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May 29, 1921 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

I~I I

AFTER

By VAN EVERY

med from Page One)
rge the book with no defi-'
Indeed, before the central
Christian Wahnschaffe, is
there are a number of
aling with a delightful old
lamed Crammon, an aristo-
fingertips, a lovable cynic,
the mob, a connoiseur of
wine, and. food. I admire
Wahnschaffe is somewhat

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er, but the latter decides to give Pe
another chance. Peter rewards
trust by saving him from the clute
of the naughty warden.
Norman Kerry and Zena Keefe p
the leads, supported by Jack Cros
Paul Everton, and William Tool
The picture, thaugh a crook story, c
tains a comic twist which makes i
trifle different from others of the sa
type. All in all it should prove a]p
ture well worth seeing.
To vary the last part of the wee
program at the Arcade, Sydney Ch
lin has been booked in "King, Que
Joker." This is a laugh from beg
ning to end centering around the
semblance between the king of Coro
and a barber's assistant. Sydney
pers aroand in this picture quite
successfully as his more illustri
namesake. For those who wish to
a clean comedy, void from most of
usua) slapstick, "King, Queen, Joke
is heartily recommended.

i

ent; he is still more aloof, and
his friends feel a barrier. Yet
mon becomes his friend, as close
end, perhaps, as Christian ever

Impossible Character
Then there is Eva Sorel, a dancer.
To me she is an impossible figure. I
simply cannot conceive of a woman so
gifted and beautiful that half the cul-
tured men of Europe follow her around
on their knees, imperilling estates and
empires. Cleopatra? Madame Pompa-
dour? Eva Sorel is not their kind; she
is no intriguer; she is serious, re-
served, a tireless worker, reader and
observer. Men seek her as something
infinitely desirable. Even cynical old
Crammon wets an eye as he thinks of
his years.
Lacks "Cortesia"
Like two eagles with the world be-
low, Christian and Eve become lovers.
Then Eva, tireless spirit, tires of
Christian, because, as the author some-
what bunglingly explains, Christian
lacks "cortesia." And yet I see Eva"
as a person far more euphuistic than
Christian. For all her perspective she
lacks the delicacy of Christian and the
high-spun philosophy of Crammon.
Christian next throws his lot among
the rabble. A sad step, surely; I can-
not sympathize with it. But Wasser-
mann displays no prejudice; he makes
no heaven out of a pig-pen. Christian
renounces even as Tolstoi, but not
from the same maudlin motive. Chris-
tian, at heart, is tired of his arista-
cratic environment. He wants to
change, even as the man of the gutter
wants to change from his cordid, im-
placable 4onotony.,
On the other hand we observe an
Amadeus 'Voss, a son of a forester,
who is elevated in position through'
the tolerance of Christian. Amadeus
is a typical Puritan, a loutish fellow,
quoting the Scriptures right and left,
yet volutuous and vulgar almost be-
yond measure. Money and association
with better persons improve him a
little, but he always remains some-
thing of a poltroon.
Postlogue Like Hauptmann
Finally Christian breaks completely
with his family. tossing a tremendous
fortune- behind him, and fading entire-]
ly from view. And here the book ends,
excepting for a fairy-tale postlogue
that reminds me of Hauptmann. So
much so, that it occurred to me to try
-at the library for Hauptmann's "Fool
in fhrist;" so that I might make a com-
parsion with its central figure and the
character of Christian Wahnschaffe.
But a faculty member had the book,
and of course, for an indefinite period.
It is on occasions like this that I al-
most turn socialist. But then, he may
tell his class about it! He may even
praise it!
Awhile back I likened Wassermann
to Dreiser. I liken him now to Sher-
wood Anderson. The reaction of Was-
sermann's abnorial characters to
love, greed, and anger is very often
violent, with dancings up and down,
and pumpings of the arms :and legs.
Practically all of Sherwood Anderson's
characters react thus. I wonder some-
times if the latter does not overdo the
thing.
Comparable to Ibsen
Now let the erudite snicker. I also
compare Wassermann to Ibsen, not
only in broad survey'but in actualities.
Indeed, .in "The World's Illusions" we
find a Doctor Voltolini who has suffer-
ed an experience almost identical with
that of Doctor Stockman in the "En-
emy of-the People."
The book is overwhelming. I have
tried hard to present it, only to find
that I have been unable to summarize
the mass of details which make the
thing great: the sufferings, the long-
ings, the lusts, the emotions, the shad-
rows of defeat, among the rich and poor
alike. Wassermann has his reins on
far too many characters, and on far

too many experiences for me to switch
seats and drive.
. Read the book. Read it two, or three
or a half dozen' times. I predict that
someday someone will write very vol-
uminously about Jacob Wassermann,!
and that no small portion of the work
will be give over to "The World's Il-
lusions."
Use Classified advertising and sell
your miscellaneous articles.-Adv.

Seen Oan The
Stag e -- Screen
(By F. M. K.)
"What Every Woman Knows", with
a supporting cast including such stars
as Conrad Nagel, Lois Wilson, Charles
Ogle, and Guy Oliver, promises to fur-
nish interesting entertainment at the1
Majestic beginning today. The story
is that of a railway porter with politi-
cal aspirations who steals into the
house of Alick Wylie, an old Scatch-
man, to take advantage of that gentle-
man's library. Wylie discovers him,
and consents to let the young man use
his books provided that he promises
to marry his daughter, Maggie, five
years hence.
At the end of that time the porter
has profited so well that he is elected
to the House of Commons, and in ful-
fillment of the agreement proclaims
iMaggie his wife. The successful portery1
is not as wise as he believes, however,
for in typewriting his speeches for
him, his devoted wife often is forced
to make secret corrections in gram-
mar. Meanwhile the new member of
parliament becomes infatuated with a
lady of the nobility, and he attempts
to use her as the inspiration for his
greatest speech.
He gives the speech to an old states-
man who tells him that it lacks the'
character of his other ones. Maggie
prepares a second version and the
statesman is delighted. Then follows
a reconciliation during which the,
young man realizes-the importance of
Maggie to his future success. The play
offers a strong exposition of human
character and interest, and has an
added value of containing a setting
and plot unusual to the screen.
.- * * *
"TheFaith Healer" opens a four day
run at the Arcade today. This story
is a weak version of "The Miracle
Man" Milton Sills, playing the part of
Michaelis, a shepherd, who hears the
divine calling, heals with a success
I-

that dispels all doubt. The play, how-
ever, contains many tense moments,
and supported by an excellent cast,
should prov4 a pleasant entertainment.
* * *
On Wednesday, "The Great Day"
opens at the Majestic for a two day
stay. This offers a relief from "What
Every Woman Knows", being inclined

towards the melodramatic. The play
includes an escape from a German
prison, an attempted blackmail, and a
battle with a gang of thugs. The pic-
ture is an, adaptation of the Drury
Lane melodrama of -the same name,
and is supported by a notable cast in-
cluding Arthur Bourchier Marjorie
Hume, and Percy Standing.

"Proxies" closes the week at the Ma-
jestic on Friday and Saturday. It is
written by Frank R."Adams, a Michi-
gan graduate, who uses the somewhat
hackneyed plot of a former convict
trying to go straight. Peter, the gen-
tleman in question, is acting as a
butler in a fashionable home when he
is recognized there by his former war-

Advance In Pricesi '''
SUDAY 20c - SHOWS 2;00, 3:30, 7:00,. 8:30

I

. f/-

t\ .

t1 I
! t
M
w
. _.

STARTING TODAY -
>he romance of a woman more fas-
cinating than Cleopatra and a man
whose love for her transcends death
itself.
The intimate story of the Little 11111
liner whom the world camne to know
as Madame DuBarry.
Axl & 3

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Aolo

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r
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STARTING

TODAY

['S

CONSTANCE BINNEY
IN
THE MAGIC CUP"

HARO

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NEY
/1 lauqh tere al
Come and bring your wife and child
.Harold Lloyd is running wild!

AS LONG AS THE TRACKS AND WITH A
CHUCKLE AT EVERY TIE.
AS FAST AS A SPEEDY EXPRESS TRAIN.
AS SWEET AS A KISS IN A TUNNEL.

THE MAGIC CUP i
Just a tarnished, battered old silver cup-
but it prove d to be the magic link which
would restore to a wistful-eyed little scullery
maid the wonderful heritage which belonged
to her.

Laughter
£Action
!Romance

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