100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

---'-----

I

PEAKING OF SPORTS

t.h

IS i

ge of Jack Enzer
aseball captain
positions on th
have been wor
th diamoud at Fe
'ast week. Cand
)us positions tur
the first call an
abers more than7

!71 . ByBOB.
Famous Athletes, No. 1-Homer
According to the most reliable sour-
ces, Homer (not Heath), acquired his
'n cognomen by his prowess with the
in bat. In fact, he was the Babe Ruth of
he the Asia Minor circuit (there were no
k- major leagues in the tenth century
B. C.) Many of his greatest hits were
i- way over the heads of the assembled
n- gatherings. He knew how to meet 'er
id with the hexa, or six foot bat, and it'
75 is from this fact that we know him
to have been a man of mighty stature.
Critics have styled his work "swift
.- and smooth flowing." A good base run-
re ner, then. as well as a clean-up man
in with the stick. It is chronicled that
rs he was greeted by the plaudits of the
re multitude in'ever town on the circuit,'
ge showing his popularity and evident
n predominant position in the league.
U- The job he held down in the field is
a not definitely known, but it seems
he probable that he occupied the pitch-
er's box. His well known accuracy
n and subtle twists would qualify him to
g- take the mound against the must ex-
,d perienced sluggers.

ANGELL

It has been suggested that Hughie
Jennings would do well to sign up a
few of Coach Lundgren's Wien. It's
hard to see how Parks or Ruzicka
could do worse work in the box than
some of the Tiger hurlers, while it
looks as though Jack Perrin and Mike
Knode might give a few of the Jung-
aleers a point or two on hitting.
Ed Ruzicka gets the hard luck
medals After reaching the goal of
every pitcher'o ambition-a no hit
game--it certainly was a crime that
he had to lose it.
Only readers who were born in
Boston, Newport, or Northampton.
can render the following properly:

There was...a.,star pitcher, Ruzicka
No ball game was ever uniquer
Than when he gave no
Base-hits to the foe
And lost to a twirler shown weaker.
DE PAUVW PLANS NEW ATH.
LETIC FIELD; TO COST $50,000
Plans are now under way for a new
athletic field at DePauw. Coach Buss
has secured an option on seven and
one-half acres of land bordering on
the -northwest side of the present field,
and it. is planned to put in equipment
costing approximately $50,000.
This field will be completely filled
by two baseball diamonds, one foot-
ball gridiron, a quarter mile track
with a 220 yard straight-away. A ser-
ies of tennis courts will line the sides.
BAOOKLYN AND BOSTON PLAY
RECORD TWENTY-SIX INNINGS
At the end of 26 hard-fought inn-
, ings, the longest game in the history

of baseball was called on account of
darkness, leaving the Boston and
Brooklyn Nationals tied with a score
of 1 to 1. Both teams played the en-
tire game without change of pitchers.
Cadore sticking to the mound for
Brooklyn, and Oeschger for Boston to
the end. Nine hits and two errors
were tallied on each side.
'Other scores for Saturday are:
American League
Boston, 0; New York, 2.
Philadelphia, 9; Washington, 4.
Cleveland, 9; Detroit, 3.
Chicago, 8; St. Louis,. 5.

BSnappy
Beakfast

Service

at

ORE S
Meals Wattles IeCream

National League
New York, 2; Philadelphia, 5.
Brooklyn, 1; Boston, 1.
Cincinnati, 7; Pittsburgh, 1.
St. Louis, 12; Chicago, 4.

.t

i
a $
1

than
of. th

TH. . .
I THE "Y" INN,
I AT LANE HALL

REAL Camping in the REAL Woods
Hunting, Fishing and Canoe Trips
with Indian Guides in the Won-
derful Timagami Country
CALL 652-M AFTER 7:30 P. M.

'

I

has -bee
unary ei
id a goo
re throw
i on di:

I:

U-
m

t: 'first in-
by two pick-
ings of play
Lnity to give
the' squad a

nted at
all sat-
e work.
will be

Kansas
-Spring
ay at tlfe
college:
and 4oss-
ne consti~
of 25 Ag-
o the first

Connie Mack once said that none of
his players who smoked cigarettes
ever reached the top. Are we to in-
fer that the Athletics have alltbeen,
cigarette fiends for the past } five
years?
We do not vouch for the rumor that
the Western State Normal catcher has
two sons graduating from high school
this spring. However, if the boys
have acquired any of their father's
prowess behind the bat and have ab-
sorbed enough good sense to know
that Michigan and not Kazoo is the
place to play baseball, we hope that
the statement is true.
STADIUM BEING BUILT
BY. FA1 WEST SC-HOOL
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON TO
HAVE MANNOTH HOME FOR,
SPORT EVENTS
During the spring vacation the Uni-
versity had the pleasure of entertain-
ing two guests from the University of
Washington. They were Carl F. Gould,
head of the department of architec-
ture in that university, and C. C.
May, an instructor in that depart-
ment, who came to Michigan for 'the
purpose of examining the stadium on
Ferry field.

-4.,. _r
ha y

Home cooked Food
Lunch and Dinner Per Week $5.75
SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER

I

I

Artistic Portraits
Plus Technical Quality

i
I

For satisfactory finishing see
that
SWAIN
gels your films so. leave
them at the Quarry Drug Store
or 713 E. University Ave.

I

u
Studio

r - - ..,.,...,

U

'

121 E. Washingtrn Street

Phone 598

r3
uy what you need ,-no more,-and buy
good dependable merchandise. This will
reduce the H. C. of L. more tha{ any-
thing else.
S PO R T COA TS,

to Indians
1. -- "Lefty"
school pitch-
eveland Amer-
school year in

n op-

ENGRAVING & EMBOSSING
100 cards from old plate.......$2.00
100 cards and new plate, from.....$3.00 up
Place your order now and secure prompt delivery
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS-ARCADE

ed to his
rted where
2 hitters in

i in the past
out not lessi

ame he
years he
10 men.

has
has

bon Men to Try Out
n, Kas., May 1. - Offi-
ad men at Camp Fun-'
ng to try out for posi
ams which will repre-
in the Olympic games
Belgium.) Competitive
eld here in the follow-
t and pistol shooting,
horsemanship, swim-
and track and field

nation contests
e latter part of
counted events
t the cavalry
near here, and
in the other'
.I,

Minn., May 1. -Lew Ten-
ladelphia lightweight, will
West for a' series of.
[p will meet Johnny Till-
neapolis in a 10 round

Work Started
Work has been begun at Washington
on a new stadium, which, it is expect-.
ed, will be ranked among %the finest in
the count'ry. According to Dr..Gould
it will have a seating capacity of more
than 50,000' and the total cost of erec-
tion will be in the neighborhood of
$550,000. Money is'being raised by the
selling of long term seat tickets to'
students, alumni, and citizens. Fifty
dollars buys a seat for two years and
$100 gives the purchaser the privilege.
of attending all 'events for a period of
five years.
"Our..rnew stadium is to be very
much on the order of your own,"
said Dr. Gould. "The chief differ-
ence will lie in the fact that, when
yours is completed the edge toward
the field will be in straight lines,
while ours will be -slightly in the
shape of an oval, thus giving the
spectators the idea of being nearer to
the field when at the far ends of the
stand, or in the section which crosses
one end."
Good 'Site
The stadium will occupy a beautiful
site along the shores of the lake on
which the school is located, landtbe-
ing 'reclaimed to make its construc.-
tion possible. One end is to be left
open, as will -be the case with the
Michigan stadium, and at the end
where seats are built will be erected
two magnificent towers. If -the
plans of the architects are to be be-.
lieved the stadium will undoubtedly
be among the country's greatest.
MISSOURI GRIDMEN TO WEAR
NEW TYPE OF - UNIFORNK
Columbia, Mo., May 1.-When the;
University of Missouri football 4team
takes to the gridiron next fall, it will
be togged in 'a new and distinctive
Tiger uniform. A football outfit, in-
cluding uniforms, to cost approxi-
mately $3,000, has been ordered by W.
E. Meanwell, director of athletics. The
Tiger uniforms will consist of strip-
ed stockings, striped Jersey sleeves:
and a new type of headgear never be-
fore used here.
The Daily's specialty is service to
evervone.-Adv.

is

STUDENTS' LUNCH
409 E. JEFFERSON ST.
Ice Cream and Cold Drinks
Breakfast and Night Lunches
a-Specialty,

i

I

,

i rir J
teSr..-

I

I

WM. R. ME NOLD

SUMMER SESSION 1920

MATERIALS
Flannel & Knitted Fabrics
White Flannel and Whip-
cord Trousers
JUST THE THING FOR
THOSE SPRING PARTIES
A Sport Coat and Extra, Trousers will be
a splendid substitute for a suit and save you
Forty or Fifty Dollars.
TINKER & COMPANY
CLOTHES, FURNISHINGS & HATS
So. State St. at Wiliam St.

PROPRI ETO f

11

U

N OW IS T H E T IM E

I

-:

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

.

to getready
To Mow That Lawn

Grass

and keep it nice and even.

We have the

S-IN
AP EVENT

LAWN MOWERS
to do it with, priced from
$7.00 to .$15.00
for for
common mowers, ball-bearing ones

Iteve Farrell took advantage,
a weather to send his track
ugh a series pf handicap
terday. Freshmen and inel-
ere allowed to compete as
e Varsity men.
iults of the various events'
ollows: 100 yard dash,-first
i by Cook; Hart, second';
Ird. Second race,-won by
Schmitz, second. Third
s by Burke; Meese,'second;
third. Mile -won by Earle;
econd; Lukins, third. Half
by Carson; Douglas, second;
Lird. .120 yard low hurdles-
Lashmet; Spurrier, second;
ird: 440 yard dash-won by

More than 300 courses conducted by a'staff of 260 mem-
bers of the regular faculties: All University facilities avail-
able. Favorable conditions for advanced study.
Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and Arch-
itecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library Methods, Bio-
logical Station, Embalming and Sanitary Science, June 28-
August 2o; Medicine and Surgery, June 28--August 8; Law,
June 21-July 24 and July 26-August 28; Field Courses, in
Geology and Geography in Southern Kentucky, August 30-
September, 25.
Exceptional opportunities for summer study. .The work
s equivalent in method, character, and credit value to that of
the academic session, and is counted towards degrees. Many
special lectures, recitals, concerts, and excursions. Cosmo-
politan student body. Delightful location. Expense low. For
further information' address T. E. RANKIN, Box 30, Ann
Arbor, Michigan. ,

I

U;

SEE OUR

WINDOW DISPLA Y-PICNIC SETS
OR OUTFITS

LARNED

Successor to H. L. Switzer Co.
STATE STREET HARDWARE,

1

Phone 1610.

310 South State Street

p

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan