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April 20, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-20

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TIHL WEATHER
CLOUDY; POSSIBLY
RAIN

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SEBVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 138.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENT!

PRIE TREE--N

ANNOUCE FINAL
PLANSFOR LST
SENIOR ACTIITY
APRIL 22 TO SEE ALL LAST YEAR
MEN AND WOMEN IN
PROCESSION
LUNDQUIST IN CHARGE
OF PROGRAM OF DAY,
Swing-out to Move from Starting
Point Promptly at 4 O'clock, to
University Hall
,Seniors of all classes will swing out
on Tuesday afternoon, April, 22.
Laurel Lundquist, president of the
senior lits, will act as master of cer-
emonies at the swing-out. Seniors of
the different classes will assemble in
their caps and gowns a few minutes
before 4 o'clock in the following or-
der.
Order of Formation
Literary students and foresters will
form on the walk between University
hall and the museum. Engineers and
architects are to assemble on the walk
between University hall and the flag
pole. The laws, the pharmics, the
homeops, the dents and the graduate
students will form in line on the walk
between University hall and the Law
building.
The procession of seniors thus form-
ed will move into University hall
promptly at 4 o'clock. The program
of the swing-out exercises will be
opened by an invocation by the Rev.
Lloyd C. Douglas. A solo will fol-
low. President Hutchins will deliver
the address followed by Varsity, sung
by all of the seniors, under the direc-
tion of M. Harrison of the School of
Music. Rev. Douglas will close the
program with a benediction.
Will Form Block M
After the exercises the seniors will
go out of :University hall through the
front doors and will form the tradi-
tional block M on the campus, in pro-
cession. The band will play while
the seniors are marching into Uni-
versity hall and while the M is be-
ing formed.
In case of rain the assembly will
take place within the corridors of Uni-
versity hall rather than on the ad-
joining walks.
200 Atrend Last
frixer Of Season
In spite of the call of the boule-
vard, the ball game, the psychic won-
der at one of the local theaters, the
Women's league mixer persevered and
had an attendance of more than 200
yesterday afternoon in Barbour gym-1
nasium.
For the first time in the history of
this year's mixers it cannot be said
that the guests departed from the af-
fair with sore and imposed on feet.f
The fact of the matter is that the
floor offered such ample space thatl
the dancers did not have to resort tof
the usual "treat 'em rough" philoso-
phy which has been used so extensive-
ly by the tank corps in a recent war
Strict formality was adhered to and
the committee was kept busy intro-l
ducing men to "that girl over there."
Misses Wood and Marion Dawley, Mrs.f
Lombard and Mrs. Wallace acted as
chaperones.t
This was the last All-campus mixer1
to be given by the Women's leagueI
this year.

MICHIGAN MAN APPOINTED
TO PROFESSORSHIP IN FRANCE t
Captain William Hiller, '16, of Annt
Arbor, has been appointed instructor
in mathematics in the American uni-
versity at Beaume, France. Captainr
Hilder recently returned to France t
from Italy, where he has been serv-
ing during the past two years, with I
the exception of a few months in this
country last fall.
RED CROSS SUPPLIES 655
MEN WITH NOTARY SERVICES
Not only has the civilian population
been benefited by the wok of thed 1-
cal Red Cross, but soldiers and dis-
charged men have been equally serv-'
er. Registration shows 655 men to
have been supplied with notary serv-
ices and government legal blanks. t
_ _ __ -t
Rugs to Be Exhibited Hereo
A rare collection of oriental rugs, i
which have aroused great interest
during their exhibition in Detroit, will b
be shown in Ann Arbor from April 23 v
to 26 in the Michigan Union.-

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
London, April 19. - A retirement
along virtually all of the front in
Eastern Russia is admitted by the
Soviet government in a wireless mess-
age dated April 16 and received here
today.
Copenhagen, April 19.-Preparations
are being made in Germany for a
plebiscite on the question of rejecting
the peace terms offered to Germany
if such rejection is considered nces-
sary, according to the Cologne Ga-
zette.
New York. April 19.-The threaten-
ed tie-up of the port of New York
was averted today after the marine
workersappealed to by Mayor Hy-
land agreed to return to work on a
10-hour basis and submit the ques-
tion of wages to arbitration.
HALF MILE RELAY
WON BYMICHIGAN
Chicago Wins Championship With S
Points; Maroons Lose
in Mile
JOHNSON HAS BACK LUCK IN 100;
WON, BY HOYT OF GRINNELL
Des Moines, Ia., April. 19.-Upset-
ting all predictions of the past two
weeks; Michigan's half mile relay
team swept to a sensational victory
in the University division at the Drake
relays Saturday.
University of Chicago, with a first
and second, for 8 points, won the
championship. The Maroon runners
took first in the four mile university
race and second in the two mile race,
which was won by Notre Dame. Mich-
igan, Illinois, and Notre Dame tied in
the meet for second place with five
points each. Missouri University was
third with tirce counters.
Win Fastest Event
The race won by Michigan was the
fastest evea on the card, four men,
Meese, Butler, Losch, and Johnson
running the distance in 1 minute, 29
and 4-5 seconds, only 1 second slow-
er than the record for the race set by
Wisconsin in 1916.
Carl Johnson, the favorite in the 100
yard dash encountered some difficulty
in getting away and crossed the line
in fourth place. The Michigan star
has experienced trouble in running on
the cinder path this year and could not
equal hii former performances. The
mile team entered by Michigan took
fifth in that race, in a field of eight
starters.
Chicago was the favorite for the one
and two mile relays but did not come
through in either. Stagg's runners got
a second in the two mile event and
failed to place in the mile, which went
to Nebraska.
Summary
Special 100 yard dash-First, Hoyt,
Grinnell; second, Butler, Dubuc;
third, Hayes, Notre Dame; fourth,
Johnson, Michigan. Time 10 1-5 sec-
onds.
One mile college-Won by Wabash;
Coe, second; Hamline, third; Parsons,
fourth. Time 3:33-4-5.
Two mile university-Won by Notre
Dame; Chicago, second; Illinois,
third; Wisconsin, fourth. Time 8.02.
Two mile college-Won by Morning-
side; Cornell, second; Coe, third;
Simpson, fourth. Time 8:23 3-5.
Half mile university-Missouri Val-'
ley section-Won by Grinnell; Kan-
sas, second; Nebraska, third; Drake,
fourth. Time 1:31.
Half mile university-Big Ten sec-
tion-Won by Michigan, (Meese, But-
ler, Losch, Johnson) ; Illinois, second;
Iowa, third; Minnesota, fourth. Time
1:29 4-5.
Four mile university-Won by Chi-'
cago; Iowa State, second; Drake,
third. Time 18:56 3-5.

Half mile college-Won by Dubuc;
Coe, second; South Dakota, third.
Simpson, fourth. Time 1:34 2-5.
One mile university-Won by Neb-
raska; Missouri, second; Kansas,
third; Grinnell, fourth. Time 3:26.
LIEUT. HENRY TIBBS RE-
TURNS FROM ACTIVE SERVICE
Although Over Draft Age, and Married,
He Enlisted for Service at
Outbreak of War
Litut. Henry Tibbs has just re-
turned home from active service in
France, and s now awaiting his dis-
charge.
Although married, over the draft
age, and holding an important posi-
tion in the business world of De-
;roit, Lieutenant Tibbs enlisted at the
outbreak of hostilities, and after pass-
ng through the schools of Fortress
Monroe, and Fort Williams, received
his commission in field artillery, and
was sent across with the 72nd regi-
ment.

YANK ACE COMING
HERE TO TELL OF
FIGHTS IN MID-AIR
CAPTAIN EDDIE RICKENBACKER
SCHEDULED TO TALK AT HILL
AUDITORIUM
FORMER SPEED KING
WEARS TWO CROSSES
Acredited With 69 Unofficial Victories
Over German Planes; Member of
Legion of Honor
Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker, American
ace of aces and commander of the
famous 94th aero squadron, and Am-
erica's greatest hero of the war, will
speak Saturday evening, May 3, at
Hill auditorium.
Captain Rickenbacker formerly idol
of the speedways, Pershing's chauffer,
and winner of 26 official victories over
the Huns in the air, will tell local peo-
ple of his thrilling adventures in the
air.
Will Tell of First Victory
Included in these stories will be
those of his first victory in the air, of
his fights against great odds, stories
of his friends who fell in battle, among
them the world's greatest air fighters,
and of his aerial view of the battle of
Belleau wood.
The ace, honored with the Croix de
Guerre, the Distinguished Service
Cross, with Palms, and membership in
the Legion of Honor, and with 69 un-
official victories to his credit, is said
to be one of the most modest heroes
America ever had. Captain Ricken-
backer insists on giving his title of
ace of aces to the heroes of Belleau
who he saw "lick Germany's best,
The Prussian Guards." He has said on
several occasions that he medals he
wears should have been given to the
air fighters who have made the su-
preme sacrifice.
Is Modest Hero
Rickenbacker has won the hearts of
many of his audiences since his re-
turn by his modesty in telling of his
own deeds and by the generous praise
which he heaps upon his fallen com-
rades.
Tickets for the lecture will go on
sale at once at Wahr's and Sheehan's.
The prices are $1.50, $1.00, and 50
cents.
ENGINEERS Will TEST
BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION
HIGHWAY LABORATORY TO TRY
EXPERIMENT NEVER AT-
TEMTED BEFORE
Unproven theories in the line of re-
infoirced concrete bridge construction
are soon to be tested by the Highway
laboratory of the civil engineering de-
partment in an experiment, such as
has never before been attempted. If
successful an enormous annual sav-
ing in the cost of bridge construction,
will be made possible.
Test to Support Weights
To conduct the test a full sized
bridge slab, 16 feet square and care-
fully constructed of reinforced con-
crete was prepared about a year ago
and has since been left to season.
The slab has now been supported by
five 12-inch "I" beams and prepara-
tions will soon be complete for the
test.
With the purpose in view of de-
termining whether or not such a type
of construction will support the great-
est possible weight that it might be;
subjected to, a highway bridge press-
ure of 18 tons will be applied by a
hydraulic press. This is estimated as
a weight equal to the heaviest road

roller., If the experiment proves a
success bridges of this type will un-
(Continued on Page Six)
Boston Wins Double Header
Boston , April 19. - The major
league baseball season was opened
here today when the Brooklyn team
defeated Boston 5 to 2 in a 10 inning
game this morning and 3 to 2 this
afternoon.

Cantatas And iusic Celebrate ,
Resurrection Of ,Jesus Christ
Appropriate services, with special der the direction of Grace Johnson
music, have been arranged in all of ( Konald, who will be assisted by Pansy
the churches of Ann Arbor for today. E. Johnson, Paul Wilson, Edgerton
Williams, and a chorus of 20 voices.
First among these will be the sun- Leonard Brooks will be at2the or-
rise service to be held at 6:15 o'clock: gan, with Mr. Bronson as violinist.
at the first bend of the boulevard be- Under the direction of Prof. Earl
low Geddes avenue. V. Moore, the choir of the Congrega-
Music for this service will be furn- tional church which rendered "The
ished by members of the University Crucifixion" on Friday, will present
Girls' Glee club and the Freshmen Shelley's cantata, "Life and Death," at
Glee club of Martha Cook dormitory. the morning service.
After a short talk by the Rev. Lloyd Bible School Has Program
ed. In case of rain, the service will ley Bucktoi ofthepCrsened atteDud
not be held. .morning service of the First Baptist
Cantatas and Special Music church. Members of the Bible school
Special cantatas will be giten dur- will give, a specially prepared Easter
ing the day at some of the churches, program at the noon hour in the par-
while in others the music will con- lors of the church.
sist of various Easter selections pre- Particularly appropriate to the Eas-
sented either in solo or quartet. ter season will be the reading of se-
Bullard's Easter cantata, "The Res- -lections from the Passion play by
urrection," will be sung at the Meth- Prof. T. C. Trueblood of the oratori-
odist Episcopal Morning service at cal department at the Methodist
10:30 o'clock. The choir will be un- church evening service.
PHI SIGMA PICKS WOLVERINES WIN
14 NEW MEMBER5S FIRST GAME 10-0

Biological Honorary Society
Eleven Men to Active
Membership

ElectsI

INITIATION TO BE HELD IN
MAY, EXACT DATE NOT SET
Phi Sigma, national honorary bio-
logical society, elected the following
to membership at its last meeting:
Dr. L. L. Bottsford, professor of
gynecology and of obstetrics; Dr. P.
0. Okkelberg, assistant professor of
zoology; and Dr. F. C. Gates, acting
assistant professor of botany.
To active membership:
A. I. Ortenberger, '20, J. Van Oos-
ten, grad, T. H. Hubbell, '20, L. J.
Gariepy, '22M, U. R. Torgerson, '20M,
J. W. Helfrich, '21M, A. Kirchner, '20M,
L. G. Herrmann, '21, E. H. Brunquist,
graduate and assistant in bacteriology,
J. P. Parsons, '19M, and R. E. Spok-
en, '19P.
Although the date on which the in-
itiation and banquet will take place
has not yet been definitely decided, it
will occur some time in May.
Sciuridae Family
Forsakes Campus
There used to be a time a few years
back, according to those who know,
when certain people, politely termed
eccentric, would think twice before
setting out alone on a trip across the
campus. But nowadays circumstances
have changed. "Peculiar" persons no
longer skirt warily clumps of trees
that look as if they might be inhab-
ited by hungry members of the "sci-
uridae" family. -
For a squirrel on the camnus of the
University of Michigan is almost as.
rare a sight as a bear or moose. Where
all the little animals have gone no
one seems to know, and very few solu-
tions are offered.
Mr. Edward C. Pardon, superinten-
dent of buildings and grounds, hesi-
tated about giving an opinion as to,
the whereabouts of the squirrels but
asserted that his department had done
nothing to discourage the little ani-
mals from making the campus their
home.
Prof. Peter O. Okkelberg of the Zoo-,
logy department ventured the sugges-
tion that perhaps townspeople had
done their best to get rid of the squir-
rels in spite of the fact that the an-
imals are protected by law, because
they make so much trouble in gar-
dens.
The logical solution seems to be that
the bushy-tailed fellows have merely
transferred their activities to the out-
skirts of town where life in general is
more quiet and restful.

Case Proves No Match for Lundgren's
Championship Calibre Base.
ball Men
AVERAGE ONE RUN AN INNING
WITH EXTRA COUNTER AT END
Case was no match for the Univer-
sity of Michigan baseball team, in
the game between the two schools at
Ferry field Saturday, and was out-
played in every phase of the game,
losing 10-0.
The visitors did not get a hit until
the last inning, when Tichey, pitcher,
managed to connect with one of Rube
Schidler's deliveries. After Tichey, in
the same inning, Seheidler drove out
a clean one for two bases. Other than
this the game was all one sided and
only three visitors reachedsecond base
and one third.
The pitching of the Wolverines slab
artists was the finest thing about the
game. Parks started in the box and
struck out the first three men. Be-
fore he gave way to Glenn in the
fourth inning he had made six Cleve-
landers fan the air.
Glenn in Rare Form
Glenn also was in rare form and
his cross fire delivery had the Case
players guessing most of the time.
He struck out four in the three inn-
ings he pitched and allowed only one
man to get past first.
Scheider, who finished the game,
excepting in the final inning, had
everything his own way. Although
the Case outfit does not carry an ex-
traordinary string of hitters, it would
appear as if Michigan is going to
-have even a better pitching staff than
didthe champonshp aggregaton of
last spring.
The hitting was not of the best al-
though 10 bingles were collected.
These were scattered nearly evenly
through the whole team, only Knode
and Cooper getting two apiece. Coop-
er had to withdraw from the game
in the fifth inning as he was hit by a
ball thrown to catch him at the
plate.
Van Boven Scores First
The first run came in the second
inning. Van Boven was hit by the
Case pitcher. He went to second when
Karpus rolled a slow one down the
first baseline. Van Boven scored on
;Parks' two base hit. Two hits in the
'next time at bat resulted in another
run, and a walk. A hit and an error
by the Cleevland shortstop made the
third tally in as many innings run-
ning.
No more scores came until Tichey
replaced Vanderhoff on the mound for
the losers in the seventh. The Case
team seemed to blow up and Michi-
gan batted around scoring five runs,
only one of them earned. Three hits
and three errors, 'two of these bun-
gled by the visitors' airy little short-
stop, allowed Froemke, Pheney, Bow-
erman, Huber, and Van Boven to ring
up counters.
Heath Replaces Tichey
The final two scores were made in
the next inning. Tichey, the unfor-
tunate, was replaced by Heath. Heath
started out by fanning Bowerman and
it appeared as though there would be
little more scoring by Michigan. How-
ever, Van Boven then walked and Kar-
pus followed driving out his only hit
of the game. Huber also got on when
Karpus was thrown out at second.
Scheidler brought in bothmen with a
long safety.
Van Boven was the heavy scorer of
the afternoon, crossing the plate three
times, although he did not make a sin-
gle hit. He was hit by the pitcher,
walked twice and reached first safely
a fourth time through a fielder's

FA9CUT-STUDENT
COMMITTEE MAES
FIFTH LON PLAN
REGISTRAR HALL'S OFFICE MADE
HEADQUARTERS OF DRIVE
IN UNIVERSITY
EXTENSIVE CAMPAIGNS
PLANNED FOR CAMPUS
Class Presidents Form Sub-Committee
to Canvass Class Members; Name
Assistants Later
Tentative plans for raising funds
in the University for the Fifth Victory
loan were formulated Saturday morn-
ing at a joint meeting of the faculty
and student committees in Registrar
Hall's office.
Arrangements have been made by
which students may sign for bonds at
the student committee's headquarters
in Registrar Hall' office. The stu-
dents should buy their bonds here and
not at the city headquarters.
There will be three days, Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday of next week,
in which all should volunteer with
their subscriptions. If sufficient money
is not raised in this time, it is prob-
able that a house to house canvass
will be made.
Campaign Planned
Plans are being made by the cen-
tral committee to wage an extensive
campaign. Posters have been placed
at conspicuous places on the campus,
so that the importance of the drive
may be impressed -upon the people.
Talks will be given by various men
and women in the fraternity and soror-
ity houses.
Because of the heavy work which
lies before the committee, the plan of
work has been enlarged. Several per-
sons have been added to the central
committee, which now includes: Ralph
E. Gault, '21L, president of the stu-
dent council, D. M. Springer, '19,
president of the Union, Doris McDon-
ald, '19, president of the Women's
league, Marguerite Chapin, '20, pres-
ident-elect of the Women's league,
Emily Loman, '19, president of the Y.
W. C. A., Clarence Roeser, '19, man-
aging editor of The Daily, Albert Lund-
quist, '19, president of the senior lit
class, and S. W. Sedgwick, '19, cap-
tain of the track team. There will be
a meeting of this committee at 8
o'clock Sunday in the registrar's of-
fice.
Sub-Committees Named
A sub-committe, composed of all the
class presidents, who will appoint
eight to 10 active workers to act as
canvassers to get people to sign for
bonds at the Student Committee's
headquarters, has bon appointed to'
assist in the work. These people will
be notified by phone in order that they
may at once begin work.
(Continued onpage six)
Yank Flies rom
Chicago To N. Y.
(By Associated Press)
Mineola, N. Y., April 19. - Flying
at an average speed at 106.38 miles an
hour for six hours and 50 minutes,
Capt. E. F. White, an army aviator,
completed the first non-stop flight be-
tween Chicago and New York at 5:40
o'clock this afternoon, landing at Haz-
elhurst field.
The distance covered was 727
miles. Captain White said the trip
was without incident.
St. Johns, Newfoundland, April 19.-
Capt. Frederick P. Raynham, British
aviator competing with Harry G.
Hawker, Australian, for the $50,000
prize offered by the London Daily Mail
for the first flyer to cross the Atlan-
tic, announced late today that he

would make every effort to "hop off"
tomorrow as he had laid a wager that
he would be in England Easter Mon-
day.
London, April 19.-The keenest dis-
appointment is felt in Great Britain
at the failure of Major J. C. P. Wood
to reach Ireland, whence he intended
to attempt a flight across the Atlan-
tic because it had been hoped here
that an airman starting from this side
would be the first to accomplish the
feat. It is believed certain that Major
Wood's departure must be delayed
greatly, for, even if his machine can
be salvaged, it will take a long while
to get it tuned up again. There have
been conflicting reports as to how se-
riously the machine is damaged, if
at all.

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister

Easter Services:

10:30 A. M. and 7:30 P. M.

Young People's Evening Service 6:30
Music at Evening Service by University Girl's Glee Club and
Freshman Girl's Glee Club

Returns from Philippines for.Visit
I Mrs. David C. Johnson, '14, has jus
returned from the Philippine Island
for a month's visit with her mothe:
Mrs. F. W. Bigalke of 715 Have
street of this city.

choice.

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