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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 29, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,;

MANY INENTORS AMONG
SECTION IUMICHIGAN GRADUATEU i

ATURE

hed every Sunday as a supplement to
uar news section of The Michigan
butions must be in the hands of the
y Wednesday previous to the date of
publication.
immunications or contributions must
d as an indication of good faith.
r Editor.... Joseph A. Bernstein
Assistants
n 1. Dakin Thomas H. Adams
W. Ottaway Byron Darmn
Editor..........Stewart T. Beach
...........,Edwin R. Miess
-(By E. H..) --
BLOOD AND THUNDER
ou ever yearned adventure
ost alarming way?
ou found the skies above you
Lctive, drab and gray?
u've started out to seek -
id of actions and of joys,
eading up Nick Carter
e roving Rover Boys.
ve hurled an Indian dustward,
side of Diamond Dick, -
u've shot a man at poker
ae tried to pull a trick;,
ve raced with Barney Qldfield
ve given him your dust,
u've saved the weak and help.:
ur murders all were just.
coralled a gang of bandits,
u've sent them all to jail,
u've held a house in place.
a mile a minute gale;
gamer still than Brody,
.1 take a bigger chance,
ve floored the wild west hero
e asked you for a dance.

(Continued from Page One)
known .s the Tanner Engineering
company. He attained distinction in
development of the gyroscope com-
pass and stablizer for ships and air-
planes.
He hakes Gears
Two prominent alumni with the
Western Electric company, J. W. Har-
ris and F. W. Willard, have made a
great deal of progress in the develop-
ment of enamel insulation for induc-
tive circuits. Alumnus, W. Y. Stroh,
patented a process for casting hard
steel gears for heavy machinery and
prior to the war was shipping a large
number of them to the German Gov-
ernment.
Floyd Nagler, who obtained his doc-
tor's degree from the engineering col-
lege in '17, the first man to obtain such
a degree until that time, has written'
some excellent articles dealing with
research in the hydraulic engineering┬░
field. In 1918,he won the Collingwood
prize offered by the American society1
of Civil Engineers with an article en-'
titled "Obstruction of Bridge Piers to
the Flow of Water" and the following
year won the same prize with a paper
on "verification of the Bazin Weir
Formula by Hydro-Chemical Gaug-
ings." Both of these articles brought
the author wide fame throughout thej
country.
In 1916 Forest Nagler, '06, perfected

a new type of water wheel especially
adapted to low head adjustments. The
Nagler wheel as the invention is
known, is of the propeller type similar
to the propeller of a ship and is re-
signed for high ratative speed with
large volumes of water. Mr. Nagler
has been associated with the Allis-
Chalmers company since leaving the
University.
Sherzer Develops Pump
Prof, Allen F. Sherzer, of the me-
chanical engineering department, who
graduated from the University in '13,
has developed a three inch centrifugal
pump which is capable of covering the
field where formerly a two inch, a
three inch, a four inch, and a five inch
pump were employed. William Mel-
ville and A. M. Fairlie, alumni, -made
extensive improvements in the meth-
ods of manufacturing sulphuric acid.
Without doubt there have been-many
more inventions credited to graduates
of the University and the list given;
above can in no way be considered a
comprehensive one. So many minor.
details have been developed and im-1
provements made in theories and de-
signs of recent years that exact infor-
mation would hardly be available even
though the records of the patentoffice
were closely scrutinized. Michigan
olumuni have been accomplishing
their share of this work however and
credit is due them for their achieve-r
ments.
Have you lost anything .that you'
prize very highly? The Classified
columns of The Michigan Daily are
always ready to serve vou.-Adv.. t

ALAS POOR CHRISTOPHER
WE DIDN'TKNOW HIM~
(Continued from Page One)
tal service can show profit as well ,as
loss if it wants to, and that dandelions-
look better inside one's house than on
one's lawn.
But the biggest thing by far that the
hurry-up boy has shown in his tryout
in the Twentieth Century league is
that Columbus, the man who gave Wall
street its idea and reason for existence.
when he took the country away from
the Indians for a few neck-lengths of
beads and Woolworth jewelry, was a
contortionist, magician, hypnotist, and
general utility entertainer.
You ask, "How come?" Well, as
they say in the bicycle corps, pedal
down to University hall and come to
attention opposite the registration of-
fice. Then feast your eyes on a gen-
uine replica of a famous piece of sculp-
ture of the beginning, middle and end
of why and how Columbus discov-
ered us.
. It is a marvelous piece of art. The
best way to judge art is by the Venus
de Milo statue, with the arms broken
off and the face wearing a smile as
if the owner is suing the railroad for
a millionaire's income tax on a charge
of separation. So, on this assumption,
I say that the Columbus series is art.
In one corner, upper left, we see
Christopher imploring Queen Isabella
and her spouse Ferdinand to sign a
royal requisition for one fleet to cross

the Atlantic. He is on' bended knee,
beseeching the crowned heads with
outstretched-hand. Just one hand-.
the other hand probably is hiding in
a pocket, or on the study desk at home.
Isabella, in an adjacent section, is
conversing with her throne mate con-
cerning the advisability of secoiding

Christopher's motion, whilee latter
wears a hopeful candidate rile and
stands on one-foot. He hahis two
hands, but must have forgen his
other fot when he put his al on.
In the fifth reel, the headof the
department sign on the dott line,
(Continued on Page Fou

A PORTABLE VICTROLA

FOR YOUR CANOE

A victrola for $25.00 that

will last for years.
about getting one.

See us

,

Schaeberle & Son, Music House

110 S. Main St.

The Essence of Goodness
In Ice Cream Lies In
The Flabor
ICE C RLEAM
Certainly has got the flabor

-14

-*M-nJrnI

i

III

have- proved your mighty power,
the whole world understands
you've bent a bar of iron
a twig between your hands;
h.ve grappled with a lion,
ing weapons for defense,.
have rescued men from horrors,
you've asked no recompense.
have founght a thousand fires,
re survived a thousand fates,
have made the country know
you're the only one who rates;
you wonder why you're proud
ving drunk a quart of cream,
with awful disappointment
awaken from a dream.
4INUTIVE SHIPS
RACE WITH TIME
(Continued from Page One)
hem. During the past few years
especially during the yar period,
epartment has aided the govern-
in many ways, By a series of
riments it retermined the most
>mical shape for the merchant
ie vessels which the government'
building at that time. Morever,
the Mississippi river commis-
rs, consisting of U. S. Army en-
rs, were searching for the best
of barges and tow-boats for river
portation, Michigan's naval en-
ring deparfment solved their
em for them. This is a means of
portation which is becoming more
more important in the United'
s. If transportation by rail con-
s to be so high, a cheaper way,
eans of water Will be used more
sively. If a more economic ve,
or transportation can be bul1t
todities will become cheaper; and
aval engineering department has
:y done a great deal on a type
rer vessel which can travel more
mical.
the present time the department
gaged in "a series of experiments
;ermine the best shape of sections
ds of vessels for different types
peeds.
Ask for the
The Smart Looking, Popular Shoe
for CAMPUS
adCLASS ROOM
Ideal, All Round College Shoe'
Same High Quality as the
OM LOGAN GOLF SHOE
"f yor eaercano-sp- ~

THiE AJVfUSE T.ENT CENT1LRSOFANN ARB3OR

- - I I ! I - --

TODAY - MONDAY -TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY

. .. . ,

GARRIC.

Mats. Tuesday, Thursday,
& Saturday 25o-50o
Nights 0c-75o-$1.00

12th Annual Season
3rd. Week
The Bonstelle Co."

presents

His faith that had he
gone! For love of a w
And the jeering crowd
But she whom he had
in the end saved him.

"Sab"

.

BROKEN!"
aled the sick, was
voman!
s stoned him.
saved from shame,Js'LLk
Jesse L, Lasky
prSQts
PA4ODUCTION
I~tV V

THIS W EEK

"CLARENCE "

SHUBER T N 0 W
IDE TR OI NIGHTS at 8:15

The Coolest spot in town-Temperature 70
D. W. GRIFFITH'S

"A photo-
graphic tri-
umph that
brought de-
served cheers."
-Detroit Free
Press.

WAY

"Spectators
find themselves

DOWN
EAST

gripping
arms of

the
their

chairs." - De-
troit News.

IVI
.r. 1
1
By William Yaaglin Moody-Photoplay by Mrs. Wm. Tauglin Moody and Z. Wall Covington

:.-

PRICES-Nights and Saturday Matinees, 50c to $2.00.

All Other Matinees, 25c to $1.00.
Matinee Every Day at 2:15 at Popular Prices.
Special Limited Engagement
Sunday Matinees at Popular Prices

THE CAST-MILTON SILLS | OUT OF THE DARKNESS
AND ANN FORREST I HE ASKED FOR LIGHT
AND AS A DIVERSION OF THOUGHT THE TOONERVILLE FOLLIES
WILL TICKLE EVERY MUSCLE-The SKIPPER is FUNNIER than EVER

REGULAR PRICES KINOGRAMS
SHOWING TODAY - 1:30,3:00,

ARCADE ORCHESTRA
4:30, 7:00 and 8:30

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