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June 03, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-03

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LLR
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ASSOC IATI
PRESS
SEUVICE

No. 173.

ANN. ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1921.

PRICE

HARDING'S
BEFORE 250
IL GRADUATES:

Seniors Award High Honors To
Classmates In flock Elections

Tokens of high regard for excellence
in some of the less orthodox of stu-

dent activities were rendered

to a

CALLS WILLINGNESS TO FIGHT
ONE OfJ SAFEGUARDS OF
NATION
SAYS AMERICA MUST
HAVE HIGHEST IDEALS
Secretary Denby Advises Them to Be
}Offieers and Gentlemen" andd
Never Snobs
(By Associated Press)
Annapolis, Md., June 2. - Presi-
dent Harding presented diplomas to
the naval academy graduating class
here today with a prayer that the
newly commissioned officers never
would be called into battle, but with
an admonition that willingness to fight
and to die for one's country always
must remain one of the most potent
safeguards to civilization.
Speaking at Dahlgren hall before
the midshipmen and thousands of
their relatives and friends assembled
for the graduation exercises, the
President solemnly reaffirmed his
faith in a strong and zealous repub-
lic, but added that he wanted it al-
ways a republic of the most high
ideals. "The most desired of national
attainments," he said, "would be a
medium between the spirit maintained
in our institutions and the spirit of
the crusaders."
Previously Secretary Denby, of the
navy department, had made the for-
mal address for commencement advis-
ing the graduates that their best as-
set as officers would be the respect
and love of their men, and counsel-
ing them to be truly "officers and
gentlemen" and never snobs.
V11F1 W. HOLDS INITIATION,
ANIERSAR1 BNQUT
More than 75 members of the Rich-1
ard N. Hall post, of the Veterans of+
Foreign Wars, attended the banquet
held at the Armory last evening given
by the post in commemoration of its
first anniversary and also as a fare-
well to the members who will graduate
this Spring.<
Following the banquet, N. K. Cham-
berlain, '22E, the toastmaster of the
evening, introduced B. F. Field, '21,
who gave a short talk on behalf of the
senior membe's. Warren V. Gilbert,
'22E, former president of the post, then1
read a brief history of the Richard
N. Hall post.
G. A. Schuster, '21, introduced the
speaker of the evening, Prof. WilliamI
H. Hobbs, of the geology department,E
who spoke to the men concerning the
work that the University did during
the World War.' Professor Hobbs also
complimented the members of the post
on the influence they had been able
to exert on campus questions.
At the conclusion of this speech s x
new members were initiated into the
order with impressive Inilitary cere-
."nony.
'21 LITS HAVE LAST CHANCE '
TO PAY DUES IN BOOTH TODAY
Absolutely the last opportunity for
members of the senior literary class toA
pay class dues at the booth in Uni-i
versity hall will be given from 2 to 4
o'clock today. There will be no moret
collections made on the campus after
today, and dues by mail will be receiv-
ed only up until Saturday, June 4.
Part of the class has paid dues, butl
there are many members who will note
be eligible for the many class func-
tions the last of the month, becauseI

they have not yet paid dues.

chosen few of the members of the sen-
ior literary class at a meeting yester-
day afternoon.
Class Secretaries Picked
Before proceeding to its mock elec-
tions, the class elected secretaries to
represent the men and women of the
graduating class after leaving the Uni-
versity. Fred J. Petty, president of
the senior class, was chosen yesterday
for the men and Marguerite A. Clark,
president of the Women's league, was
elected to represent the women.
In the mock elections Aletha Yerkes
and Fred J. Petty were chosen, despite
the great competition offered, as the.
the most popular girl and man. The
CAMPUS MEN BACK'
Plan Aims to Give Real Vacation to
Neglected Street Boys of
Detroit, Vicinity

prettiest girl proved to be Alice Beck-
ham. Addison , P. Cook was chosen
with acclaim to be the h.ndsomest
man, an honor that was felt to be not
unmerited by those present, even for
such a large class as that c 1921'.
Albert C. Jacobs and Mildred sherman!
were voted to be, the best man and
women students, respectively, the com-
petition for these positions being quite
mild. Ernest Armstrong was then
selected as the biggest grind by a large
majority. His co-partner, the biggest
woman grind, was decided to be Kat-
rina Schermerhorn.
McManis Named as Bluffer
John McManis was picked as the
most successful bluffer: Stewart Bax-
ter was named as the smoothest poli-
tician, and Jean Wallace as the jolliest
girl. The selection of class vampire
finally brought Grace Ohlmacher in as
winner, although Frances Oberholtzer
ran a magnificient race.
No difficulty was felt in selecting
the biggest fusser, George Duffield re-
ceiving the honor by unanimous vote.
The most bashful man and woman
were fittingly named to be Mary D..
Lane and Robert C. Angell. Elton E.
Wieman was named as the best ath-
lete. In conclusion the class recom-
pensed Frances Oberholtzer for her
previous disappointment by naming
here the best kidder.
Invitations Expected Thursday
Senior invitations are expected here'
by next Thursday, according to Fred
J. Petty, president of the class, ano
will be given out that afternoon from
2 to 4 o'clock in University hall. Ban-
quet tickets may be procured at the
same time. Class dues must be paid
today by all seniors who expect to at-
tend the class banquet and Commence-
ment exercises. Dues will be received
in the booth in the corridor of Uni-
versity hall from 2 to 4 o'clock this
afternoon.
The final meeting of the class will be
held Thursday afternoon, June 9, inC
Natural Science auditorium and will
be addressed by Dean John R. Effing-
er. The class will then have a group
picture taken on toe steps of the Li-
brary in caps and gowns. Seniors are

ALUIMNI INTEREST SELVES
IN $,000 EQUIPMENT, SITEI
A movement to establish a "Michi-
gan Fresh Air Camp" this summerG
was ilaced under way yesterday when
a committee of 26 students organiz-
ed to co-operate wtih Detroit and
state alumni to found a University
camp for negletced street boys of De-
troit and other cities. The organiza-
tion was effected through Student
Christian association channels.
$1,500 Hoped For
Prominent alumni are interested in
securing $5,000 for the site and equip-
tuent for the camp which is expect-
ed to become a permanent institution
like the successful Princeton and
Pennsylvania camps. Students will be
asked to raise $1,500 to pay the living
expenses of 150 boys who will be
brought to the camp in relays of 50,
each group to take a two weeks' va-
cation from the city heat, and to have
their moral characters shaped by Uni-
versity men to whom they look as
heroes.
"Duke" Dunne, '22, was elected
chairman of the local committee,
which decided to present the matter
to the campus on Monday, Tuesday,'
and Wednesday of next week. Hugh
W. Hitchcock, '22, was named to see
that the matter was put before the
fraternities, and Edward R. Gold-
man, '22E, for the independent men.
All Asked to Help
A chairman for women has not yet
been appointed. The faculty will al-
so be given- an opportunity to help in
the work, Douglas Dow, '22E, being
placed at the head of the committee.
to see them.
(Continued on page five)
Audience Likes
Thrd Senior Sing,
Although only a small group of sen-
i'ors turned out for the third senior
sing, the music pleased the audience1
of more than 300 which was present.
Several songs which have not been
sung here for some time were on the
impromptu program. Among them
were "The Friars' Song", "All You-
German Mothers", and "Ragtime Cow-
boy Joe". :The second proved espe-;
cially popular. "Ann Arbor Days", a
song from the 1920 opera, "George
Did It", which bids fair to last, was
also well received.
The last Ofghe Senior sings will be;
held at the same time and place next
Thursday. .

UNION OF FICIALS
ME CHANESI
ADVISORY BODY
FRESHMEN WILL VISIT THEIR
ADVISERS NEXT YEAR
WHEN CALLED
NEED 400 VOLUN'EER
GUIDES FOR '25 MEN
Plan to Complete Organization This
Month; Committee Ready to
. Act in Fall
Re-organization of the Upperclass
Adisory committee, by the elimina-
tion of features which made the sys-
tem work only 40 per cent efficient
this year, was outlined yesterday by
Union officials.
Freshmen will visit their upper-
class advisers upon being called by
telephone instead of the upperclass-
men calling on the freshmen as was
the practice this year. The plan did
'not work as smoothly as it might have
because upperclassmen failed to get
in touch with those first year men
who were not at hoe when visits
were made.
Need 400 Advisers
Volunteers will be sought imme-
diately to act as advisers, 400 being
needed. The system, which was or-
ganized on very short- notice this
year, was handicapped in that men
who were burdened with a great
amount of other work, found them-
selves having to do advisory work
also. The plan for next year is that
men who are serious, who have the
time, and who desire to be of service
to Michigan, volunteer to serve. Men
who are busy with other work, but
who wish to put time on the advisory
work, will also be accepted.
Each adviser is to be in charge of
several freshmen. He will make
monthly reports to a sub-chairman
over him, and periodic meetings will
be held. The sub-chairman will num-
ber 40 men, and will be responsible
to the Upperclass Advisory committee
of the Union.
State Purpose of Committee
The purpose of the committee is to
help the freshman acquire a proper
understanding and appreciation of his
University; to teach him Michigan
ideals and traditions; to interest him
in activities; to develop loyalty to his'
class and tniversity; to assist him
with his college work; and to create
a spirit of unity among all.
That much good was accomplished
for the freshmen considering the fact
that this was the first year of the
plan's operation, is felt by officials
who see in the plan unlimited oppor-
tunities for building Michigan spirit
by working with the freshman class.
With an organization completed
this month, and ready to function at
the opening of college in the fall, it
(Continued on Page Eight)
MIMES TAKES 9;
ELECTS OFFICERS
Holding their first meeting under
the new constitution and organiza-
tion, Mimes of the Michigan Union
elected Thomas . Underwood, '23L,
president for next year, Albert Schir-
mer, '22E, vice-president, and Buck-
ley C. Robbins, '23,. secretary and
treasurer.
In accordance with the provisions

of the new constitution only nine new.
men were taken into the society, the
initiation , being held last night and
consisting of special stunts by each
of the initiates. The men taken in
were Richard Forsyth, '22L, W. L.
Kemp, '22M, Gordon Loud, '22, Frank.
McPhail, '21, William Michaels, '22,
Stephen Perry, '22L, Earl Powers, '22,
Philip Ringer, '22, and Buckley C.
Robbins, '23.°

Scribes Prepare
For Hard Tussle
Hostilities between The Daily and
gargoyle editorial staffs will come, to
a focus when teams representing the
two publications meet at 10 o'clock.
Saturday morning on Ferry field.
Jack Kelly, who is leading the gar-
goyle warriors into action, is deter-
mined that the honor of the "Fun-
makers" shall be upheld and has se-
lected a strong team to support him.
Howard Weeks, who has acquired a
reputation as a twirler, will occupy
the mound and Clayton Seagers will
face him.
However, Bus Campbell, captain of
The Daily forces, is equally certain
of victory and feels that his team will
have no difficulty in overcoming the
gargoyle nine.

BACON MANUSCRIPTI
SECRETS RlEVEALEDI

I

therefore urged to wear their
apparel at this time.

i

class

SIgAXI1HAS ANNUAL-
BANQUET; ,INIT19IATS 58
PROF. J. C. PARKER, RETIRING
PRESIDENT, DELIVERS
ADDRESS
Sigma Xi, national honorary scien-
tific fraternity for excellence in schol-
arship, initiated 56 persons in connec-
tion with~its annual meeting and ban-
quet last night at the Union.
Prof. John C. Parker, of the electric-
al engineering department, retiring
president of the Michigan chapter, ad-
dressed the society upon, "Research-
An Outside View." The speaker laid
stress on the relations esential to the
adjustment, of research to an actual
world. "Research cannot live of itself
any more than it can live to itself,"
stated Professor Parker. "To an out-
sider it seems that the most nearly es-
sential factor in big research is co-
operation. In this lies ample oppor-
tunity for usefulness for our research
societies."
Officers elected for the coming two
years were: President, Prof. A. Frank-
lin Shull, of the zoology department;
vice-president, Prof. Warren F. Lom-
bard, of the physiology department;
secretary, Prof. Peter O. Okkelberg, of
the zoology department; treasurer,
Prof. Carl V. Weller, of the pathology
department. Councillors selected were:
Prof. E. C. Case, of the geology depart-
ment; Prof. B. F. Bailey, of the engi-
neering department; and Prof. E. H.
Kraus, of the mineralogy department.'

N'ewbold Explains Importance of Dis-
eoveries Which Change History
of Scientific Research
MICROSCOPE AND TELESCOPE,
USED BY MEDIEVAL SCIENTIST
Some of the most scholarly 'efforts
that the Michigan campus is apt to
see for some time to come were dis-
played by Prof. William Romaine
Newbold, of the philosophy depart-
ment of the University of Pennsyl-
vania, when he gave an illustrated
lecture on the Voynich "Roger Ba-
con Manuscript" in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium yesterday afternoon.
Gives Historical Sketch
The professor began his talk with
a brief historical summary of the
hands through which the manuscript
had passed up to the time that it came
into the possession of Mr. Wilfred
Voynich of London in 1912. He told
how John Dee, confidential agent of
Queen Elizabeth, probably carried the
manuscript to Emperor Rudolph of
Russia about 1580 and how it was
moved from place to place until fin-
ally purchased by Mr. Voynidh.
The conclusions drawn that Roger
Bacon used a high powered micro-
scope and a telescope in his day were
interesting in themselves. The addi-
tional fact that Bacon was compelled
to keep his discoveries a secret be-.
cause of the attitude of the govern-
nment and the people of that time to-
ward new ideas helps us to under-
stand why the secrets held in the
manuscript were so closely guarded
by Bacon, according to Professor New-
bold.
Many times throughout his writ-
ings Bacon makes mention of new
things he has discovered and hopes
to discover in the future. Bringing
this latest work to light is claimed
to aid in interpreting many passages!
in Bacon which have had no particu-
lar meaning to us. in the past.
Triple Cipher Scheme
The manuscript was written in a
triple cipher scheme. Professor New-
bold has not translated all the writ-
ings as the common conception seems
to be, but has merely drawn conclu-
sions from the drawings contained in
the work together with a small
amount of deciphering which he has
been able to do.
The opinon expressed by a large
number of those who attended the- lec-
ture was that one of the most inter-
esting features consisted in the ex-
planations of how the professor ar-
rived at his conclusions. They show-
ed the inner workings of the mind
of a shrewd, accurate, and profound
thinker.

CABOT APPOINTEE
ANEW DEANO1.
MEDICL SCH
FORMER PROFESSOR OF SUR(
NAMED AS SUCCESSOR TO
VAUGHAN
ABILITY AS SURGEON,
TEACHER, LED TO C
Poisessor of Distinguished 0
'Awarded for Servces in
B. E. F.
Dr. Hugh Cabot. University pr
sor of surgery and for two years
of the department of surgery i
University hospital, was yest4
appointed dean of the University
ical school to succeed Dr. Vict
Vaughan, whose resignation wa
cently accepted after more tha
years of service as head of the s
The appointment, which become
fective July 1, was announced
the office of President Marion L.
ton.
Ability Recognized
Coming to Michigan two years
after his discharge from ove
service with the British Expedi
ary forces, Dr. Cabot was give
rank of professor on the staff o
medical faculty. His reputation
teacher and'surgeon in the Eas
to his call to Ann Arbor, and
Vaughan, the retiring dean,- wa
,strumental in securing his ser
for the University.
Dr. Cabot was born at Be
Farms, Mass., Aug. 11, 1872, -th
of James Elliott and Elz
Dwight Cabot. He studied at the
bury Latin school and entered
yard in 1890, receiving the A.B
gree in 1894. Four years late
was graduated from the Ha
Medical school with the degree
Doctor of Medicine.
Surgeon In Boston
Following his graduation fron
medical school, Dr. Cabot was
two years house surgeon at the '
achusetts general hospital in Bc
Then he entered bractice in B
with his cousin, the late Arth
Cabot, and soon afterwards was
,pointed instructor in operative
gery in the Harvard Medical sc
and from 1902 was on the staff o
Massachusetts general hospital i
department of surgery.
In 1910 Dr. Cabot was place
charge of the newly created de
ment of the hospital, dealing
genito-urinary surgery, continubi
charge of this department until
(ContInued on Page Eight)
BEVERIDGE SPEAKS
TO GUILD SUND
Ex-Senator Albert J. Beveridge
deliver an address on the su
"The Bible as' Good Reading" at
o'clock Sunday night at the
Arbor Methodist church under th
spices of the Wesleyan guild.
Senator Beveridge comes to An:
bor from Flint, where he will's
before the State Bar associatio
Saturday afternoon. While, in
city he will be the guest of Pr
C. Trueblood, of the oratory 'de
ment.
Professor Trueblood has arr
to have Senator Beveridge ad
members of the Oratorical associ

on Monday afternoon and at this
the senator will speak on some 1
of public speaking.
The lecture on the bible whici
will give Sunday night is an old
orite and one which has been
received wherever it has been
throughout the country. Both o
lectures will be open to the p
and especially students of the Ur
sity.

1.,

Must be out of the
Library before

THE

MICHIGANENSIAN

GET YOUR COF
East'Basement Drive
of the Library

)day

r.

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