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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1920 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[I'll

TESTS'

FIELD CROWDED
BOOSTERS OF MANY
TEAMS

WITH

terfraternity indoor baseball has
Tn an exceedingly large number to
y field and an onlooker wouid
ed be surprised at the large
unt of enthusiasm displayed by
various aggregations yesterday..
Chi won from Phi Kappa Sigma
he large score of 8 to 2, Phi Del-
'heta lost a hotly contested fra-
to Delta Upsilon, 8 to 5, while
Gamma Delta won a swatting
by the score of 22' to 14 from the
ks.
)nday's games: between Alpha
Omega and Zeta Psi, Knickerbock-
nd Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kap-
igma and Beta Theta Pi and Her-
ge and Beta Phi. These teams will
at 4 o'clock on south Ferry field,
e at 7 o'clock Theta Xi will meet
Delta Chi.
tesday Sigma Phi and Theta Chi;
Psi and Phi Sigma Kappa; Trigon
Delt4 Chi; Phi Sigma Delta and
ia Delta Phi *ill clash for
lball honors on south Ferry field.
e games will occur at 4 oclock,
e Phi Alpha Delta will meet
a Alpha Kappa at 7 o'clock.'
iesday will see the start of the
class ball series andthe game
h will be between the J-lits and
Architect teams promises to be
of great interest. The Archi-
have an exceptionally strong
ry and receive strong support
the garden men as well as hav-
an infield which sputs forth a
d of very tight fielding. On the
r hand the J-lits have practiced
her consistently and play well
resuilt. Because of the fact that
have played so often together
that their players are consistent
gers an exceedingly interesting
e will probably result from the
ilng of these two teams.
PULSORY ATHLETICS PLAN
'F NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY
tre Dame, Ind., May 1.-Notre
e university is about to enter
a new era of athletic expansion.
approval of a general plan for
ulsory athlptic education, which
submitted to the university board
hletic control by Athletic Direct-
ockne, marks the first official ac-
taken on the proposal.
e plan will be worked out in de-
:o meet Notre Dame's special re-
ments and will then be preseht-
) the university faculty board for
approval. 6
NUMBER 1
(Contnued from Page One)'
counter came in the ninth as a
Itof a two bagger by Slayger.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS' NOTICE
Managing editors and business managers of The Michigan Daily,
Michiganensian, Gargoyle, Chimes, Students' Directory, Athletic pro-
gram, the managing editor of the Wolverine and any other publica-
tion officers needed, will be appointed for the ensuing year by the
Board in Control of Studlent Publications on Saturday, May 8, 1920.
Applications for any of these positions will be received by the
Board at any time prior to the day of said meeting. Applications
and recommendations should be addressed to the chairman of the
Board, Prof. F. N. Scott, and may be mailed or handed to him or may
be filed with Miss Allen at the Board office at the Press building.
The Board rules relative to appointments are as follows:
Sec. 3. On or before the first day of May of each year, the man-
aging editor and business manager of each of the publications under
the control of this Board, shall recommend, by letter to the chair-
man of this 'Board, members of their staffs to fill the positions of .
managing editor. and business manager respectively. The letters
of recommendation shall set forth the names of the men on the staff
considered available for the place, their qualifications and terms of
service on the publications in question and the reasons for choosing
the preson receiving the highest recommendation before the others.
Sec. 4. At any time before the date set for the appointment of
the business manager and managing editor of publication or pub-
lications under the control of this Board, any student in the Univer-
sity may make application for either position by letter addressed to.
the chairman of this Board, setting forth the experience and qualifi-
cations of the applicant for the position sought. All such applica-
tions will be considered by this Board at the time of making the
appointments.
E. R. SUNDERLAND,
t 1 Business Manager of the Board
in Control of Student Publications.

OPEN INDUSTRIAL
U. AT AKRON, OHIO

College Professors on Faculty
Goodyear Rubber Company
school

Akron, Ohio, May 1.-An industrial
university has been opened here by
the Goodyear Tire and Rubber com-
pany for its employees.
The university provides, educational
work ranging from grade classes to
post-graduate college courses, in ad-
dition to a special Americanization
department for the foreign born. The
school -has a faculty of 117 college
professors. It has 5,200 men and wo-
men enrolled in its 600 classes. The
school has 65 class rooms.
Already the new industrial univer-
sity has an enrollment nearly -as large
as some of the larger state univer-
sities. One of the aims of the univer-
sity will be to round out incomplete
college careers for men and women
for whom the college doors never
again will open.
DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION PLAN.
/NED FOR ATHENA'- PROGRAM
A Democratic convention will be
the program at an open meeting of
Athena Literary society at 7:15
o'clock Tuesday night on the fourth
floor of University hall.
William McAdoo will be nominated
by Gladys Boughton, '22, William J.
Bryan by Doris Gracey, '21, Governor
Cox by Rebecca Condon, '22, Edward
Edwards by Margaret Stone, '22, and
J. Mitchell Palmer by Irma Taylor,
'21. Critic for the evening will be
Lelah Stephens, '20, ind parliamen-
tarian, Adele Ungar, '23.
Tb. DaIl soatanas the stest Gass .
elated Pres News.--Av.
CAMPUS ELECTION NOTICE
Nominations from all organ-
izations and all classes must be
in by Monday, May 3, at the lat-
* est. Nominations should be tak-
pn to the Union desk, addressed
to the chairman of the All-cam-
pus election committee of the
Student council.

of

,Go to
JOHN KAUPP'S
609 E. William St.
FOR
"GOOD EATS"
Things Cooked as You
Like Them
1-MINUTE SERVICE
for breakfast. Be on
time for your 8 o'clocks

I

Private lessons in mod
ball-room dancing.

I

JEANETT
KRUSZKA

SCHOOL OF
DANCING

Studio:
516 E. William St.
Phone 1422-J
Residence Phone 1780-W

Regular

Meals Sun. Night

I

HOME BUILDERS

of today desire above all else two
things - comfort and elegance.
Nothing will help supply this want
better than an artistic floor or table
lamp, for it lends an air of refine-
ment and cheer to any home.
We carry a wide variety oj these
lamps and sell at reasonable
terms

_ _ _

W'HAT'S GOING ON

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SUNDA
11:50-Dr. Newman speaks at Bap-
tist Guild.
12:00-Professor Nenderson speaks to
students at Presbyterian church.
12:10-Discussion group of students in
Congregational church. Prof. J. H.
Brumm speaks on "The College Stu-
dent and Orthadoxy.
12 :15-Triangles meet at the Union.
2:30-Union orchestra practice, see-
ond floor of the Union. It is nec-
essary that every member includ-
ing those who did not make the
Opera trip be present to rehearse
for movie show next Tuesday.
6:00-Presbyterian Christian Endeav-
or social half-hour, followed by
meeting at 6:30.
6:30-taptist guild will hold annual
election.
6:30 - Congregational students' club
meets. Prof. David Friday speaks on
"Labor and the Impending Financial
Crisis."
6:30-Unitarian guild forum. Prof.
J. C. Hildner speaks on "The Three
Great Impulses."
6:30-The Wesleyan Guildameets with
Herbert Twining as leader. A so-
cial half hour will immediately
precede.
7:30-Dr. Newman gives a stereopti-
con lecture at Baptist church on
the Red Cross work in Siberia.
MONDAY
3:00-Talks to freshmen will be re.
sumed next Monday afternoon in
Hill auditorium when Prof. David
Friday will speak. Attendance of all
freshmen is requiredas usual.
3:30-Fresh lit baseball practice on
Ferry field. All men interested
should report for drill.
4:00-Fresh Law class meets in room
C of the Law building.
4:15-Mr. J. A. K. Thomson speaks
in room C of the Law building on
"The Romantic Element In, Grek
Literature."~
4:30 - Fraternity section of the
Hutchins' Portrait committee meets
on third floor of the Union.
7:00-Rehearsal 6f Michigan Union
orchestra at the Union. Important.
7:20 - Independents section of the
Hutchins' Portrait committee on
second floor of the Union.
7:30-Paramecium soiety meets at
the Union. There will be an out of
town speaker.,
:00-Acolytes meet in the Morris
Seminary room in Mason hall.
8 :00-"L'Ami Fritz" Cerle Fran-
cals play, given in Sarah Caswell
hall.
TUESDAY
6:00-Kentucky club will hold a din.
ner Tuesday room 323, Union.
Those wishing to reserve plates
call Burge at 2574.
7:00-Freshmen band meets in Uni-
versity hall.
7:15--Athena Literary society will
meet.
7:30-DIde. club holds smoker in
room 318-20 of the Union.,
U-NOTICES
Seniors are advised to get their caps
and gowns as soon before Thurs-
day as possible to avoid the ex-
pected congestion of the last
minute. The caps and gowns of

all clases, that placed their orders
with George J. Moe on North Uni-
versity avenue have arrived and are
now ready. for distribution.
Art exhibition open daily from 2 to 5
o'clock at Memorial hall.
WISCONSIN GETS WISAS
CONFERE NC;E:IEXT Y EA
i OFFICERS FOR ENSUING YEAR
CHOSEN AT FINAL SES-
SION
Next year the W. S. G. A. confer-
ence will be held at the University
of Wisconsin. Marie Bodden of that
university was elected presjdent of
the association for the coiing year.
These results were recorded at the
business meeting which took place
during yesterday morning's session.
Ann Young of Ohio State university,
was elected vice-president and treas-
urer of the association, and Margeret
Hawkins of the University of Missouri,
secretary.
Extend Membership
Membership in the Middle Western
Conference association was extended
to Knox college, Pennsylvania State,
and theUniversities of Kentucky, In-
diana, and South Dakota.
The remainder of this final session
of the conference was devoted to a
general discussion of the problems
facing the W. S. G. A. in the different
universities and colleges. Various
traditions, methods of stimulating
class spirit, and the dancing problem
were discussed at length. Many of
the delegates described special condi-
tions confronting the association at
their particular universities, and ask-
ed for suggestions for their improve-
ment.
Picnic Plans Changed
The picnic breakfast which was to
have been given up the river. was
served at Barbour gymnaium instead
because of the condition of the ground
after the rain yesterday. Following
this the delegates were taken to the
various places of interest in Ann Ar-
bor in automobiles, and the confer-
ence picture was taken.
ROSES DEFEAT MICHIGAN'S
INFORMAL SOCCER OUTFIT
The Roses soccer team defeated the
informal soccer representatives of
Michigan in a long and grueling con-
test yesterday afternoon. at Ferry
field. The final score being 4 to 2
shows that the much famed Roses ag-
gregation were by no means over-
whelming the Wolverines.
Girls Reserve Clubs Plan Banquet
- Each Girl Reserve corps ,of the city
Y. W. C. A. will share in giving a
mother and daughter banquet at 6
o'clock Friday evening at the Bethle-
hem church. The' purpose of the ban-
quet grows out of a constantly grow-
ing need of girls to appreciate their
mothers and an understanding on the
part of the mothers, of needs, desires
and visions of the girls.
Each coms will decorate its own
individual 'table illustrating some
phase of Girl Reserve work. A prize
will be offerpd to the corps for the
best table at the least cost.
MULLANES TAFTIES at Ties'
Drug Store, 117 So. Main St. Re-
ceived every week.-Adv.

The Detroit Edison Co.
bisplay Rgom, Main and William Sta.
Phone 2300

,y

nZ

c

Mail Orders Phone Orders
Promptly Filled Promptly Filled
Established 1857
THE MAY SALE OF WHITE -OF COURSE
IS THE TIME TO BUY 'YOUR LINGERIE. SHARP RE-
DUCTIONS ON DAINTY UNDERTHINGS BEGINS ON
TU E SD AY, M AY 4

This MaySale is an annual event. It is designed to offer to
YOU, the softest, daintiest, feminine undergarments at the lowest
prices. It is no ordinary sale. In it, are the newest goods-all the
chemises, camisoles, gowns, underskirts made of white muslins, nain
sooks, pink or white satin, and silk crepe de chine. The.,economy
of durable white muslins, the luxury of pink silk are offered"to you
at prices close to cost. These appealing bits of fine muslin, silk,
lace, embroidery are divided into six lots.

11

11

a

Come In and let us show them to you

4 ,. , .
1 ...

Lot 1 -$1.50,

totals .........33
Mehigan
AB '
le, ss........5
hgessner, lf .... 5
in, rf.........3
, 3b .........4
Boven, cf .... 4
us,2b......4
all, lb ........4-
bach, c .......4
s, p ..........3

1 5 27 7 4

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2

Former values- $1.75, 1.98
GOWNS
Muslin, Stitched and Smocked

CHEMISES

otals ........36 3 8 27 9
NUMBER 2

Ribbon Strap, Blue Stitching
Lot 3-- $2.49,
Former value - $2.98
CHEMISES
Envelope, Fine Filet Lace
GOWNS
Blue and Pink Embroidered
Underskirts - wide flounces

Lot 2-$1.98
Former values - $2.25, $2.50
GOWNS
Embroidery-and Lace-shirred
Yokes
CHEMISES
Flesh and White; Some
Bloomer Stile
UNDERSKIRTS
Embroidered Flounces
Lot 4-- $2.98,
Former value - $3.25, $3.50l
GOWNS
Flesh Batiste, Embroidered
Muslins
CHEMISES'
Sheer Muslin, Bodice Tops,
Silk Nainsooks
Underskirts, lace flounces

Lot 5 - $3.49
Former value - $4.00, $4.25
CHEMISES
Two Style Bodice Top,
hand embroidered
GOWNS
Dotted and Striped Crepe,
Muslins, Ribbon and Lace
Trimmed
Underskirts, fine embroidery

000

(Contnued from Page One)
university combinations. Syra-
finished second; Cornell, third;
ago, fourth, and Princeton, fifth.
e field events were hotly contest-
>ut no records were broken.' In
.00 yard dash Scholz of Missouri
ed his usual good form by win-
from a fast field of eastern
ters in 10 and 1-5 seconds. The
vault was won by J. Landers of
sylvania, with a height of 12 feet
hes; W. Reynolds, Pennsylvania,
first in the high jump with a leap
feet, 1-4 inch; Emery of Pennsyl-
, State captured the javelin throw
a heave of 165 feet, 6 1-6 inches;
shot put went to V. Halsey of
eton with a heave of 44 feet, 11
s, and the discuss throw was
by Bartels of Pennsylvania, his
nee hanz 123 feet.

Silk, Satin, andCFine Lace
Shown in a table of slightly soiled silken undergarments.
Camisoles are trimmed with georgette and filet ,ace.
Camisoles, pink satin, $3.50 value at....... ....$2.49
Crepe dechine-$3.00 value at .......... . 2.49
Chemises-Silk crepe de chine, flesh-
$7.25 to $7.75 value at .............. 5.98
White Silk crepe de chine chemises-
$5.0 values at6. f ."...".".. 4.98
Pink crepe de chine-$5.75 value at .........98
(SECOND FLOOR)

Lot 6 --$3.98
Former value - $4.50, $4.98
GOWNS
Dainty Lace and Rosettes
CHEMISES
Medallions and Lace
Reductions on all higher priced
Garments

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