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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 29, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'al Department Is

'usy !taking 'EmExercise

(By C. B. T.)
any are the branches of student
vity housed by the Ann Arbor
ss building. There are the offices
he student publications-the Daily,
Chimes, the Gargoyle, the 'Ensian,
their ilk, and there, too, is the
ctum of the Athletic Association'
n behind whose doors the steps of1
higan athletic teams are guided.+
room 3, however, there is still an-.
er activity of which much is heard
little known, namely, the Depart-
it of Intramural Athletics.
herein, under the leadership of1
er D. Mitchell, '12, a former Michi-
captain and coach, is one of the
t highly specialized of collegiate
vities, an office where all play isl
k-hard, tiresome, and intricate.
m the first days of school'in Octo-
until the beginning of the exam-
,ion period in June the staff of the
am'ural office is going at full force1
i never a let-up.
ittle of the glory of the other de-
ments of athletics ever descendsl
,n the workers in the Intramuralt

field. The student manager in charge
heads the activities the year around,
sits in the Board of Directors of Ath-
letics, and receives an "M", but his is
the most difficult of all managerial
positions, the one calling for the most
of time and energy. He receives not
even the satisfaction of an occasional
trip with an athletic team such as is
given the managers of sports, whose
work, while of the greatest difficulty
while it lasts continues over but a
season.

intramural class and fraternity cal-
endar with the additions of basketball,
baseball, bowling, and track, as well
as such minor tournaments as that of
foul shooting, which takes place be-
fore the basket ball games of the win-
ter time.
The task of handling these leagues
"within the walls" of the university, as
well as the charge of the four informal
Varsity teams, is no mean one, for it
requires the utmost in perservance,
and, above all, diplomacy. Seemingly
invincible obstacles must be overcome
before a year may be brought to a suc-
cuessful conclusion. Time after time
a squabble will arise over some minor
point, and it is the duty of the depart-
ment to use ever available bit of tact
in settlement, something that cannot
always be done to the complete satis-
faction of all concerned.
At only two universities in America,
other than Michigan, has organization
o fthe Department of Intramural Ath-
letics reached a degree of perfection
comparable with that of the Ann Arbor

institution. Pennsylvania and Ohio
State have wonderfully organized de-i
partments, and their work is of the
finest. Ohio State in particular has a
wide field to work in, for they handle
not only the athletics of men on the1
campus, but of women. A great intra-
mural carnival is held there each year,t
this spring some 1600 men and women1
were entered in different athletic
events. The co-eds -appear in suchc
features as intersorority relays; and
in mixed races with sororities and fra-
ternities pairing off. Independent
women, too, take part in the competi-
tion.
"ALAS POOR CHRISTOPHER!"
WE DIDN'T RECOGNIZE HIM
(Continued from Page Two)
and in the next scene we find Colum-
bus saying, "Sail on, sail on," to his
sailors, who are begging him to turn
back. The leader of the -mutineers has
his full stre~igth except for a head,

which must have been reposing in the
first mate's cabin, and is presenting a
petition to Columbus.
Here Columbus is depicted in a
close-up, with arms, legs, heads and
hands, but only four toes on one foot
and three on the other. Again. when
the fleet gets into dry-dock in West
Indies shipyards, the Indians, some
with one ears, others with one nose,1
one arm and one leg, crowd about the'

Allied sailors, who, with Christop
are enjoying shore leave. And s
time they must have had! They w
probably playing cards with the i
ahawk slingers, and, running ou
ready wampum, had left eyes, ears,
gers and even whole heads as hosta
in the first international, inter-cc
nental peace convention ever recol
on the fair pages of Hoyle's w
known history of social etiquette.

STODAY'S CHURCH. SERVICES

Under him are five men whose posi-
tions correspond to the assistant man-
agers of Varsity sports. These are the
Intramural managers of fall sports,
minor sports, track, baseball, and bas-
ketball, and they are appointed in the
spring of each year from the staff of
sophomore tryouts who are at work
throughout the year preceeding'
It is the duty of the Intramural de-
partment to handle all interclass and
interfraternity athletics, as well as the
informal teams in swimming, soccer,
hockey, and golf. With the exception
of the latter these sports appear on the

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister-

Sunday, May 29, 1921,

1

ii i n rr

FOUND - AT -LAST

L Place Where You Can

Get a

Real

Satisfying Beefsteak Dinner

lltIlll lllt11ltl t11tI t1tIIlltlUII
TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and William St.
9:30 A. M.--Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning
Service. Rev. Lloyd Merl Wal-
lick, the Lutheran student
pastor, will preach.
Ititllf111i 1111ttlftl#11t1111~i1H111Elittilli
ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
REP. E. C. STELLHORN,
- Pastor
When the pictures of an evo
lutionist's 'imagination are held
tip as facts, as in the descrip-
tion of man's development from
the brute, he leaves the realm
of science and enters that of fic-
tion. We bow to facts but not
to fictions.:
10:30 A.M. - (German) "The E
Evidence of Being Alive Unto
God."
w 7:30 P. M. - (English) "Ador-
ing Him Whom We Cannot
Comprehend."
t1#1111I p#I f111111111Iltlll11

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. Division
Sunday services at 10:30 A. M.
The subject is unannounced.
Testimonial meeting Wednesday
evening at 7:30. A cordial invi-
tation is extended to all. Sun-
day School at 11:45 A. M., to
which pupils under 20 may be
admitted. A public r ading
room, 236 Nickels Arcade, is
open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 12 to 5 o'clock.

I;

MR. BESIMER SERVES THEM

10:40 A. M. - (Memorial Sun-
day)-"Prepare for Peace or
War." A frank discussion of
a great moral issue. Open
discussion to follow.
5:30 P. M.-Meet at the Church
for Outdoors Y. P. R. U.
Session.
A Cordial Welcome to All!

I

Cor. Catherine and DivisiUon Ste
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Raetar
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M.-Holy Communion.
10:30 A. M.-The Annual Serv-
ice for the Veterans of the
Civil, Spanish-American and
World Wars. Sermon by the
Rector, "The Reason for
War."
4:30 P. M. - Evening Service
and Address by the Curate,
"Manuscript Bibles."
ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

/

Isof

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
South University Ave.
Classes for Students
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
MEMORIAL SERVICE
for our soldier dead, for our
own members who have gone.
Iden Chatterton, Dr. G. P. Coler,
Dr. Bacus, Dr. Yutzy, W. L. Bal-
lard, Miss Hattie Hartshorn.
7:30 P. M.-Song Service. Ser-
mon, "Living Waters."
6:30 P. M.-C. E.
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
J. M. W LLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann Street
10:30 A. M.
MEMORIAL SERVICE
J. M. Wells will speak.
"PEACE AND ARMAMENT"
12:00 Noon-Sunday School.
6:30 P. M.-Guild Meeting.

Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

r

Headquarters in Lane Hall.
Classes meet in the "Uppe
Room."

f

OPPOSITE D. U. R. STATION
JUST ABOVE RAE THEATRE

F---

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
MEMORIAL SERVICE
at 10:30
SPECIAL MUSIC BY THE CHOIR:

£

St

Maude Adaerns
Greatest Stage Suecess
Secured for Notion Picture P
SIR JAP

Un

W

Eve

r r
:arting Today
'resentation Only After Years of Constant Effort
4ES M. BARRIE'S
equaled Play
A DefMille
r'Production
a _r
a
Wo(man w
A STAR. CAST
Inckudhng
n. amnd Conrad Nagel
host delightful play of years TOPICS - ORCHESTRA
n its smiles, its tears, its SHOWS |1:30,3:00 4;30 7;00 8.30
and wisdom. 3
Will Interest Every Man
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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALER, D.D., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
10:30 A. M.-"THE ART OF RECEIVING," Pastor's subject.

11

4:30 P. M.-MUSICAL VESPER*SERVICE.

tI

Organ-"In Summer"............ ..............Stebbins
Anthem-"Gallia"........ ............Gounod
Contralto Aria -"O Rest in the Lord" (Elijah).Mendelssohn
Nunc Dimittis.............................Gretchaninof

/

1. "I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes" .... ......................Rogers
Duet-"The Crucifix"....................Saure
Mr. Bowen and Mr. McCandliss
3. Solo-"Face to Face"... ........................Johnson
Miss Irene Straub
4. Anthem-"He Will Come Down Like Rain"'................Buck
6:00 P. M.-C. E. "Overseas Service." In charge of the World Service
Department.

STUDENTS ESPECIALLY INVITED

'i 0~~ lI~1 i 11111II11 iit~ 1W I I 11H UIIIII 0H IL f I

A Paramount
Picture

"K

''

I

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

MEMORIAL SUNDAY

A

MAY 29

Lois Wilso

NLII

Also a
CHRISTY COMEDY

Then
rich
thrills

i

-lt

10:30 A. M.

The Minister will speak on
"THE SOLDIER EMERITUS"

A Play That

mrn-T r&"

-M

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