Arrest-
ed at Illinois Game
One man was arrested, and mo
arrests are expected to follow as t
result of an active campaign wag
by the police department fand ti
Athletic association against tick
scalpers operating at the Illino
game.
Man Sells Ticket for $20
Henry Bowen, 60 years old,
Adrian, president of the Adrian I
company and director of one of ti
banks in that city, was the man a
prehended. He was caught in the a
of selling a ticket just before the ga
for $20, and was taken into cuto
by the chief of police. When arraig
ed in court yesterday, Bowen ple
guilty and was fined $50 and costs.
P. G. Bartelme, athletic direct
and Harry Tillotson of the athlei
office, were the prosecuting witness
At first, Bowen stated that he did n~
know how much the tickets we
worth, as he did not look at the pri
mark stamped upon them. When M
Bartelme asked him how much he p
for the four tickets he admitted h
ing, he declined to answer. His lat
statement that he had been attendi
football games in Ann Arbor for t
past 20 years did not support his
legation that he was not familiar wi
the price of football tickets, in t
estimation of the court.
Further Arrests Expected
"We are going to do everything
can to stamp out this illegal deali
in tickets," said Mr. Bartelme in co
menting on Saturday's events. "'I
athletic association charges what
considers a fair price, and anyc
caught in an attempt to make a. p
fit on an event given under the a
spices of the University will be pr
ecuted.
"There was some misuse made
students' tickets, and we are worki
on that now. As soon as all the fa
are known, more arrests will be ma
and the offenders will be discipli
severely."
No Robberies Reported
Two notorious pickpockets were
rested in the crowd at the game r
are being held. One is wanted
Chicago and the other in Detroit.
reports of robberies were received
the police station.
INSTITUTE CLUB
TO HEAR FERR
Ex-Governor to Make Public Add
at Whitney Theater
Woodbridge N. Ferris, Democra
candidate for governor of Michig
will speak to the members of
Ferris Institute club at a dil
which they are giving in his honor
6 o'clock tonight in the Union.
Following the dinner the ex-g

ernor will make a political speech
tute was built up to be a school 1
C8 o'clock in the Whitney thea
Through his efforts the Ferris Inj
tute was built up to be a school h
e ing alumni in this state alone c
- sisting of 15,000 members. Ferris
twice been elected governor of M
igan.
n Tickets and information regard
the dinner may be had by calling
n E. Crossley, '22L, at 2619.
- SENIORS TO CAST BALLOT
ly FOR OFFICIALS WEDNESD
Senior lits will cast their I
s votes in the balloting for class
- cers from 2 to 5 o'clock Wednes
- afternoon in University Hall.
, this time votes will be cast for
men who were nominated in the
in liminary balloting.
s Fresh engineers will meet at
t o'clock Wednesday morning in
a versity Hall to complete their n
inations.

there. The course, which i
providing that 24 people eni
shown itself to be popular by
that more than double that

z taught
roll, has
the fact
number

I

"Such is the case when people say,I

I cannot believe in God
don't believe the story the
of Adam and Eve,' or some

because I
Bible tells
similar in-

have entered.
According to Prof. John R. Brumm,
head of the department of journal-
ism, who personally conducts the
classes in Detroit organized under
the University extension division, the
personnel of the classes is made up of
men who are either in newspaper
work in the city and wish to take ad-
vantage of every opportunity to make
themselves better. There are others
enrolled who intend to come to the
University some time in the future
to take up this line of work.
CAR DRIVEN DY DEAN BUTTS
CRASHES INTO SEDAN MONDAY
While making the turn from East
University avenue on to South Uni-
versity avenue late yesterday after-
noon, a touring car, driven by Dean
William Butts, of the engineering
college, skidded, crashed into a se-
dan lined up at the curb, and glanced
off hitting another touring car, com-
ing south on South University ave-
nue, driven by Miss Izora Parkman,
of this city.
All three cars were damaged but
little, the most serious harm being
done to Iean Butts' machine, which
had the front axle and right front
fender smashed.

cident told in connection with our re-
ligion. You can accept or not these
stories as you please, without affect-
ing in any repect your belief in the
fundamental principles of the divinity
or in the Christian religion."
After enforcing briefly the princi-
ples he had given, the President clos-
ed, emphasizing the fact that "If a
man should go through college with-
out establishing his religious relation-
ship definitely and firmly, he has
missed his main purpose in going."

p

mt,... ...,,...s,.., ««....«..,,,, a

ai«nn4-a

11nl

The musical program directeduby play this year excel all previous pro-
William Wheeler, of the School of ductions.
(Continued on page Six) Speaking before 30 junior girls in
Barbour gymnasium yesterday aft
7 T Iernoon, Professor Brumm emphasiz-
14 M k ed the fact that "to start with, an
Mioa idea is the essential thing in writing
a play, while stage effects and spe
cial stunts arrange themselves easily
Galens, honorary upperclass medi- after the fundamental idea is se
cal society, elected the following cured.
members Monday afternoon: honorary "A two act play, with suggestions
members, Drs. Cabot, Parnell, and for business, props, and songs, com
Haag; active members, J. A. Smith, plete in all details, is what is want
H. Taylor, A. Goetz, E. B. McKin- ed," said Professor Brumm. "Manu
ley, L. N. Wieder, J. E. Ludwick, W. scripts should be in by Nov. 1."
E. Cole, M. W. Rychener, Paul He also pointed out that speed in
Moore, W. E. Muldoon, and W. R. writing the play was necessary, a
Torderson. the time is short, but mentioned tha
The initiation and banquet will take often the best plays are written in
place on the evening of Nov. 10. short while.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan