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January 27, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-01-27

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COLD

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TODAX

DAs AND MIHT W
SERVICE

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VOL. XXX. No. 89.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1920.

PRICE THREE

,_

SOJIElT RUSI
SA-TISFIED WITH
OWN POBEM
-"AMBASSADOR" MARTENS.
TESTIFIES BEFORE SENATE COM-
MITTEE ON RADICAL 1
AFFAIRS
NOT INTERESTED IN
WORLD WIDE REVOLTI

Disclaims Any Connections with
orders in America; Claim
'Country Is Strong

Dis-

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 26.-Soviet Rus-
sia, transformed by assured success
of its leadership at home, is no longer
fired by the missionary zeal which
led its agents and emmissaries during
their first months of its exstemce to
preach world wide revolution, Ludwig
C. A. K. Martens who calls himself
the ambassador from that country to
the United States, testified today be-
fore a senate investigating committee.
Interested in Self Only
The Soviet republic at present, Mar-
tens said, "does'not care what kind of
government other people have," and
has indulged in general revolutionary
propaganda only "when it was on the
defensive, and hard pressed by na-
tions which had armies in the- field
against it."
Today, because it is "strong enough
to fight the world," it has abandoned
the principles first promulgated to
the effect that it can be maintained
only by the destruction of other gov-
ernments everywhere which recognize
property rights and capitalistic'organ
izations.
DIes Action
Martens denied all connection with
revolutionary movements in the Unit-
ed States though admitting some
knowledge of them. He said they were
"purely American, arising out of
American conditions," and as Soviet
agent he had not helped or financed
them or their followers. He had in-
structions from his government he said
to stay clear of interference with
American international affair.
All of his pdblicity efforts, outlined
in his testimony were devoted, he said,
to explaining the Soviet system to the
end that America would recognize the
Soviet as the established government
in Russia.
DRESS REHEARSL HELD
FOR COMY CLUB PLY
PLAY A MOCKERY OF DRAMA
SUCH AS HAMILTON'S
"SCANDAL"
"Alice Sit, by the Fire," the Barrie
play to be presented by the .Comedy
club at 8:15 o'clock tomorrow night
in the Whitney theater, successfully
passed through the final dress re-
hearsal last night.
Professor Nelson Satisfied
Prof. J. R. Nelson, under whose su-
pervision the play is being produced,
stated at the rehearsal last night that
he was very much pleased with the
progress of the comedy and was con-
fident of its success.
Open mockery of drama such as
typified in, Cosmo Hamilton's recent
sensational success, "Scandal," has
led to the creation of humorous sit-
uations in "Alice Sit by the Fire."
Situations Amusing
As in "seandal" the innocent is seiz-
ed ,pon as a convenient fiance when
the heroine finds herself in a trap.
Leading up to this predicament
Barrie has portrayed a mother in the
role of a hardened adventuress in or-
der that her daughter may undertake
the task of rescuing her from a com-
promising position, a duty which the
daughter undertakes despite its re-
qurement of obtaining incriminating
evidence in the form of letters from
a stranger's room at night. -
Phil Diamond's six piece orchestra
will furnish music for the play.
Robbins, '171, Visiting Here-

John F. Robbins, '17M, is visiting
Dean W. B. Hinsdale for a few days.
Robbins was football manager in
1916. -

AWARD HOSPITAL
SHELL CONTRACT
Building and Grounds Department
Will Complete Dormitory
' The contract for construction of the
shell of the new University hospital
has been awarded to the Thompson-
Starrett company, according to Secre-
tary Shirley W. Smith. Work will not
be actively started until weather con-
ditions permit.
Approximate cost of the shell will
be $1,450,000, and the time for com-
pletion has not as yet been set, as the
contract has not been signed.
Betsy Barbour dormitory will be
completed by the buildings and
grounds department of the University,
although some minor parts will be
sublet, stated Mr. Edward C. Pardon,
superintendent of the "department,
yesterday. No contracts for the whole
work have been let because a satis-
factory- bid was not received. A con-
tract has been let fo the plastering.
ATHLETES' ELIGIBILITY
URGED AT SUNDAY MET
STUDENT ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
ADVISES WITH VARSITY
MEN
About 80 Vaisity athletes in all
sports met Sunday morning in the Un-
ion with members 'of the student ath-
letic committee and Robert M. Clancy,
'07, alumni field secretary, to discuss
eligibility. Robert M. Cook, '20E,
'chairman of the eligibility committee
&f the student organzation,- was in
c arge of the meeting.
The purpose of the meeting was to
impress upon the minds of the men
that it is necessary that they pass the
coming examinations if Michigan is to
have the track and baseball teams
material promises. They were told
that the championships of the last
two years can be repeated if they
keep eligible.%
Clancy Represents Alumni
Mr. Clancy spoke from the stand-
point of the alumni, saying that the
great body of Michigan-men over the
country, feels the disastrous football
season last fall even more keenly than
does the student body, and that they
are resolved that 'if their co-opera-
tion can do anything that the failure
will not be repeated.
"Michigan has the largest body of
living almni of --y university in the
country," saia Mr. Clancy, "and they
are as influential in the affairs of the
nation as the alumni from any uni-
versity, bar none. And wherever the
Michigan man has made his victorious
way, there you will find a man who is
willing to do his share for the Univer-
sity. The alumni are depending upon
you men to pass these examinations."
Team Captains Speak
Carl Johnson, '20, track captain;
Vernon Parks, '21, baseball captain;
Carl Hogan, '20E; Floyd A. Rowe, '08,
state physical director, and Phil G.
Bartelme, '98, athletic director, also
spoke.
GRAVITY CONTRIBUTES TO
DISEASES, SAYS HINSDALE
Erect Attitude Requires Adjustments
To Maintain Posture Sta-
bility /

"Gravity helps ,to make children
bow-legged, old people"'round should-
ered and is ,a contributing factor to
many pains and aches," said Dean W.
B.' Hinsdale of the Homoeopathic
school, in a lecture Sunday afternoon
on "Pre-disposing Causes of Disease."
Dr. Hinsdale explained that when
man was changed in the course of his
evolution into an animal that assumed
the upright posture, gravity tended to
pull,down many organs, thus helping
.to develop displacements among both
men and women, from which quad-
rupeds are free.
. Man has not yet attained his full
adaptability so that he is free from
the tendency that is pulling his vital
organs away from their natural at-
tachments. The erect attitude re-
quires a series of adjustments in order
that the upright posture may be
,maintained in stability.
Other prominent pre-disposing
pauses of disease are here.dity, envir-
onment and personal element.

SPEAKER DEPICTS
EUROPEAN NEEDS
Settlement Worker Declares Condi-
tions in War-Stricken Lands
Still Bad
OBTAINED FACTS WHILE RED
CROSS WORKER IN WAR ZONES
Housing and food problems in Eu-
rope today were revealed in detail by
Miss Jane Addams, Chicago social
worker, in her lecture Sunday even-
ing in Hill auditorium. Miss Addams
has personally seen the conditions she
described, as she travelled through a
large part of the war zones while
serving there as a Red Cross recon-
struction worker.
Swiss Care for Many Refugees
The Swiss cared for thousands of
Italian, French, and Austrian chil-
dren who were starving during the
war, according to Miss Addams. These
children were shipped in to them and
made a most deplorable sight as they
were landed at the stations. They
were listless, starved-looing, and
were suffering with rachitis, twisted
limbs, and emaciation.
One incident that Miss Addams told
of happened to a soldier in Vienna.
He was seen to give a biscuit to a
hungry child, and was instantly mob-
bed by about 200 children who liter-
ally tore his clothing from' him in
their mad search for more'biscuits on
his person.
Discusses Housing Situation
Municipal housing is being taken
up in every locality in England,
Hampstead Heath being the most
flourishing" example. The English
parliament discusses the housing sit-
nation as of more importance than
anything else, says Miss Addams.
In France, too, the housing prob-
lem is vital. Here it is difficult to
carry out the latest schemes for hous-
ing because the French seem to think
everything should be restored to ex-.
actly the conditions it was in before
the war.
Food Scarce in Germany
Conditions now prevalent in Ger-
many were also described by Miss Ad-
dams. Food is very scarce there and
also very high priced. People are still
living on strict irations
In one place she visited the people
were exceedingly happy because the
soup to be 'rationed to them on that
day was to have some fat in it. And
when the soup was made, Miss Ad-
dams found that its fat consisted of a
piece of vegetable fat about the size
of an egg, this being placed in a huge
caldron of soup as large as the big-
gest kettles in our hotel kitchens.
Children of Saxony who look to be
(Continued on Page Six)
TO ELARGE POST-OFFICE
Growing Business Demands More
Commodious Quarters 1
For the purpose of enlarging the
campus branch of the postoffice the
postoffice department of Ann Arbor
has rented the vacant store adjoining
the present quarters on the east, in
Nickels Arcade.
As a result of the crowded condi-
tions during the past year it has been
found necessary to enlarge both the
lobby and the working part of the
branch office.-

Staff Inereased
The lobby will be made over half
again as large as it is now, one more
window for parcel post installed, one
more letter-drop put in, facilities gen-
erally enlarged, and a new man add-
ed to the force for the purpose of
cancelling and sacking both mail and
parcel post packages. He will work
at the window during rush hours.
New 'arrangements are only wait-
ing for the 'arrival of ythe mahogany
screen for the enlargement of the
lobby, when it will be immediately
installed. It is hoped that will be
done at least by March 1.
$75,000 Business Seen
In speaking of the reasons for the
enlargements Postmaster H. J. Abbott
'said, "The business done by the
branch during the past year has been
enormous, in fact, it has been nearly
one and one-half.times as large as that
required for a first class postoffice,.
which is $40,000. I fully expect that
the business will be $75,000 during the
current year."

INJURY TO WILSON HINDERS
BRILLIANT GUARDING GAME
(Special to The Daily)
Champaign, Ill., Jan. 26.-Illinois
defeated Michigan here tonight by a
score of 41 to 14 in an easy victory.
Duke Dunne was the star for the de-
feated outfit, but was winded early in
the contest and was unable to be of
any later assistance to his team mates.
Take Early Lead
The first half opened with the Wol-
verines taking the lead. They held
it only until the Sucker state quintet
warmed up, however.-
Wilson Big Factor
Wilson played a wonderful game
for the Michigan outfit, 'but his guard-
ing was not sufficient to cover all five
men of the opposing squad, and his
efforts went only to keep the Illinois
five from piling up a larger score
Wilson was thrown to the floor dur-
ing a tense moment in the game, and
was injured. He remained in the fray,
however, but was unable to play the
brillia'nt way in which he had starred
earlier in the contest. ,
Shots Hurried
The floor work of the Michigan out-
Ifit was better than the score indicat-
ed. The failure of the Wolverine out-
fit to place their shotg in the baskets
proved their undoing. Fast work by
the Illinois five hurried the Michigan
forwards to such an extent that their
shots were rarely placed correctly.
COMMITTEE- APPrOYES
COMPULSORY TRINING
(By Associated Press)
Washington; Jan. 26.-By a vote of
9 to 5 the senate military committee
today approved provisions providing
for compulsory military training for
boys between 18 and 21 years inclu-
sive and ordered a favorable report
on the army reorganization bd1l. The
training period was fixed at four
months.
In addition to establishing compul-
sory military training, the bill pro-
vides for the establishment of an army
to be divided into a citizens' army,
composed of men who have received
the compulsory training and a stand-
ing army consisting of 280,000 en-
listed men and 18,000 officers, and na-
tional guard.
Specific provision is made in the
bill that the citizen army cannot be
(Continued on Page Six)
POET TO PICTURE LINCOLN
!)rinkwater, "Abraham Lincoln" Au-
thor, Will Speak Thursday
. '--
John Drinkwater, the English dra-
matist and ppet, will speak at 8
o'clock Thursday evening in Hill audi-
torium, giving an English view of
Abraham Lincoln.
Dramatist's Play Popular
- Especial interest is attached to the
speaker and his subject by Oratorical
association officials, because he is the
author of the play, "Abraham Lin-
coln," which has had an extensive run
in England and now is playing in New
York.
Mr. Drinkwater, in speaking of Lin-
coln, has been quoted as saying that
the writer of a drama must choose be
tween the play of action in which the
interest hangs upon the unrelated

sensation of excitement, ,and the play
where action is used only as a means
to show the revelations and processes
of human character.'
Lincoln Inspiring
'Abraham Lincoln" is a play of the
second sort. The martyred presi-
dent's integrity of character and the
fact that he died adequate to every
occasion that had unexpectedly and
suddenly beset his path made Lincoln
a man who has stirred artists, poets,
and sculptors, and endeared him in the
,hearts of the common man, according'
to Mr. Drinkwater, and it is these two
elements that he has used to develop
the play.

ILLINOIS DOWNS
MICHIGAN 41-14

Dunne Plays Whirlwind Game
First Part of Fast
Contest

forI

OPEN DORMITORY
TO J-HOP WOMEN
Chairman Desires Further Informa-
Lion to Facilitate Work
All men who are bringing out-of-
town girls to the Hop and who have
not as yetj secured accommodations
for them are requested to notify R.
Dillon, '21, chairman of the Hop, as
soon as possible in order that he may
secure rooms for them at Martha Cook
dormitory.
It is desired that this be done as
soon as possible so that further plans
may be made if these accommodations
are found to be insufficient.
. Dillon also wishes that all persons
who have not yet been placed in any
booth communicate with him imed-
iately.
O00O SPREAD NOT IMMEDITEP
OFFICIALS WILL TAKE ALL PRE.-
CAUTIONS TO CHECKE
DISEASE
That there is no immediate dangerE
of an influenza epidemic in Ann Arbort
is the opinion of Dr. Warren E. For-1
sythe, of the University Health serv-
ice, and Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city
health officer. "There are about 100
cases in the city, but most of them
are very light, and about 50 per centt
could hardly be called influenza," said
Dr. Wessinger.
No Serious Cases.f
In speaking of the cases among the
students, Dr. Forsythe said, "There
were a few more illnesses reportedf
today, making the total among those
attending the University between 50E
and 60. None of these cases could be
called serious, however." .
It was thought'that the sickness will
not be widely spread this year as
many have feared. Not a single seri-
ous case has yet been reported, and
the only two pneumonia patients in
the hospital at present 'a ere ill be-
fore any cases of influenza were noted
in Ann Arbor.
Instructions Emphasized
Every precaution will be taken,
however, to check the spread of the
disease. Dr. Forsythe has called a
meeting of representatives of all fra-
ternities, sororities, house clubs and
large rooming houses at noon today,
at 'which he ,will outline a number of
influenza symptoms and will give in-
structions for holding the disease in
abatement. In speaking of his in-
structions, which were printed in The
Daily yesterday, Dr. Forsythe espe-
cially emphasized the first point:, "If
you think you have'the influenza, go
to bed and stay there."
PROFESSORS WILL ADDRESS
DETROIT DENTAL SESSIONS

PACT FLUNG B9
.ON SENATE FLI
CONFERENCEI

REPUBLICAN NEAR-SPLIT BRI
TREATY BEFORE SOLONS,
AGAIN
BI-PAR TISAN SECRET
MEET GAINS NOTHI
Lodge Says No Change Can Be M
in Article 10 and Doctrine
Reservations
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 26 .-The wl
question of peace treaty ratificat
was flung back to the floor of
senate with the virtual collapse
day of the bi-partisan conferenc
The end came after Senator Lo
of Massachusetts, the Repub lcan le
er, had informed Democrat led
Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska t
there could be no change in ther i
ervations respecting the Monroe A
trine and the much discussed art:
10.
Democrats Bolt
In the face of this the Democ
walked out of the private confere
'agreeing meanwhile to make a re
to Senator Lodge early tomorrow.
First news of the breakingof
diplomatic relations, so to speak,
given 'by Senator Hitcllcock in
statement which broadly intima
that failure of Republicans to e
ground in an effort to reach a hi
of compro3te was due to the thre
ened revolt of Republicans.
Senate leaders including many
dently seeking an end to the long V
tracted treaty debate, frankly
that'the question would be fought
on the floor beginning probably
morrow.
Say Nothing to Be Gained
Senator Hitchcock declined to sj
ulate on the possibility of so earl
renewal of hostilities but most De'
crats declared nothing was to
gained by further secret conferen
HASKINS WILL TALK DI
PEACE CONFERENCE WO
HARVARD GRADUATE DEAN .w
SON'S ADVISOR AT
TRIBUNAL
"The Peace Conference" will be
sub'ject of Charles Homer Hash
dean of the Harvard graduate scl
who speaks today at 4:15 o'cloc
the lecture room of the Natural
ence building. Dr. Haskins acted
'personal advisor of President Wil
at the recent peace tribunal.
historian of Note
The speaker has studied in sev
of the foreign universities and h
several degrees of distinction. He
made a study of conditions of
mediaeval age, particularly of the
ciety and the church, and is the
thor of numerous books on sub
of mediaeval interest. Prof. Cl
H. Van Tyne, of the history dep
ment, declares Dr.; Haskins to t
historian bf some note, and a re
nized authority on his subject.
Effinger Urges Attendance
Speaking of Dr. Haskins, Dean I
R. Effinger, of the literary coll
said: "Every time a professor f
another institution comes to 3
school go to hear him and comi
him with your own instructors. I
Haskins is one of the best infor
men of the country and should in
est you. There are many things <
nected with a education that are
found in textbooks, and such s ea
are important features which sh
not be overlooked."

I

Dental Institute to Make Trip
Inspection to University
Thursday

'of

Four members of the University
faculty are on the. program to be giv-
en during the 27th annual meeting of
the American Institute of Dental
Teachers to be held in the Hotel Stat-'
ler, Detroit, today, Wednesday, and
Thursday.
Dr. R. W. Bunting, of the dental
department, presidentof the insti-
tute,: will deliver the president's ad-
dress today. It will concern, "Criti-
cism on Teaching Methods." Profs.
J. B. Edmondson and G. M. Whipple,
of the education department, will also
speak tonight.
Dr. M. L. Ward, of the dental de-
partment, will read a paper dealing
with the teaching of dentistry at the
Wednesday session.
Members in attendance at the con-
vention will make a trip of inspec-
tion to the University Thursday aftr-
ernoon.
ATHLETIC BOARD HEAD TO
ADDRESS DETROIT ALUMNI
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman of
the Board in Control of Athletics, is
to address the University of Michigan
club of Detroit, at their weekly lunch-
eon at 12:15 o'clock Wednesday, Jan.
28, at the Hotel Cadillac in Detroit. a
According to the announcement of
the luncheon committee, Professor
Aigler is to tell the alumni the facts!
of the athletic situation, and is to ans-
wer many questions which the alumni'
can only guess about, concerning the
present situation.

TO HOLD FLU CONFERE
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe d
es a representative of every
ternity, sorority, house
and large rooming house to
tend a short meeting to be
at noon today in the Nat
Science auditorium in whic'
will give instructions to be
en back to the houses cone
ing the prevention of influe

A

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