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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JAN]

'FIClAL NEWSPAPER AT THE;
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGANHE
ished every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
I of Student Publications.
31,k OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news din-
creditedtot 'ornototnerwise credited
.paper and also the local news pub-
herein.
red at the postoftice at Ann Arbor,
;an, as second class matter,
crptions by carrier or mail, $3.3o.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building.
es: Business, 90o; Editorial, 2414.
munications not to excee 300 words,'
ed, the signature not uece sarily to ap-
print, but as an evidence of faith, and
'of events will be published in The
ait the discretion of the Editor, i left
mailed to the office.
gned communications will.receive no
ration. No manuscript will be re-
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
ents expressed in the communications.
I C. Mighell.........Managin Editor
Makinson.......... business Manager
t Ii. Riordan...........News Editor
sR. Osius, Jr. ......City Eritor
rite Clark............Night Edir
C. J. Martin........Telegraph Edito,
B. L~andis..........Sport Editor
Guernsey...........Women's Editor
K. Ehlbert..........#Associate Editor
I. Davis..............Literary Editor
d A. Gaines. Advertising Manager
L. Abele........Publication Manager
M. Major......Circulation Manager
I. LeFevre.........Office Manager

ISSUE
Bernstein
Porter
y

E~DITiORS
Paul G. Weber
Philip Ringer
E. D. Flinteriann

sue

rEPORTFRS
Christie Herman Lustfield
is Bowen Schumacher
el Henry O'Brien
ozier Mary D. Lane
Renaud Sherwood d
BUSINFSS STAFF
Coveil Robert L. McKean
Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
W'elsh Win. A. Leitzinger
k. Cadwell Donnell R Sloffner
choerger Henry Whiting II
IDAY, JANUARY 17, 1918.
sue Editor-Ruth Dailey

RET OR OPEN SESSIONS?1
he American public which looks
secret diplomacy as one of the
al war-prod'ucers which should
tked, along with Hapsburgs and
izollerns, the possibility that the
is of the conference at VersaillesI
e secret is botha disappointment
menace. The disappointment is
f the vitally interested specta-E
id. the menace is two-fold: that
nents may be reached unaccept-E
ir" inexplicable to the peo'ples
le world and that the
chance to introduce open and
board methods of international
g and give 'them fair trial on a
scale may be lost for genera-1
re are some arguments in favor
ret, or perhaps preferably, con-
al diplomacy. The best of these
the vast amount of discussion,F
mes heated to a temperature in
the s irit of conciliation does
urish, ttendant upon unlimited
ity, tends to increase antagon-
tween erstwhile belligerents or
arm allies. The indiscreet utter-
of hot partisans of one or an-
national point of view, fnen who
>t responsible for securing the
may develop disastrous bitter-
It has been instanced that in in-
al business or domestic affairs,
ns are more quickly and amica-
ruck and differences patched up
easily if the neighbors are not
in to witness the conference.
Wlacy in this simile is that the
nent, its conditions and conse-
es, are none of the neighbors'
wss. In this parley at the con-
n of the greatest of all wars, the
ne of which will affect the hap-
of all of us and of our children,
e all, or should be, equally inter-
It is as much the business of
wery newsie as'of Woodrow Wil-
s far as the ultimate stake is
'ned. Wilson is simply assum-
s,ponsibility for the action of the
but the newsie has as much in-
in it as he. Consequently he
right to know what his partner
ig and to have his opinion carry
weight. The danger that he may
liscreet in expressing it is un-
.ble; it Is his right and he must;
it.
t this fact is recognized by the
can and British representatives!
conference is shown by theiri
tous efforts to secure full public-
Our Latin Allies oppose it, un-;
edly because they dare not trust]
iblic opinion behind them. OPer-
they are right-they know their
tions better than we do, and un-
onably the entire population of
dited States and the United King-
ven including Ireland; would not
up the rumpus around a peace
that one Sicilian hamlet or gang
azilian vaqueros could produce.
e time has come to take the big
e. The enlightened peoples of
rorld cannot be excluded rrom
own affairs because less, enight-
peoples 'are also concerned in

them. And the probability Is very
strong that less advanced populations
are more trustworthy and intelligent
on the vital issues of peace than their
leaders give them credit for.
BRINGING BACK THE "EX" MEN
Large numbers of former Michigan
students who left the University to
enter the service of their country have
been discharged and many others will
be out of service before the beginning
of the second semester. Though many
of these men are undecided as to when
to return to school and even whether
they will ever return or not, nothing
has been done to bring them back.
In many cases it would merely take
a single communication from the Uni-
cversity or even from some old friend
here to decide them in favor of return-
ing. If some of them knew that they
are able to receive University credit
for their military work, in some cases
as much as 12 hours, they would not
hesitate to return as soon as possible.
In fact, all that is needed is something
to remind them of the fact that col-
lege graduates are and will be needed
more than ever and that it is to their
advantage to complete their courses
as soon as possible.
Other colleges and universities are
conducting campaigns to get former
students to return and it is time for
something along this line to be start-
ed at Michigan. The most plausible
way of accomplishing the desired end
would be for the University to send
out a circular letter welcoming the
men back and informing them con-
cerning the credit for military work.
Students could be urged to furnish
names and addresses of discharged
men. This ould be supplemented by
personal letters from students urging
the men to return.
If the University does not see fit
to take such action it could merely
make public the conditions under
which these men may come back
and trust to, students explaining them
in personal letters. In addition alumni
associations could be urged to be on
the lookout for Michigan men who are
in such a state of indecision and do
what they can to have them return.
A. great deal could be done towards
bringing men back with but a small
expenditure of effort and if nothing is
done the University and society will
be the losers.
Most freshmen seem to have grasp-
ed the idea that discarding frosh pots
is zero In disguise.. The mule hid his
ears, but couldn't resist the temptation
to make a few remarks.
People are asking what the news-
papers will find to write about if the
peace sessions are secret. That's easy.
Amsterdam and Zurich are still on the
map.
There is some talk of introducing a
constitutional amendment to prevent
apple cider and prune juice from fer-
menting.
Bad news for the unscrupulous.
The exanm questions are to be printed
in Chicago.
COUNTY RED CROSS TO HELP
FAMILIES SOLVE PROBLEMS
Problems, medical, legal, financial,
and others slightly less common are
being dealt with at present by the
home Service Section of the Ameri-
can Red Cross in Washtenaw county.
The work of this organization is pri-
marily for the families of soldiers
and sailors.
Work for a girl of 15 years of age
is desired immediately. Arrange-

ments might be made for her to live
at the place where she works, or she
will live at home and work, or she
school until 8 or 9 o'clock in the even-
ing. It further particulars are desir-
ed, call at No. 7 Nickels Arcarde be-
tween 9 and 2 o'clock in the morning,
or by phone, 386M.
RIE(AtLAR LEAGUE PARWTY TO BE
GIVEN IN HONOR OF NURSES
,A Women's league party will be giv-
en at 4'o'clock this afternoon in hoQ-
or of the nurses. In addition to danc-
ing a stunt will be given to entertain
the gu-sts. For the girls who prefer
sewing to dancing, material will be
turnished with which to make hospital
Many nurses have expressed the de-
sire l join the organization, and it is
hoped that an unusually large num-
ber of members will be present to
welcome ther into the league.
Former Student Dies ;f P elinonia
Peter M. Davitt, '12L, is dead of
pneumonia at his home in Highland
Park after a short illness. Following
his graduation, he went directly to
practicing law in Highland Park. He
is survived by his widow, his mother
and five brothers. The body will be
taken to Wilkesbarre, Pa., where the
mother and brothers are now resid-
ing.

January Technic
Appears on Sale
"Coal and the Public Utilities" by
Prof. John C. Parker is the title of a
contribution in the Michigan Technic
the quarterly published by the engin-
eering college. The January number,
containing a number of interesting ar-
ticles and some special features, came
out yesterday.
Prof. A. F. Greiner has continued the
series of articles on the history of in-
ternal combustion engines dealing with
gas turbines. The .title of his contri-
bution to this number is "A Critical
Review of the Different Phases of
Evolution and History of the Eternal
Combustion Engine." "Some Recent
Installations of Lang Gates" is the
subject treated by an alumnus, Donald
May, '10.
In the section called "College Notes"
is a comprehensive article on the S.
A. T. C. One of the courses in draft-
ing has been moved to the Law build-
ing, and a notice called "The Impossi-
ble Has Happened - Engineers Inhabit
Law Building" tells all about it. The
number concludes with a history of
Camp Davis during the summer of
1918. Pictures of the faculty apid the
students are also shown.
ANNOUNCE ANNUAL
PARTY POSTPONED
The Women's league fancy dress
party which was to have been held
Jan. 24, has been postponed to Satur-
day, Jan. 25 on account of other events
conflicting.
Sororities, dormitories, and league
houses are asked to come dressed as
groups, to compete for a prize offer-
ed for the best. There will also be
prizes for the ugliest, prettiest, clev-
erest, funniest, and individual -cos-
tumes. Groups wishing to compete
for the prize are asked to notify Cor-
nelia Clark, '21, by Jan. 23.
Classes, as usual, will give "stunts"
each during the itermissions between
the dances, for which prizes will like-
wise be given.
Admission will be 10 cents for those
in costume, and 15 cents 'for specta-
tors.

WLfomen
A call has come to the University
hospital for a University student who
is able. to teach commercial arith-
metic and also for a tutor in comj
mercial English. For further inform'
ation apply to Hulda Bancroft at Bar-
bour gymnasium.
A meeting of the board of represent-
atives of the Women's league will be'
held at 9 o'clock Saturday morning in
Barbour gymnasium.
One hundred and fifty hospital shirts
have been received by the War Work,
committee of the Women's league. All
girls who are able to sew are urged
to communicate with Florence Field,
'20, chairman of the War Work com-I
mittee.
All senior women are invited to a
(ea to be given from 3 to 5 o'clock
Saturday, Jan. 18, at the Kappa Alpha
Theta sorority.
IV AIr OVEII, I.I aL TNOII'If"WESrT
MOU-NTED PLIE EOG IE
Regina, Sask., Jan. 16. - Canada's
Scarlet Riders, the Royal Northwest
Mounted Police, who left the Dominion
to further distinguish themselves on
the battlefields of France, are to be re-
organized on a plre-war basis, accord-
ing to an announcement by govern-
ment officials.
Squadrons of the famous riders who
for years have patrolled the prairies,
mountains, forests and Arctic wastes
of Canada, will be returned from over-
seas and permitted to rejoin their old
force, which will be recruited to a
strength of 1.200 men.
Regina will continue to be general
headquarters and the territory policed
will extend from Port Arthur to Brit-
ish Columbia and far into the vast
stretches of the No Man's land of the
North. District headquarters will be
re-established at Winnipeg, Regina,
Prince Albert, Lethbridge, Edmonton,
Vancouver and Dawson. Outposts will
be established at Macleod, Battleford,
Maple Creek and Peace River.
As the war progressed, members of
the famous band who had faced death
innumerable times by daring dashes
into the wilderness after criminals, one
by one dropped out to join the over-
seas forces until the organization had
all but disbanded. Official reports have
shown that they continued their in-
trepid exploits in the war zone.
Tryouts are wanted for the ed-
itorial and business staffs of The
Michigan Daily. Editorial try..
outs call between 1 and 3 o'clock
in the afternoon; business try-
outs after 5 -o'clock.

AR'

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy usng the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASKA US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
iNickel'. Arcad)

Engineers

BUY THEM NOW - - THAT SET OF

Drawing Instruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Second-Hand Sets

THE

"Y" INN AT LANE HALL

Students! Eat where you get the proper kind of
food. All Home Cooked Food.
Lunch, 11:45-12:45 . .. 40 cents
Dinner, 5:30-6:30 . . 50 cents
Lunch and Dinner, per week, $5.00

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Service Table d'Hote

Open to Men and Women

FOR LIBERTY

SHEEHAN &CO
FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOJR ROOM INVITINC
Here's hoping you have a fine New Year.--Sheehan

The following casualties are re-
,ported today by the commanding gen-
eral of the American Expeditionary
Forces: Died from wounds, 100; died
from accident and other causes, 15;
wounded severely,139; wounded slight-
ly, 15. Total, 269.
Reinstatement with full credit for a
year's academic work was advocated
by the University of Nebraska for all
students who left school to enter the
service.
Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

A great effort is being made to
place the school of commerce at the
University of Nebraska among the
first in the country. Many new cours-
es in practical economics mapped out
by the Harvard university bureaus will
be given.

Open for Business

ALWAYS
WELCOME

CAMPUS LUNCH

338 S. State. Next to Cushings
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arboi and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7:zo a
m., and hourly to 9:ro p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cyrs-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Mx:
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:05 p. rn., 10:50 p. M.
To Ypsilanti only, T1:45 p. M., 12:20 a. In.,
1:10 a. in., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti,
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. rn, to
12:20 a. in.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:20 a. m. to 12:00 p. M.
Phone 1620-R

GO TO

The Mayer-Schairer

Company
112 S. Main St.

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

FOR

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks

_...

TOURISTS AND OUTERS KITS
BTIA
BIG REDIUCTION'

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT,to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.... $4000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. M O RRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting
Mimeographing

I

Khaki Kits at

: 1-3 off

1Leather and Silk Kits at 1-4 offt
THE EBERBACH & SON CO.
200-204 East Liberty Street

Chairs
Book Cases

i

I

I Has moved to
NickelsArcade I

I

I

U

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