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June 03, 1921 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4*

Univer-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
is exclusively entitled to the use for
spatches credited to it or not herwise
the local news published therein.
ce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
.r mail, $3o.
ress building, Maynard Street.
; Editorial, 2414.
exceed 3o0 words, if signed, the sig
ppear in print, but as an evidence of
will be published in The Daily at the
left at or mailed to The Daily office.
will receive no consideration. No man-
les the writer incluses postage.
necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ens.
tices will not be received after '3 o'clock

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 1414
ITOR ..........GEORGE 0. BROPI*Y JR.
.....I.....................hesser. MCampbell
4i Board ......................ee Woodruff
dame H. W. Hitchcock
'in J. E. McManis
herwood T. W. Srent, Jr.
.............. ........ ... . A. Be t stein
.T. . Whinery,. A. Kern S' .TC each
............ . ..... fcbert Angell
...........................Mary D. Lane
.Tho..a............. E..R.homas Dewey
.. ................e,.... . R. Meies

Assistants
Frank H. McPIke
J. . acon
. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
Byron Darnton
or M. A. Klaver
Walter Donnelly
t Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B.SMahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Waller
H. E. Howlett

P BUSIESS STAFF
Telephone 960
4ESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
Piig............. ..............D P. Joyce
di....'.'......'.......''.................:s. Kunstadter
ates ................................... . R. Prha.
ation''......................... ....... . 9.iler
f~Assistants
k. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
;Hamet, Tr. N. W. Robertson M. . Godring
. Hutchinson 'hos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
. Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
:. L. Davis A. J. Parker
grsona wishing to secure information concerning news for any
di The Daily should se the night editor, who has full charge
news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1921.
Night Editor-HAROLD HOWLETT-
THE MEDICAL SCHOOL
me months ago the campus and the entire
of Michigan were considerably stirred by the
of a break between the University ad-
tration and the State Medical association upon
Zuestioni of extending the University's hospi-
icilities. The doctors claimed as their pre-
or opposing such extension, that it was a step
-d state medicine. Those who advocated
dent Marion L. Burton's point of view main-
I that the doctors feared for their pocket-
, and were opposing him from the very oppo-
f altruistic or public-spirited motives. The dis-
was hot ; but at least it was to be hoped that,
loyalty to the University, no ill-feeling would
rried beyond the meeting, or to such an ex-
Ls to strike at the Medical school itself.
at evidently has not been the case. Charges
ounter-charges continued, frequently fostered
rsons who were not in the least "on the in-
of the question. Among this uninformed
some students are to be numbered. Rumors
eliefs were passed aroun freely as handbills.
P the climax, some students went to the ex-
f passing on the expert information that the
al school was "shot" - ruined in organiza-
nd efficiency - due to the scrape with the
doctors.
s hard to say that such men were deliberately
al. They have certainly been misled; and
fect of their utterances is inevitably calculated
rt Michigan, though not intentionally. Some
ation of the fact that the spreading of such
liable to keep medical students from the Uni-
y should be brought home to them, and a few
facts.of the situation put before them.
at a great, nationally recognized school of
gan's size and record should fall like a stack
as before a conflict of theory on the matter
spital expansion is patently absurd The splen-
istitution built by Dr Vaughan is no such
ing; it can ytand on its own feet, and it has
mmonwealth of Michigan behind it, as shown
e recent appropriation. Dr. Vaughans resig-
ncame as a shock to all Michigan; but it
1 be no tribute to him to claim that the great
. he fostered must of necessity disintegrate
his departure. He built omre than a one-man
ne, and he built for all time. Dr. Cabot, whose
#tment was announced Thursday, comes into
adership of one of the most complete and ef-
medical educational institutions in America.
s time we had an end of rumor and discord
1thinking statements anent the Medical school.
few dean deserves a united Michigan behind
for with the new equipment soon made avail-
he is about to lead the school forth on its
st era of opportunity.
DENATURED DEBATES
..action of the Oratorical board at its last
g in passing a resolution to the effect that it
d the abandonment of the no-decision de-
ntests for next year gives us occasion to con-
gain the merits, or, from the students' stand-
the demerits of the present system.

sider the advantages which are claimed for it by its
supporters as set forth in an article of Professor
Immel's which appeared in The Daily on May 15.
We are perfectly willing to agree with the writer
of the article that childish ideas should no longer
be cherished in college activities. Yet, we are forced
to take issue with the statement that "we still like
to win but we know that it is better to play fair".
Surely, the writer did not mean to imply that in
order to win, there must necessarily be foul play.
If so our social order is in such a condition that
to merely refuse to give a decision in a college de-
bate can in no wise have the slightest influence in
bringing about the period of "maturity" which
seems so desirable to the exponents of no-decision
contests.
Mr.'Immel goes on to say that medical students
study to become good physicians and engineers to
become good engineers. Is it any the less true that
students of the Oratory department study to become
good speakers when they are in the classroom? If
this is not true, then it is the Oratory department
which is failing and not the method of conducting
debates in which only six members of the student
body take part each year.
Perhaps it would not be out of place to call to
mind at this time the article which appeared in The
Daily earlier in the year giving the names of sev-
eral of the graduates of the architectural depart-
ment who had won prizes in a Pan-American con-
test. No doubt the Upiversity should write these
unworthy alumni asking them to refrain from such
childish proceedings as entering the results of their
labors in an internatiohal drawing contest. They
have no right thus to cast reflections on their Alma
Mater.;
And, while we are cleaning up, we feel confi-
dent that our sister university at Urbana would
appreciate our interest if we let them know that the
Scarab medal which is offered there each year looks
childish, and that they will do well in refraining
from offering it. Also, we must not forget to do
away with the Chicago Alumni medal and the hun-
dred dollars award in the yearly oratorical con-
test, since they are signs of immaturity.
Engineering and medical studies are not of the
kind which admit of contests. We cannot believe
that the students in this field are less human than
the rest of us. They simply do not have contests
to engage in.
We also believe that the interest is primarily in
the debate and not in the decision, the same as is
true of all athletic contests. Yet no debater can
be entirely satisfied without seeing the results of
his work.
Why not forget this talk about childishness and
get down to business? The student body and the
majority of this year's debaters want a decision de-
bate. If we expect to get the best results in de-
bating contests, why not begin by satisfying those
. who are most interested?
CONGRATULATIONS, MASQUES
Masques' presentation of "The Importance of Be-
ing Earnest", Wednesday night, marked another ad-
vance in Michigan dramatics. This organization
has worked for some years to raise and maintain a
high standard in its plays, but efforts have hitherto
been confined to the limits of Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
This year their work in Wilde's well-known play,
at the Whitney, was particularly fine. The clever
lines and difficult roles of the play were "put over"
wth almost professional skill, and the stage, with
its three eautiful sets of scenery, retained the same
atmosphere and care for details noted in the for-
mer smaller efforts.
The Telescope

G

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UO TH ENDS

OF THE DIAGONAL WAL K

..1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
( Eastern Standard Tlime)
Limited and Express ears leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a.m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m.. 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9;00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m..12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jachson--7 :w e .; ., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 JUNE 1921
S. I. T. W. T. F. S.
.. 1 2 3 4
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P ANA31A.S
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas, etc., into the Late
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to look just like new. We don t
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Stre,
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GOODHEW FLORAL CO
FLOWERS

125

East Liberty St.

Phone 1321

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1= CITIZENS O
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"The Red
1IIir1tllrrlllrirllrkllllVllllip er"lllll!11llll

S -~

A Confidence
One of two church bells was sold,
'Twas a secret we tried to with-hold;
And we kept it so well,
That the remaining bell,
We are sure was the only one tolled.

r'

Law, Medical
and
Dental Books
Bought, Sold or
Exchanged

" _ ,
t . ' . . _..

The

Turkish C c11r~

Today's cotton telephone is awarded to the indi-
vidual who thinks chili sauce is used for refrigera-
tion purposes.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies poor Louis Thompson; he
Deserves his well-earned rest;
He tried to pass some co-eds who
Were walking four abreast.
"Say, I'm pugilistic."
"Is that so? Are you taking anything for it?"
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"My Girl May Not Love Canines, But She Sure
Puts on the Dog".
Stolen Thunder
He--When you went to see "-lamlet", did you
think he was mad?
She-I guess he was; you see, it was an awfully
poor house. -Orange Peel.
He Won the Wager
Rain or shine he would go to the dinner,
That was the bet;
So it stormed, but, undaunted, he went
To the banquet.
Famous Closing Lines
"Gold Dust," gasped the prospector as he step-

ks & Pastes
Typewriting Paper

Fountalh Pens
Metal Pencils

Biddle's Book Store

11 Nickels Arcade

GOSPEL MEETING

We go 6000 miles for the
Turkish tobacco
used in Murad-Why?
Because--Turkish has a taste -Turkish has a
mildness -Turkish has a delight-far beyond all
cigarette tobaccos of all other lands-
Murad gives you real enjoyment, and true
delight such as no Tobacco other than 100% Pure
Turkish.Tobacct can give.
Facts -'Facts -FACTS-!

In LANE HALL

Friday Evening at 7:45

/

Tens of thousands of smokers
--tens of thousands of times-
have PROVEN this-
"Judge for Yourself-!"

Subject Psalm 51.7
"Purge me with hyssop, and I
shall be clean: wash me, and
I shall be whiter than snow."

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