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June 01, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I &.1 5a&.d £

OF THE UNIVERSITY
CHIGAN
cept Monday during the Univer-
>l of Student Publications.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
:clusively entitled to the use for
hes credited to it or not otherwise
ocal news published therein.
Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
nail, $3.50.
wilding, Maynard street.
itorial, 24=4"
:ed 30o words, if signed, the sig-.
- in print but as an evidence of.
be published in The Daily at the
at or mailed to The Daily office.
ceive no consideration. No manl
the writer incloses postage.
arily endorse the sentiments ex-
will not be received after 8 o'clock
n.
Al STAFF

give due consideration to his membership in the
Alumni association and remember what it will mean
to him. It is his chance to make his connection
with his alma mater permanent, his opportunity
for proving .o what extent he is really a Michigan
man.

Mary Roberts RMine
Latest Book

DITOR...................HARRY M. CAREY
K. Ehlbert Joseph A. Bernstein
.Campbell ,H1ugh Hitchcock _
e Brophy " Renaud Sherwood
McManis
. .s.......H Hardy Heth, Lsee M. Woodruff
............Brewster Campbell
... .. ..... . John I. Dakin
..........Robert C. Angell
tment......................Marguerite Clark
.. ......Thomias Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

Assistants
k G. F. Clarke
e Thomas '. Whin
aldo R. W. Wrobleski
er George Reindel
ort Dorothy Monfort
)w Minnie Muskatt
kery Harry B. Grun
fer W. F. Elliott

Winefred Biethan
nery Robert D. Sage
i MainNichols
Frances Oberholtrer
rt Edna Apel
1~. P. Lovejoy
dy* Charles Murchison
Russell Fletcher
GAFF

HIGH SPOTS
As a people we are suffering from an aggravat-
ed case of watching the high spots. The, disease is
not althogether new, but the present attack is seri-
ous. Its ravages have already made the patient
blind to the everyday, wholesome foundations of
life........
The eccentricities of college professors form a
choice subject of gossip in educational communities,
but no one bothers much about the hundreds of-
dreary quiz papers which the professors have to
read and correct. College students are supposed to
be lazy, indifferent, sporty and sometimes boisterous,
but there are nearly two hundred and sixty thous-
and of them altogether in this country, and any-
ope who supposes that in the main these young
men and women are not engaged in the process of
learning is merely ignorant of the achievements of
education. Some of us who are older are inclin-
ed, at times, to an adverse opinion of young people.
They seem superficial, irreverent, careless of all
the deeper things of life, abut every minute of the
day many of these boys and girls are graduating
into mature men and women who are carrying on
the work of 'the world.-Satyrday Evening Post.
DIGNITY ON SENIOR BENCHES
Both in a utilitarian and a symbolical way the
Senior benches are important adjuncts of the camp-
us. Although nominally the property of each suc-
ceeding Senior class, their use has been hospitably
offered to the members of the' next lower classes,
and' in their' true function they serve as shady
seats where all college men, except at times fresh-
men, are welcome to recline and smoke or talk.
Of late it is noticeable that for a very few, these
ways of whiling away time between classes have
become too tame, and, in search of light entertain-
ment novelties, plans,-arising no doubt entirely
from thoughtlessness-have been followed which
are objectionable and disrespectful to ' the women
on the campus.
That these methods of securing amusement are
out of keeping with Michigan ideals is evident even
to those who participate in them most enthusiastic-
ally. It is regrettable that they should be led by
upperclassmen, by whom the proper use of the
benches should be most prized and Michigan. spirit
should be best understood. Thoughtless acts such
as these harm Michigan's good name abroad and
should be discouraged no matter how small the
group which engages in them.

TWO
STORES

G RASFHEAM'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

r

DETROIT T ITED LINES imIIIIJO 11t.iIIIIIIIIIII li
In Effect. May ,18, '1920Bewn
Betwe- w~
Detroit, Ann' Arbor and Jackson J V S T
(Eastern Standard Time) r
Limited and Express cars leave for E U.
Detroit, 6:10 a. m. and hourly to9:0E..iniversi~t
.9:10 p. m. UI V I L
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:40 a. mn. and
every two hours to '8:40 p. m .Ex-
presses at 9:45 a. m. and every two Eighteen haf
two hours to 9:45 p. im.-
Locals to Detroit- 5:55am., 7:05 a.m. = ed on handm
and every two hours to 9:05 p.m.,
also 11:00 p.m. To Ypsilanti only, with yellow
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 aim.
Locals to Jackson - 7:45 a.m., and Pr
12:10 a.m.
CARD OF THANKS
The Overseas Club wishes to thank
TWA
the Btu-Maize shop for the baskets of
flowers donated for the Memorial day
services in.Hill Auditorium.-Adv. rE tllII!IlllI1111l
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

OUT

A BRAND NEW

yofMichigan Souve

AFFINITIES

!U.

ideolored photographs j
made paper. Beautifully
and tied with silk cord.
ice only $1.00

1

I

TWO
STORES

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORI

'I

ANAGER..................PAUL E. CHOLETTE
....LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covel
....feAs.......... ........Henry Whiting
...... Edward Priehs
...........CurtP. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

SENIORS
PERMANENCY - LIKENESS - QUALITY

.-. in-

:;

D. P. Joyce
Wdter P. P. Hutchinson
Raymond K. Corwin
ngs Lester W. Millard
tion concerning news for any
t editor, who has full charge
veek. will be Monday
ty night, J. W. 'Kelly;
rke; Thursday night,
C. M. Campbell. Sat-
S1, 1920.
will meet at 5 o'clock

TRY
T UDITa
Portraits That .Please"

"Ready" Clothes Re
fleet the character
of those men who
wear them.

STOCK SALESMEN WANTED
I have a few permanent positions for students graduating
this year. Previous 'experience not necessary. Inexperienced
salesmen are earning from $300.00 to $600.00 monthly. I
am selling the Treasury Stock of a Detroit Company which
has been in, business 3.7 years and in the past 3 years has paid
77 2-3% in dividends. Its net earnings for the next 12
months based on orders now on the books, 'it is estimated, will
be 60% on its $1,000,000 capital. New salesmen will be
given a short course of instruction, furnished prospect leads and
receive thorough co-operation. Will employ under-graduates
during their summer vacation.
For full particulars write to

_.
4

UL PARADE TRADITION
as this characteristic, that it
s of its associations instead 'of
re ceremonial of observance.
vhich separate the holiday from
: celebrates, the story-ties of
iliant deeds tighten their hold
ng anew and vividly the mem-
r a high and lasting patriotism.
, smaller in numbers than had
vertheless a fine significance' in
>preciation for the sacrifice of
ed and died in the same great
comrades in the line of march.
.ization of our debt will grow,
de to the simple ceremony, and
3w too recent struggle will be
s and history of past wars to
ete symbolism of reverence for

I

the Telescope

Only one

i

A Sure Sign of Summer
One half pair of pants at extra price.
per man.-Ad in Kingsford. Gazette.

They are clean cut,
virile, refined and

dependable.

Al

parade, with all marching
,ardless of rank insignia,
:an but also extremely fit-
mon and indistinguishable
h all bear' alike for those
[t. May next year bring
participants and more of
shed Monday's ceremony.
MNI INTEREST
pproaching thi time when
on the campus, the ques-'
er as towhat his relation-
R be af ter he has graduat-
should be given the most
y Michigan man who has
>Il'ge life on this campus
ciate 'the traditions of his
petuate his interest in his

Stude-Say is this "affectionate" pie?
Landlady-Affectionate pie? What kind is that?
Stude-Why the pie is so thin the crusts are
actually stuck on each other.
A Happy Ending
"So you're going to take in Shuter's lectures on
how to write a Union opera."
"Yeh, and I've got a dandy scheme for next
year's opera. You see I have all the principals
killed in.the first act."
"All the leading men killed in the first act?
Why, a show of that kind wouldn't be popular with
the audience."
"It wouldn't, eh? You don't know who I have
in mind for the principal roles."
No, Clarice, the nave in Westminster Abbey is
not one of the British Aisles.
Stranger-How many hospitals have you in
connection with the University.
Stude-Two, University and Prohibition.
Stranger-What do you mean by a "prohibi-
tion" hospital?
Stude-The Homoeopathic. They don't believe
in taking anything.

DAVID WHITNEY
BUILDING
Woodward at Grand Circus

Telephone-Cherry

2705.

I' ...______________

CHARLES VAN KEUREN,
1040 Penobscot Bldg.,

;

for the cigarette that gives a new
thrill to the smoker whose taste
is "fed up". Spur's new blend of
fragrant Oriental leaf and mild
home-grown tobacco does just that
p S!;pur. 3J pr~~
:a
Ipur=
t -

DETROIT, MICHIGAN

r' ,

r
here is no other institution which can
e need of the alumnus for keeping
ith Univ ersity activities as the Alumni
'his orginization is sustained primar-
.ing the 'graduate with information
University which will be of interest
r givirtg him an opportunity to voice
throiugh the association. It is, the
bond to preserve the graduates' stu-
n the, University.
cad emic year is so near its close, it
Lat the men who are seniors remem-
Iti ons to the University. The Class
d do little in preserving the old class
r anging for class reunions and other
g raduation, if it were not for the co-
hielp of the association. It is one of
tant duties of the association to help
imialate the growth of local alumni

He asked fair Maud to marry;-
By letter she replied,
He read it-she refused him,
He shot himself and died.
He might have been alive now,
And she his happy bride,
If he had read the postscript
Upon the other side.-Ex.

Phrenologist-Ahl, my young friend, you have,
I perceive, a very pronounced bump of knowl-
edge.
Stude-Well, I ought to. That's where the en-
cyclopedia fell on my head.
Dear Noah:
Is there anything that will mend :a broken
heart? Heartbroken.
You might try re-pairing.
Famous Closing Lines
"Ha, a promising student," he muttered as he
heard the young man stalling off the landlady for
the room rent. NOAH COUNT.

Smart "brown-and-silver" pack-
age, with triple wrapping to keep
Spurs-fresh and rich.

should

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