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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1919 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TO

JAS

TIJ 4

OFFICIAL NlWSLAPLR AT T1iE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every moaning except Monday
.uring thc university year by the: Board in.
Control of Student lublications.
tEMBER OF TilE ASSOCIATI-D PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
so the use for repubication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otnerwise credited
in this paper and also the local news pub-
lished herein.
lintered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
alchigana, as becond class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
phones: Business, 960; ELditorial, 2414.
Coinmunicatio ns not to exceed 300 words,
i signed, the sikgrature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of taith, and
notices of events vill be published Ii The
Gaily at Lhe disctioi iof the Editor, it ieft
at or mailed to the oilice.
Unsigned comnunications will receive no
consideratnvn. iNo manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
ITe Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mildred C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
Harold Makinson..........business Manager

ncent H. Riordan...........News
arles R. Osius, Jr..............City
Irguerite Clark .........Night
res C. J. .Martin---------. elebrapli
vid B'. Landis--------------Sport
rtha Guernsey...........Wonen's
rkR . albeit.............Associate
Jen 1. .Davis--------------.Literary

E(ditor
EQIor
EdiCxr
Ed itor
r Editor

LeGrand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
Agnes L. Abele.........Pgblication Manager
' ";onald M. Major.......irculation Manager
Wn. M.LeIevre ......O. ice M'anager
ISSUE EDITORS
Joseph A. Bernstein Paul G. Weber
liorace W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey L. D. Flitern n
R FP0R'! LERS
Marsaret Christie EHerman Lustfield
Irene Ellis Bowen Schumacher
Edna Apel Henry O'Brien
Marie Crozier Mary D. Lane
Renaud Sherwood
BUSINESS STAFF.
Mark B. C UEvell Robert i. McKean
dward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva R. Welsh < Win. A. eitzinger
George A. Cadwell Donnell R. Shoffner
Joel F. Schoerger Henry Whiting II
'TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1919.
Issue Editor--Edgar D. Flintermann
THE CRUX
Ajterica's desire to see a world safe
for its peoples; to establish a just
peace; one that will eliminat the in-
justices that have caused mo of the
wars of the past, is now being put to
the test. The peace conferences have
begun. The United States, with its
Allies has defeated its armed foes.
National unity has been demonstrated
and solidified. Th people of the Un-
ited States have learned impressively
valuable lessons of their capacity for
positive action and f self-sacrifice.
In all these things the United States
has emerged from the war a winner.
And the benefit we have all derived
from these things is incalculable.
But the war will have been fought
to a. great extent in vain by the Unit-
ed States pnd the Allies unless the
peoples have learned to desire a just
peace. Especially will the United
States have failed to gain one of its
most cherished objects in the prose-
cution of the war. We did not enter
the war to gain material advantages
for any nation at the unjust expense
of any other nation.
We knew that a war of aggression
is a dreadful, stupid, crime. We
knew that a war cannot bring good.
We knew that wars of liberation or of
defense are breeders of horror to those
in the right as well as those in the
wrong; that they stop progress to-
ward the amelioration of the condition
of humanity; that they suspend the
war of man against nature while men
war on each other. The people of
United States wished that wars to
right wrongs should never again be
needful, and that wars of aggression
should be made impossible. For our
own safety and the safety of our child-
ren; for the sake of all humanity we
wanted wars to cease, and we backed
up our wishes with our arms.
Now we go to the peace table, to at-
tempt to establish this reign of world-
wide justice. ,.President Wilson has
proposed a League of Nations, and men
close to him have intimated that his
ideas were fairly definite as to what
such a League should be. But all re-
ports agree that President Wilson is
willing to back any plan that will end
the causes of war, no matter what its
name or substance. Of all plans that
have been suggested the League of
Nations idea seems to be best calculat-
ed to bring about the desired resu t
But opposition has arisen in Europe
and in this country to any plan that.
embraces the principles of'the League
of Nations. The greatest apparent op-
position to it is in France. President
Wilson says the old "balance of pow-
er" idea must go, and within a few
days the French premier, Clemenceau,
says he favors the "balance of power."
Whether the differences between the
two men are as real as apparent re-

mains to be seen. We read of'secret
treaties which Italy is unwilling to
annul but which give Italy territory.
wherein resides a people that does
not want I'talian domination, but Ital-
ian crowds shout spontaneous huz-

stands. We read that Engrnd will nev-
er submit to naval limitation, but Eng-
lish soldiers, returning to the home
soil, congregate and cry that English
troops shall no longer fight Russians,
and the government promises to send
no more English troops to Russia, In
the United States, interests urge that
we must have universal military
training, which would be contrary to
the disarmament idea of a League of
Nations.
So the two forces to which we are
accustomed, the force that favors un-
restricted individualism, and the force
that favors relinquishment of as
,much individualism as is necessary to
relinquish for the general good and
the general peace ;have begun their
contest, with nations as individuals
and the world as the stage and the
happiness of your dear ones and my
dear ones and the dear ones of nearly
two billion others as the stakes.
THE MODER* WAY TO KICK
It has come to be recognized in civ-
ic affairs that cl4an-ups and reforms
come only when the plain people unite
in demanding them and go after them
through responsible agents and in a
systematic way. This is being dem-
onstrated in this University commun-
ity through the efforts of the health
service to secure something like stand-
ard sanitary conditions in dooming
and boarding houses. For generations
the hoary hash and landlady jokes
have been passed appreciatively wher-
ever students foregather and while oc-
casional indignant groups protested
against unusually distasteful condi-
tions, the present dignified and impart-
ial survey marks the new era of com-
munity efficiency. It deserves the sup-
port of students, and needless to say,
will get that of all better-class room-
ing and boarding house keepers.
Parliament is not the most august
body in the world to admit women to
membership. The ex-Kings' club has
just taken in the duchess of Luxem-
bourg.
If we have many more of these
balmy January days, the young man's
fancy is going to turn several months
too soon.
And to think that in a few short
weeks the new boad walk to the Lib-
rary will be as thronged as Atlantic
City's.-
Being a member of the Cabinet is
evidently not as profitable as most
political jbs.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC STUDENTS
TO GIVE RECITAL WEDNESDAY
Advanced students of the Univer-
sity School of Music will give a re-
cital at 4:15 o'clock Wednesday aft-
ernoon in Friese hall of the School
of Music. The general public is in-
vited to attend.
The following program will be pre-
sented:
Lotus Land ..............Cyril Scott
Caprice espagnole........Moszkowsky
Marion Bath
Adoration .................Borowski
SophiaWolczynski
Prelude and Fugue...........Bach
Edith Staebler

A Pied Galley
B. B.
A conscience is a terrible uncom-
fortable thing. It clings to one like
tuberculosis or a bunch of silly letters
that have been sent. It haunts one
like the smell of blood or creme de
rose. It makes one afraid to answer
the telephone or the doorbell - ini
short, it is a hunch that someone is go-
ing to babble.
The Sophomore Rosary
'IThe hours I spend with thee, old top,
Are as the hours of jail to me.
I think them over every one apart---
Anatomy! Anatomy!
Each gland a vein, each vein a nerve,
And somewhere there's an artery;
We follow up each muscle to its end,
And there a bone is found.
Oh memories will stay with me,
Until this fleeting life is o'er,
We study hard and try at last to learn;
To meet the Quizz, Sweet Quizz
To meet the Quizz.
--The Minnesota Daily.
Confidance of Long Acquaintance
From good old Lunnon to New York
-thence to Toronto and to us in the
wilds of the middle west comes this
tale of the national pastime and its
hold upon the Allies.
An East Indian approached the plate
at a crucial moment and cried aloud,
"Allah, give me the strength to make
a hit."
He struck out.
"The next man up was an Irishman.
He spat on the plate, made faces at
the pitcher and yelled,
"You know me, Al."
He made a home run.r
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS RETURNS
TO OFFICES FORMERLY USED
Offices of the Michigan Alumnus
were moved back Saturday to their,
regular quarters in the southwest
corner of Memorial hall. Due to the3
temporary use of that building as a
hostess house, the Alumnus was in-
stalled across the hall on Sept 23.
No inconvenience was suffered by the'
temporary change of quarters except
that the improvised office was some-
what darker than the regular room
which they are again occupying.
Thirty-seven scholarships have beeni
awarded to students at Harvard., In
this way students will be granted aid
for the next two terms.

VARIED WORK FOR
NURSING COURSE
Miss Dora Barnes, professor of
the newly authorized department of
public health nursing in the medical
school, will begin her course in that
subject with the new semester and
only graduate nurses and seniors in
approved training schools will be eli-
gible. It will consist of lectures and
discussions until spring vacation, aft-
er which a new phase of the work
will be introduced. Trips will be
made to Detroit and other nearby ci-
lies to study clinics, school, conta-
gious, tuberculosis, and city nursing.
Miss Barnes is a graduate of Mount
Holyoke, and the Johns Hopkins
-xo plf svil auS -sasinu . 0 looiPs
perience in city nursing in New York
and during the recent influenza epi-
demic she was in charge of 150 cases
of the disease among' men in the serv-
ice who were stationed in New .York
city. As professor of public nursing
at the George Peabody college for
teachers in Nashville, Tenn., she su-
pervised a course similar to the one
of which she will be in charge here.
MAZDA LAMPS MAY
ILLUMINATE CITY
The whole system of street lighting
in Ann Arbor may be changed, ac-
cording to Mr. E. T. Cope, of the De-
troit Edison company. This company
has already installed 600 mazda lamps
along State street and other neighbor-
ing streets. If these are found to be
better than the old arc lights which
are generally used, it is expected that
the city council wil, order the whole
city system be changed to mazda
lamps.
The mazda system of lighting has
many advantages over the arc method,
declared Mr. Cope. Mazdas give great-
er illumination and do away with the
spots so often seen beneath the are
light and, he said, the cost of operat-
ing and maintaining the new system is
materially less than the old method.
CARNEGIE FOUNDATION PLAN
DETAILS TO BE PUBLISHED
Copies stating definitely the propo-
sition of the 'Carnegie Foundation's
new plan in regard to annuities and
insurance, are now being printed andt
will be mailed to each member of the+
several faculties of the University.1
The plan is that which was recently

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL
Cream of Tomato Soup
Chicken a la King - Ma4ed Potatoes
Candied Yams - Buttered Peas
Cranberry Sauce
Fruit Salad
lce Cream - MapleSauce - Home-Made Cake
Milk - Tea - Coffee
STARRBEST
Represented by Pete e. F. Burns showing
SUITS O'COATS SHOES CAPS
SHIRTS IMPORTED NECKWEAR
FRONT ROOMS OVER CALKINS DRUG STORE
JANUARY 12 13 14 15
We habe a fell of our very best trimmed hats left which we
wvill dispose of at a great sacrifice to make room for our
Spring Stock.
STEVENS & PERSHING, 618 Packard

OFFICE COMFORT 'FOR 1019
One of the particular joys of an office is-
A HandyDesk Calendar.
PRICE...75c
"Excelsior" and "National" Diaries, Blank
Books, Card Cabinets, Typewriter
Supplies, etc.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE

I

recommended by the executive com-
mittee of the Board of Regents and
adopted by the Board.
This year's Mask and Wig show at
the University of Pennsylvania will
consist of a review, outlining the his-
tory of the club through the 30 years
of war and peace.

IOpen for Business

ALWYS
WELCOME

CAMPUS LUNCH
BILL AND MERT

i

338 5. State.

Next to Cushings

I

C9S MN G
HRISTM ANuN6,, CLU

Try our HOME-MADE

CANDIES

They are both delicious and
Wholesome

The Home
Dear Little
The Lark
Sonata for

Road ..........Carpenter
Boy of Mine. .Ernest Ball
Robert S. Buol
..... .....Glinka-Balakireff
,Hester Reed
Violin and Piano, G

major..................Grieg
Neva Nelson and Edith Staebler
Variations serieu-ses ....Mendelssohn
Dorothy Newell
LIEUTENANT HORNE, '18, VISITS
ANN ARBOR; WAS IN ARTILLERY
Among visitors to the University
last week was Lieut. AlbertE. Horne,
'18, who received his discharge from
the artillery branch of the service
some three weeks ago and has been
taking a short vacation preparatory
to accepting a position with an ad-
vertising firm in Detroit. Lieutenant
Horne attended the second officers'
training camp at Fort1 Sheridan and
was then assigned to Camp Custer.
He remained there for some time
preparatory to being sent to Camp
Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, where he
was stationed at the time the arm-
istice was signed.
Laeutenant Horne is well known on
te campus, being a member of the
Chi Psi fraternity as well as of the
sphi-x and Michigamua honor so-
cieties. ILe was also efficiency edi-
tor of the U±aly and a member of the
board of dirtOr of the Michigan
Union . During hiz visit to Ann Ar-
bor he spent considerable time at
the Daily office and returned to
Detroit last night to take up his new
duties.
The University of Illinois paid $42,-
000 as a total expense for maintaining

d

IT IS NOT HARI TO GET THAT $63.75 OR $127.50.

MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, rg18)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7 o a.
m., and hourly to 9:1o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars--8:48
a. rn., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ix.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo A. in., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., o:5o p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 1 1:45 p. in., 12:20 a. M.,
r :1o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m.,' to
12:20 a. m.
WAT KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. iM.
Phone 1620-R
314 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O. D. MORR I LL I

BRING IN THE 5 CENTS OR 10 CENTS NOW AND EACH WEEK
INCREASE YOUR PAYMENTS THE SAME AMOUNT, OR YOU CAN
JOIN OUR 50 CENT, $1.00 OR $5.00 CLUB, WHERE YOU PAY IN THE
SAME AMOUNT EACH WEEK. IN 50 WEEKS:

10-CENT CLUB PAYS $127.50

5-CENT CLUB PAYS
2-CENT CLUB PAYS
1-CENT CLUB PAYS

68.75
25.50
12.75

ALL THE MONEY YOU PAY INTO THE CHRISTMAS BANKING
CLUB IS YOURS. THERE ARE NO DUES OF ANY KIND. COME IN
AND JOIN TODAY.

YOU WILL RECEIVE 3 PER CENT INTEREST.

~J~r 3Iarnu~r0& I~rnA,~ &

Typewriters
'typewriting
Mimeographing

101-103.105 SOUTH MAIN STREET

330 SOUTH STATE STREET

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

i

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