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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 20

m rro ___., .

t i

4t £Wdiiga BWI
FFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
iblished every morning except Monday
ig the university year by the Board in
rol of Student Publications.
£$ER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ic Associated Press is exclusively entitled
le use for republication of all news dis-
hes credited to it or not otherwise credited
is paper and also the local news pub-
:d herein.
tered at thedpostofrice at Ann Arbor,
Ugan, as Second class matter.
ibscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
fices : Ann Arbor Press Building.
ones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
mmunications not to exceed 300 words,
pied, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
es of events will be published in The
r at the discretion of the Editor, if left
rmailed to the office.
isigned communications will receive no
.deration. No manuscript will be re-
:d unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily does not necessarily endorse the
iments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
ence Roeser..........Managing Editor

CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
10:30 A. M. Public Worship
Cantata: Shelly's "Death and
Life"
Address by Lloyd C. Douglas
Topic: "Renewal of Life"
6:30 P. M. Student Round
Table
Prof. W. R. Humphreys
speaks on
"The Golden Age in Greek
Mythology and in the Bible"
The Guillotine
Editor's note.-Due to the fact that
Kendrick Kimball, Guillotine editor, is
to take charge of the May issue of The
Gargoyle, this column will be suspend-
ed for the time being.
OUR OWN LITTLE REQUIEM
Often our efforts have tired you,
Often our wheezes were old,I
Some of our jokes were moth eaten,
Some hashed o'er and re-told,
So we're thanking you for your pa-
tience
Now that our labors are through,
We know that you suffered, dear
reader, °
So we hand all the credit to you.
We overworked Kipling and others
When we had naught of our own,
We parodied Dr. Tom Lovell,
You read it through with a groan,
And some of our lines were borrowed,
They say that nothing is new,
We know that you suffered, - dear
reader,
So we hand all the credit to you.

I

i On"

First Baptist
Church
10:30 A. M.
EASTIR SERVICE
CANTATA by the Choir

I

Sermon by
M. WELLS

J"

rM. Carey.... ........News
Millar ... ............sCity
nMarx..............Associate
as F, McAllister......Feature
K. Ehlbert......... Telegraph
B. Landis..............Sport
erite Clark...........Women's
is Guernsey ........... Women's

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
FEditor
Editor
Editor

Kimball.......Guillotine
. Osius, Jr...........State]
Shinkman..........Dramatic]
el .... ....... Music
ley ............ Lxchange
1ohl .......Literary

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Eiditor

ISSUE EDITORS

ISSUE EDITORS
t R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
d Sherwood Edgar L. Rice
W. Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson
REPORTERS
s H, Adams John 1a. McManis
d B. Marshall C. H. Murchison
Ellis Mary D. Lane.
a Schermerhorn John I. Dakin
W. Brown Logan Trumbull
erson Swart Stewart Baxter'
Crozier Muriel EZ Bauman

n
ar
e

BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson ........Business Manager
Ages I, Abele .Asst. Business Manager
leran A Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
Win. i. LeFevre....Asst. Business Manager
Wm5 xA. eitzinger.. .Asst. BusinessM anager
Doad .Major... .Asst. Business Manager
Donnell R. Schoffne. Asst. Business Manager
SENIOR STAFF
MarkB Covell Edward Priehs, Jr.
Robert E. McKean Henry Whiting II
george A. Cadwell J, Duane Miller
MaynardAA. Newton R. A.eSullivan
JUNIOR STAFF
Curvt F. Schneider Isabelle Farnum
Harold P Lindsay Geo. R. Striibek, Jr.
Harper Moore Arthur L. Glazier
James A. Kennedy, Jr.
SUNDAY, APRIL 20,. 1919.
EASTER SUNDAY
The first resurrection occurred
nearly two thousand years ago. Since
that -time the world has never failed
to remember the wonderful event, and
its celebration is always looked for-
ward to with affection and reverence.
The war has given us some new ideas
about religion. The boys in the trench-
es were usually not what might be
called religious, yet they have come
from the conflict with a deeper religi-
ous feeling than a whole lifetime of
teaching could have accomplished.
The reason was that the soldier
found that religion could be lived as
well as preached. The first chaplains
to go across tried to preach it, and
they were failures. Then came the
ones who practfeed their religion in
their daily life, who really lived a life
of service and love-and they were
the idols of their companies.
Thus religion itself has had a resur-
rection. We are finding that the only
religion is not that of ritual and form
ality, but that of the real, home-loving
and service-giving kind.
Thus Easter Sunday has a greater
significance this year than ever be
fore.'
DOING THE IMPOSSIBLE
A few years ago a flying machine
was laughed at with good-natured
condescension - it couldn't be done'.
But it was done, and now we are wait-
ing for the first trans-Atlantic flight by
airplane. The airmen are ready, and
are waiting only for favorable weath-
er.
We think of an airplane flying across
the ocean as a feat to be classed with
the greatest in history. In a short
time the flight will have been an ac-
complished fact. Others will follow.
Another generation will think nothing
of, these trips.
Doing the impossible might be call-
ed the motto of our present age. We
are doing it all the time. Inventions
follow one another with startling rap-
idity, until we are bewildered. We
wonder what the next step will be.
We cannot say anything is impos-
sible any more. Because of its in-
conceivability to us, we cannot rej'ct
the future accomplishment of any fact.
What. was deemed impossible to our
forefathers is ridiculed today, and
doubtlessly our apparently advanced
inventions will seem ordinary and even
simple to the coming ages.
The impossible of tomorrow becomes
the possibility of today and the com-'
monplace of yesterday.
A soldier weds the nurse who saved
his life. The question now is, willf
she continue to save?

Our path was not one of roses,
Many a time in despair
We used the slap stick in places
I And christened our work with
prayer,
But we are not asking for glory,
honor to whom it is due,
We know that you suffered, d
reader,
So we hand all the credit to you.

a

ear

"The Jig Is Upg"
"C. B. Carlson died at his home yes-
terday from St. Vitus dance." --
Springfield, Ohio, Gazette.
If switches were all electrical think
how magnetic some women would be.
"Father of Fourteen Seeks Sympa-
thy and Financial Aid."--South Bend,
Ind., Times-News. That's nothing,
George Washington was Father of his
Country and got away with it.
He's a "Liar
It's 1great to be a college bred,
To feel a mental growth,
What kind of a bread is that, you
ask?
It's just a four year loaf.
Handy Quotations, No. 2
"Another cereal story," said the
grocer as he wrote the Quaker Oats
advertisement.
Our Daily Novelette
He--"I called my last girl my Ivory
Soap Queen."
She-"Ah, a delicate tribute to her
purity."
He-"No, she cleaned me out of
everything I had."
The young lady whom we saw
shimmying across the campus one
rainy day last week says that she was
simply dodging the angle worms on
the sidewalk.
FATE
Their meeting it was sudden;
Their meeting it was sad;
She gave her sweet young life,
The most precious thing she had.
She sleeps beneath the williws,
In peace she's resting now;
There's always something doing
When a freight train meets a cow.,
He Wouldn't Lose a Second
When you see a dashing Senior
Blushing scarlet in the face
Every time he pulls his watch out -
There's a woman in the case.
Famous Closing Lines
0. DEATH, WHERE IS THY STING!
LOUIS XVI.
1)iENTII'(ATION OF WORMS
TO BE MADE BY PROF. WELCH
Two collections of annelid worms
from the Arctic regions have been re-
ceived by Prof. Paul S. Welch, of the
zoology department, for identification.
One of these collections was made
by the Canadian Arctic expedition,
which was under the leadership of!
Vilhjalmur Stefansson. It consists of
more than 100 specimens representing
seven different species, two of whichl
are new. These animals are distant
relatives of the well-known earthworn
and live in the ground and in the moss.
They were collected along the north-
ern shore of Canada in the region ly-
ing between Icy cape and Coronation
gulf. The second collection was made
in Northern Greenland by the Crocker-
land expedition, but the identifications
have not as yet been made.

HOPE
1 12:00 P. M.
EASTER PROGRAM
By the Sunday School
6:30 P. X.
Guild Meeting
.F. B. Igler will speak
TELLS OFCHAPEONES
CHANGE OF ATTITUDE OF STU-
DENTS GIVEN AS REMEDY FOR
SITUATI ON, SAYS WRITER.
Editor, The Michigan Daily.
It may not be generally known, but
it is nevertheless true that those in
charge of our University dances are
finding it increasingly difficult to se-
cure chaperones. If chaperones are
necessary, and it seems that they are
so considered (at one time several of
our leading University organizations
for women boycotted what was then
Granger's dancing academy, because
no chaperones were invited), the sub-
ject may well merit consideration. A
little discussion among those who have
been serving in this capacity will read-
ily reveal the cause for tis condi-
tion, and it is as one who is earnestly
interested in the welfare of the dance
as a student amusement that the writ-
er submits this statement.
The chaperone takes the attitude
that he is present not as a policeman,
an idea which comes from far back in
the woods, but rather as an evidence
of the sanction of the University au-
thorities, of their sympathy; and he
feels that, since he is conferring a
favor, he should be given some passing
consideration by the dancers and not
be ignored, as is almost always the
case even when a dozen of the dancers
on the floor may be his own students.
The chaperon:feels also that the stu-
dent is neglecting a valuable oppor-
tunity when he fails to take a few mo-
ments to speak to the chaperones be-
tween dances, an opportunity to ac-
quire that social poise which is as-
suredly not out of keeping with the
young man or woman who 'goes out
from the University calling himself
educated.
It is known that the heads of our
University housing organizationshave
long tried to instill in their students
a proper sense of their responsibil-
ity in this respect, but with little ef-
fect. The dance committees also are
as " a rule most satisfactory in their
function, but again with little if any
effect on the dancers. Meanwhile,
among those who have frequently
served in the past as chaperones one
often hears the remark, "I don't care
to chaperone any more; I don't care to
go anywhere where my presence is
ignored, if not resented." Let there
be a marked change, however, in this
~g
*- U
iii
-ll,
$159
* B
SProtect Your
C Prc Floors
Q Porch floors and steps
receive harder wear than
5 any other czizface about m
M the house.
Low1o.heys'
]PfQCH I
FLOR Ur

will ? eep them lockin ~ '
* well aLd prce' them y
against. wcathe:: an
wear.
a S'Ad recady for use-in &;
cans of convenient size.
Ask far clc; cUaxd
f OSWALD A. HERZ
112 W. Washington St.-,
IK fl""

FIRST
METHODIST CHURCH
EASTER SERVICES
Sunrise Meeting
at 8;00 o'clock
"Father" Iden
10:30 o'clock
Cantata: "The Resurrection"
Grace Johnson Konold, assisted
by quartette and chorus
At Noon
Prof. J. C. Parker
"My Portrait of Jesus Christ"
Young Men's Class
6:30 o'clock
Roy C. Jacobson
"The New Resurrection"
7:30 o'clock
Prof. T. C. Trueblood
Readings from
"The Passion Play"
STUDENTS WELCOME

I

I

attitude of our student dancers, and
the obtaining of chaperones will furn-
ish no difficulty whatever to those in
charge, whose patience is now all but
exhausted.
A CHAPERONE.
Junior girls may settle their ac-
counts with the Junior Play committee
from 10 to 12 o'clock Monday morning
in University hall. This will be the
only chance for arranging this mat-
ter.
Miss Marion 'Wood wishes to inter-
view all junior and senior girls who
intend to play baseball, at 4 o'clock
Monday afternoon in Barbour gymnas-
ium. The purpose of this meeting is
to arrange practice schedules.
A meeting of the social service com-
mittee will be held at 4 o'clock Mon-
day afternoon in Barbour gymnas-
ium.
Pledges for Y. W. C. A. work in
China should be paid to Miss Huldah
Bancroft in Barbour gymnasium.
Tennis balls and rackets. Cushing's
Pharmamy.-Adv.
Rent a Kodak today. Lyndon, 719
N. University Ave.-Adv. .
Patronize our aavertisers.--Adv.

At Our Big Neckwear Values
at Seventy-five cents

1, rl

Can

You Beat It?

Wadhams & Co.,

Tennis Players Listen
We are at your service with
100 TENNIS RACKETS
Wright and Ditson5's Strong line, also H. C. Lee
& Co.'s "Slotted Throat" Racket
Special attention to Restringing. Peefect work
and prompt delivery guaranteed.

STATE STREET STORE

.

WuAHR'S

McGregor Golf Clubs
Lee, Wright & Detson and Spaulding
Rackets

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

When passing through
the Arcade

Tennis Balls

Rackets Restrung

LOOK!

GRAHAM! formerly, Sheehan & Co.[

LYNDON, 719 N.
Eastman Films.
4:30 P. M.-Adv.

University for fresh
Open Sunday until

I.

THE RAINY
SEASON IS HERE
WITH
YOU

Relieving

You of, a

Task

Call Us

In cleaning household articles, home methods

A Trial Solicited
INDEPENDENT

never get them thoroughly clean.

Beating and shak-

ing will get some of the dust and germs out-it will
also destroy the finer textures. Send the draperies,
hangings and coverings to us and we will return them

TAXI CO.

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to you

Cleaned carefully--the dust
and stains removed and the
colorings made fresher.

1.1

Shorthand
Typewriting'
Bookkeeping

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

The cost is little-besides you save all the labor
and gain the satisfaction of having your home things
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Exclusive
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Cleaning

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IRepairing

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--8:1o a.
in., and hourly to 8:10 p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. n., and every hour to 9:48 p. M. (Ex-
dresses"^ake local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. in., 9:o5 a.
n. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. in., 10:50
p. in. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. in., 12:20
a. in., 1:to a. n1., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11 :20 p. in.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. M. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R
314 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnnArbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $50,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

Parcel Post Packages Paid One Way

209 S. 4TH AVE

Phone 2508

ANN ARBOR

I

SAVE THE PIECES!
Eye Glass Lenses Ground in Our Own Shop. Same Day. Try Our Service.
Eyes Examined
STATE STREET
HALLER FULLER JEWELERS

tne is real Hungary chief."-
te. He can starve for all we

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