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January 17, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-17

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THE WEATHER
COOL AND CLOUDY
T$)DAY

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AaitM,

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND N IGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 78. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

PROHIBITION WINS
AT I 0AL VICTORY,
NEBRA11SKA VOTE
UNITED STATES TODAY BECOMES
FIRST GREAT NATION WITH-
OUT LIQUOR TRAFFIC
AMENDMENT TAKES
EFFECT JAN. 16, 1920
Measure Produces Minimum of Un-
employment; Brewers for
Other Fields
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 16. - Ratification
today of the federal constitutional
prohibition amendment made the
United States the first great power to
take legislative action to permanently
check liquor traffic.
Nebraska's vote gave the necessary
three-fourths majority, to make effec-
tive the amendment submitted by
congress in December, 1917. It was
affirmed by similar action in the leg-
islatures of Missouri and Wyoming,
making 38 states in all which have
approved of a "dry" America. Affirm-
ative actions by some of the 10 state
legislatures yet to act is predicted by
prohibition advocates.
War Speeds Action
Under the terms of the amendment,
manufacture, sale and importation of
intoxicating liquors must cease one
year after ratification, but prohibition
will be a fact in every state much
earlier because, of 'the war measure
forbidding the manufacturing and
sale of alcoholic beverages after June
30 until the demobilization of the
military forces is completed. Under
the war time measures, exportation
of'liquor is permitted, but the great
stocks now held in large warehouses
will have to be disposed of before the
federal amendment becomes effective.
Discussion as to whether the new
amendment beconies a part of the
constitution, now that 36 states have
ratified it, or whether it becomes a
part of the basic law only when each
state has certified its action to the
secretary of state, led today to a
search of records which showed that
the only true amendments ratified in
the last century, providing for income
taxes and direct election of senators,
were considered effective immediately
after 36 states lead taken affirmative
action.
Internal Revenue Loses
Senator Sheppeard authorizing the
amendment said that the federal pro-
hibition becomes a national fact Jan.
16, 1920. Only 14 of the states have
certified the action to the state de-
partment.
Two problems of government are
raised by prospective stockers of the
manufacture and sale of intoxicating
liquors as hundreds of millions of
dollars derived from internal revenue
wll have to be obtained from other
sources. Now the amendment also
will have to be passed and enforce-
ment made by congress.
Only a minimum of unemployment
is expected to result as the cumula-
tive security of successive restrictive
measures adopted since the war be-
gan, due to the fact that already many
distillers and brewers have sought
other uses for their plants. Hundreds
of millions of dollars are invested in
distilleries and breweries. .
Half of Nation Already Dry

More than half of the territory in
the United States already is dry
through state action or local option.
Western and .southern states took
the lead in prohibition. In the west
only California, Nevada and Wyoming
still permit the sale of liquors, and
only Louisiana in the south. The only
remaining wet states form a belt
through the Mississippi and Ohio val-
leys.,
SOPH LITS HOLD UP PLANS
FOR PROM; HAVE NO PRESIDENT
Lack of a soph lit president is hold-
ing up the formation of plans for a
soph prom. Plans are underway for a
meeting of the soph lits to elect a new
president and appoint a prom comi-
mittee to co-operate with the one the,
soph engineers have elected.
The meeting will be held tomorrow

Old Timers"ell
Frosh Traditions
If all the freshman engineers live
up to the traditions that were ex-
pounded to them at their meeting held
yesterday in the Natural Science aud-
itorium, they should be model
"frosh."
The first speaker was Dean William
H. Butts, who spent a few moments
explaining how Michigan stood as an
engineering college. D. Knight Mir-
rielees, '20M, told what traditions the
freshmen should respect and gave a
clever talk full of good advice. Will
C. Babbitt, '19E, brought the Engineer-
ing society and the Technic before the
minds of the freshman and was fol-
lowed by C. T. Van Dusen, '19E, who
told what the honor system meant in
the engineering department.
When put up to a vote, it was unan-
imously decided that this freshman
class would abide by the rules of
this system. Two members, Bruce
Van Dusen and George Darling, were
appointed as representatives to the
Student Honor council.
Czysz was elected as athletic man-
ager. Claude Van Patten, the presi-
dent, announced the following social
committee: E. Harbeck, chairman,
Russell S. Persing and Dean Eiler-
thorpe.
CONGRESS FREES
LA FOLLETTE CASE
Washington, Jan. 16. By a vote of
50 to 21 the senate today adopted a
resolution recommended by a majority
of the privileges and elections com-
mittee dismissing disloyalty charges
brought against Senator La Follette,
of Wisconsin, by the Minnesota safe-
ty commission, because of his speech
on the war delivered before the non-
partisan league of St. Paul, Sept. 20,
1917. The resolution said that the
speech did not justify any action by
the senate.
Smith Against Resolution
On the vote which was considered
by severe arraignment of Senator La
Follette by Senator Willim' of Mis-
sissippi, 23 Republican senators and
17 Democrats reported the resolution,
while 20 Democrats and one Republi-
can, Senator Smith, of Michigan, voted
against it. Amongst those voting the
affirmative was Senator Martin, the
Democratic leader, Senator Lodge, the
Republican leader, and the two Min-
nesota senators, Kellogg and Nelson.
Those opposing their resolution
were Chairman Pomerene, of the priv-
aleges and elections committee, and
Senator Salisbury, of Delaware, pres-
ident pro tem of the senate.
Senator La Follette Calms
The senate disposes of not only the
Minnesota state commission's pro-
ceedings, which have "been going on
for more than a year, but excuses the
letters asking for Senator La Fol-
lette's expulsion.
The resolution was adopted with lit-
tle debate. During most of the pro-
ceedings Senator La Follette occupied
his seat at the front of the center
aisle, chewing a cigar and with face
sternly set.
NOTED WAR WORKER
GUEST AT NEWBERRY
Miss Helen Fraser, thewell known
war worker who speaks tonight at 8
o'clock in the auditorium of the Nat-
ural Science building, will be the
guest of Newberry residence while in
Ann Arbor. Miss Fraser, here under
the auspices of the Women's league,

will speak on "Reconstruction," a
subject of interest to men as well as
to women.
Women's war work and reconstruc-
tion work in industries as well as
among the fighting forces will be dis-
cssed by Miss Fraser, who has ac-
comIpdished much along this line. She
recently returned from the American
lines in France and has seen the work
of American, French and English
women bEhind the trenches. On her
return to America she was received
at the White Ilouse as the first offi-
cial British woman tro come to this
country to tell of the efforts of wom-
en in war work.
ame California Park for Roosevelt
s Washington, Jan. 16.-The bill des-
ignating the California Giant Red-
wood district as "Rosevelt National
Park" was passed unanimously to-
day by the Senate and now goes to

AIMPUS MASS MEETING TO
RING BACK PRE-WAR PEP
STUDENT COUNCIL RECOMMENDS
CLASS DUES PAID IN
BLANKET FEE
College spirit!
What it is, what part it has played
in making the University, how to
bring back before the war pep. Its im-
portance, and a living history of its
past, present, and future conditions
will be discussed by faculty, alumni,
and student representatives at an all
campus meeting in Hill auditorium
Friday evening, Jan. 24.
C. L. Roeser Chosen Chairman
This was decided, and as many de-
tails as possible were arranged, at
last night's meeting of the student
council. Clarence Roeser, '19, has
ben appointed chairman of the mass
meeting. The various speakers for the
event will be announced later by
Chairman Roeser.
Entrance Fee to Cover Dues
A motion was passed by the coun-
cil that all students at the beginning
of each school year pay to the Uni-
versity treasurer over and above their
entrance fees the $1 class dues. The
treasurer is to turn the money over
to the student council, who will keep
it in trust for the various class treas-
urers. This last move is up to the
discretion of the Board of Regents.

FRENCH SOLDIER ORGANIST
AGAIN TO PPEAR HERE

11 Boilermakers
Pound out Chorus

Eleven initiates hammered in anvil
REPEAT SUCCESS chorus near the arch Thursday aft-

IRETURNS

TO

OF LAST YEAR'S MAY
FESTIVAL

OLD ROMAN FORUM
TOLD IN PICTURE
"It cannot fail to give one a thrill
to consider .,as he walks through the
ruins of the Roman forum, that he is
treading the ground trod by Augustus
and by Julius Caesar, and that these
same walls which surround him re-
sounded to the eloquence of Cicero,"
said Assistant Prof. A. R. Crittenden
of the Latin department in his lec-
ture on "The Roman Fqrum" at the
meeting of the Classical club last
night.
Professor Crittenden showed a'
number of interesting and instructive
lantern slides which gave the audi-
ence a good conception of the Ro-
man Forum as it was and is at pres-
ent. He showed slides which illus-
trated the forum before it was ex-
cavated at all and at the time when
it was used for a pasturing ground
for the cattle of the people of the
middle ages. Other slides showed the
forum as it was before the excava-
tions of 1898-1902 were made, and
finally the slides showed the forum
as the picturesque and inspiring ruin
that it is today.
The excavations have been made
to a depth of between 20 and 40 feet.
"In many places," he said, "the mod-
ern city of Rome towers 30 feet above
the base of the forum." His slides
showed the burial grounds of ancient
Rome, the business places, the tem-
ples and the rostra from which the
ramous speeches of antiquity were de-
livered.
An interesting feature of his lec-
ture was a picture of 100 or more
earthen pitchers which were found at
the bottom of a buried well. He show-
ed a slide of the oldest bit of Latin
literature, inscribed in a column in
the forum, a copy of which is in the
basement of Memorial hall.
"I wonder if the students of the
future will be shown slides of the
forum as it was when visited by Pres-
ident Wilson in 1919," said Professor
Crittenden in conclusion.
WEATHER MAN INCONSISTENT
WITH LAST YEAR'S RECORDS
Detroit, Jan. 16.-Last Sunday, Jan.
12, was the anniversary of southern
Michigan's "big" cold wave of last
winter, the date when the mercury fell
to 13 degrees below zero in the city
of Detroit. That cold wave brought
to thousands of lower Michigan peo-
ple keen suffering because of the fuel
shortage.
This year there is no fuel shortage,
stocks being almost up to the nor-
mal, but coal is still being shipped in.
fSo far a fairly mild winter has great-
ly helped conserve fuel stocks here
rand elsewhere in the state.
Parts of the northern peninsula are
,enveloped in deep snow, while the
southern portion of the state has gone
well into 1919 without more than an
occasional flurry.

Joseph Bonnet, eminent French or-
ganist will appear for the second time
in Ann Arbor at 8 o'clock Saturday
evening in Hill auditorium.
Monsieur Bonnet was in the trenches
the first part of the war but was tak-
en out on account of his extraordinary
talent. He was one of the most popular
musicians of last year's May Festival
and expressed much appreciation of
Ann Arbor and the welcome that he
received here. He will present the
following p gram:
First Sonata ....Alexandre Guilmant
Introduction and allegro
Pastorale
Finale
(a) "In Dulci Jubilo" (Christmas
Song)....................Bach
(b) Prelude and Fugue in D major
.Bach
(a) Gavotta ...........Padre Martini
(b) Choral in A minor ..Cesar Franck
(a) Elfes .. . ........Joseph Bonnet
(b) Romance Sans Paroles......
.Joseph Bonnet
(c) Variations de Concert......
.Joseph Bonnet
(With pedal cadenza)
OVER 100 FOREIGN
STUDENTS GATHER
More than 100 people mingled to-
gether at the Cosmopolitan club
meeting held last night at Newberry
residence. Mr. Dyason, who acted as
chairman, introduced Miss Woo,
Messrs. Chow, Lubke, Katsuizumi, and
Elkind, who gave reports on the 12th
convention of the National Corda Fra-
tres association of Cosmopolitan clubs,
held in Chicago during, the Christmas
vacation.
Then Mr. Chenik announced the
Polish evening, to be held Jan. 25,
earnestly asking for the co-operation
of those present to make this event a
success.
The remainder of the evening was
given over to music and refreshments.
Miss Hildner gave a number of vocal
solos, and Miss Claphack entertained
with several selections on the piano.
Dean Myra B. Jordan and Miss Lucy
Elliott were the hostesses for the eve-
ning.
PREDICTS AIR AGE
FOR GREAT BRITAIN
London, Jan. 16 (Correspondence of
the Associated Press).-"The wonders
of today in the air will be as naught
compared with the wonders of to-
morrow," was the way J. A. White-
head, the inventor, summed up his
view of the future of aviation in an
address here.
"The face of the world" he declar-
ed, "will be changed. Our towns and
cities will be as different from the
towns and cities of today as the
streets and houses of London are dif-
ferent from the streets and buildings
destroyed by the Great Fire. Our
methods of life will be changed. Our
ideas of speed will alter. We shall
be the people of the Air Age."
He said that England's future as a
nation depended on the question of
the commercial use of aircraft, and
that this country's task would be to
control the aerodromes of the world.
"They must be planned and laid out,"
he continued, "by our own workmen.
We should develop, by means of air-
craft, distant and undeveloped parts
of the world and secure international
co-operation for the development of
commercial aircraft.
The success of the business world
is won by. speed. The use of the air-
plane in the development of the

world's resources is a matter not alone
for the city man and the suburban
speculator, but for the government.
An exploration department to find out
how our surplus labor and wealth can
best be expended for the good of the
nation is not only an idea-it is a
duty."
Noted Hun Intriguer Murdered
London, Jan. 16.-Rosa Lusemburg,
one of the most prominent intriguers
.in Berlin, has been murdered, ac-
pording to a dispatch from that city
received by the Exchange Telegraph
company by way of Copenhagen.

ernoon in the annual fall rites of the
Vulcans, senior engineering society.
The concert-providers were: D. G.
Bovee, P. E. Carrick, H. R. Thompson,
W. H. Dorrance, R. W. Elliott, L. L.
Smith, W. E. Groves, J. P. McFarlan,
E. M. Miller, D. H. Rankin, and F. L.
Spanagel. When the anvil had been
properly castigated, several buildings
on the campus were honored with
portions of the traveling ceremony.
which reached its climax in the annual
banquet at the Cutting.
The menu, "forged from the food
foundry," contained such appetite ac-
celerators as Cow Chops on Toad
Stools, Boiled Ball Bearings, and
Burning Brands from Below.
Toastmaster J. R. McWilliams then
gave the signal for a series of Gas
Grenades, thrown by E. C. L. Mat-
thews, Prof. J. H. Cissel, Prof. H. H.
Higbie, and R. W. Elliott.
LEADERS TO SOLVE
RUSSIAN SITUATION
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 16.-The meeting of the
supreme war council at the foreign
office this morning, occupying two
hours, was the only formal gathering
of the peace delegation today. As
summed up in the official commu-
nique, the Russian situation and the
conference relations with the press
were the only subjects treated.
At the meeting with President Wil-
son Premier Lloyd George, Secretary
Lansing and 'Mr. Balfour remained
for some time in the ante chamber
of Pichon's office in earnest conver-
sation.
The discussion of the Russian sit-
uation appears to havo bewn confined
to an agreement to an exchange of
available information through the de-
termination of having a joint exam-
ination of the subject, as stated in
the official communique, indicates that
the Russian situation will be one of
the -subjects to be taken under the
earliest consideration.
WEALTHY INVENTOR
D I E S AT EVANSTON

Montenegrin Government
One Representative 'at
Peace Congress

Asks
Allied

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Jan. 16.-Edward War-
rien, president of the International
Sunday School union, died today at
Evanston. His home was at Three
Oaks, Mich., and he also maintained
a residence in Evanston. Mr. War-
rien, born at Ludlow, Vt., in 1847, ac-
quired a fortune in a manufacture of
a substitute for whalebone, which he
invented in 1883. He was president
*of the World's Sunday School conven-
tion held in Jerusalem in 1904.
GIRLS MAY ATTEND MOVIE
SHOWS BI-WEEKLY AT "Y"
Permission has been obtained from
Dean Myra B. Jordan for the Univer-
sity women to attend the bi-weekly
movie shows given at Lane hall. These
shows were one of the features of the
S. A. T. C. regime but they will be
continued for the remainder of the
year. The pictures which are obtain-
ed through the Community Motion
Picture Bureau are shown Wednesday
and Saturday evenings from 7:30 to
8:30.. *
Mabel Djormand in "Joan of Platts-
burgh" is scheduled for next Saturday
night. Among the other stars to be
shown there soon are the ever popu-
lar Wm. S. Hart and Charles Chap-
lin. Beside the features a travelogue
will be shown.
SOME FRATERNITIES OCCUPY
RENTED HOUSES FOR PRESENT
Several of the fraternities on the
campus have rented other houses than
their old ones since the S. A. T. C.
was abandoned. When the Sigma
Phi Epsilon house at 621 Soul State
street burned last week that fratern-
ity moved to 432 Thompson street.
The Beta Phi fraternity is living in
the old Xi Psi Phi house, 1001 East
Huron street.
The former Gamma Eta Gamma
house, 807 South State street, has
been leased to the Zeta Beta Tau fra-
ternity. They will occupy it next
semester.

RUMNIA RECEIVES
ULTIMAT*UM FROM
SERBIAN SOLDIERS TAKE TOWN
IN MONTENEGRO; SERBS
APPEAL TO U. S.
RUSS TROOPS MARCH
ON BUAOWINA BORDE

(By Associated Press)
JBerne, Jami. 14 (delayed). - The
Ukranian government has sent an ul.
timatum to Rumania demanding the
avacuation of Buaowina, according tE
a telegram received from Kiev to.
day.
Ukranian troops are moving toward
the Buaowinan frontier. Simultane.
ously, the measure adds, the Ukra
nian national council has telegraphe
to President Wilson a request for per.
mission to delegate two American Uk
ranians to represent the Ukraniani
at the peace conference.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 16. - Occupatio
of Montenegro by-Serbian troops ha
resulted in a revolt of Montenegrins
according to an official statement is
sued here tonight at the Montenegrin
legation. Serbian forces of about 20,
000 have succeeded in occupying sev.
eral towns from which the Serbia
forces were driven.
Serbs Send Delegation to Paris
The Serbians, the announcemen
said, have sent a delegation to King
Nicholas at Paris asking that Ameri
can troops be sent to Montenegro t4
preserve order.
Some weeks ago the state depart
ment was informed by the Montene
grin committee for national unity tha
a convention of representatives chos
en by the Montenegrin people ha
met and deposed King Nicholas and
voted to join the country with th
federation of the Serbs, Croats, and
Slovenes under the Serbian dynasty
Wontenegro vesires reace Delegat
Later representatives of the assem
bly went to Belgrade to report this ac
tion and the country was formally ac
cepted by the king regent as the par
of the greater Serbia.
The Montenegrin government ha
.informed the state department tha
the assembly which disposed Kin
Nicholas was without state authority
The legaton informed the state de
partment that they had decided tha
Montenegro should have a represen
tative at the peace conferences
THREE BOOTLEGGER!
FOUND AT SA L I N I
Three bootleggers were arrested a
Saline early Wednesday morninj
when it was found they were car
rying 300 quarts of liquor in th
auto they were driving. Each wa
given $175 fine and $20 costs, or 9
days in the county jail by Judge Sam
ple in circuit court yesterday.
The men were brought here imme
each in suitcases. They were releas
ed on a bond of $1,000 to appedr te
day. For containers two hot wate
bottles, three varnish cans and se
eral regulation cases were used.
Two others were arrested yester
day on the booze runner charge whe
found to be carrying seven quart
each in suitcases. They were releas
ed on $1,000 bond.
The sheriff's department is bein
assisted in catching bootleggers b
26 state constabulary men statone
along the southern border of th
county.
REPRESENTATIVE OF OIL CO.
TO TALK TO SENIOR STUDENT
Mr. W. Wallace of the Standard O
company of New York, will be at tb
Michigan Union 'building at 4:3
o'clock, Jan. 17. He will speak to an
members of the senior class who ma
be interested in the work of the Stan
ard Oil company, outlining its actin

ities fn the Orient, the positions fo
which men are required, manner o
selection and the opportunities offei

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