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December 20, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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RINER MAY ISSUES
ADVICE TO TRACK MEN,

ASKS ,CANDIDATES TO KEEP INI
TIP TOP CONDI-
TION
Vacation is to have no effect upon
the development of the Maize and
Blue track team this season if Train-
er May's plans work out.
To keep his proteges in shape during
the period of rest from studies, the
expert physical director, in an inter-
view with a Daily representative, ask-
ed that his plans be made public, that
those aspirants toward the short trous-
ered team will be able to make a
good showing when the regular sea-
son is on.
Despite the fact that it may be a
childlike exercise, skipping rope is
ideal for keeping the muscles of the
leg in tip top shape, the doctor says,
and for this reason, he asked that the
men who expect to work on the team,
partake freely of the exercise.-
"When ever you get a chance," is the
instruction of the trainer, "run around
a gym track for a while to keep your-
self in running practice. Every Y. M.
C. A. in the country has a track, so
take advantage of it."
ENGINEERS' ISSUE
NEW CATALOGUE
An effort has been made by the
faculty of the colleges of engineering
and architecture to re-adjust the
schedules of those men who are hope-
lessly behind in their work on ac-
count of sickness or unusual military
duties by issuing a special announce-
ment of courses. Copies may be ob-
tained at the office of Secretary Hop-
kins. Students are advised to make
those changes in their schedules
which are deemed advisable at once.
It is the policy of the College of
Engineering and Architecture to use
the time still left before the end-
ing of the semester to intensify the
work, thereby hoping to cover the
work done in a normal semester.
$500.00 A MONTH
Men and Women, Soldiers, Sailors,
Marines and Boy Scouts cordially re-
quested to secure territory and sam-
ples of HISTORY OF THE WORLD
by Francis A. March Ph.D., in col-
laboration with noted war corre-
spondents and military analyst. In-
troduction by General Peyton C.
March Chief of Staff,,-Highest /OfMl-
cer in United States Army.-800 pag-
es-200 wonderful official illustra-
tions. Credit extended . Four hours
a day means $30.00. A pleasure to
sell. Every Service Star i sale. Ele-
gantly bound. Price only $4.00. Write
at once. LIBERTY WAR BOOK
ASSN., 1826-28 Penobscot Bldg., De-
troit, Mich.-Adv.

TRACKMEN-NOTICE ;
Immediately upon their return
from the Christmas vacation, all
candidates for the Varsity track
squad are asked to report to
Trainer May in Waterman gym-
nasium, that lockers may be as-
signed to them, and that the
work outs may start without de-
lay.

TO BE RESUMED AT CLOSE
VACATION WITH INTEN-
SITY

OF

LAST QUINTET PRACTICE
Of YEAR HELD YESTERDAY

The trainer is anxious that
candidates report not later than
the first day after the vacation.
He does not want to lose any
time.
Predicts New Era
in U. S. Finance
Washington, Dec. 19.-Because of
the fact that during the war approx-
imately 200 billion dollars of capi-
tal was destroyed and about eight
million workers were killed, the pro-
ductive power of the world has been
greatly decreased. In view of this
fact the December bulletin df the
federal reserve board predicts a new
era in American finance "replete with
new and momentous problems de-
manding no less serious consideration
than those of the war."
The result of reduced production
will be lower wages and a lower
standard of living. In order to put
what capital- we have to the best ad-
vantage the federal reserve board an-
nounces its intention to ration the
financial resources of the country
during the transition period, not
widely differing from the action tak-
en when the nation was at war. Some
suggestions made for a sound econom-
ic basis for the future were: aid to
foreign governments through the me-
dium of the banks; limitation of in-
dustry to "those lines which may
properly be called essential," and
methods for the absorption of war
loans.
At present large numbers of bonds
are held by banks and as it is desir-
able that the bank capital be freed
the federal reserve board urges that
this be accomplished by personal
saving on the part of the people.
Mr. Earl V. Dye, instructor in
money and banking in the economics
department when discussing the situa-
tion said, "The floating of many bil-
lions of government loans has re-
sulted in the great inflation of'prices
and the interruption of international
flow of gold. This has put us at a
disadvantage in foreign trade.
"The plans of the federal reserve
board,' 'he said, "can not, of course,
be questioned. They are decidedly for
the best."
From this time forward the bulk
of our foreign financing will .neces-
sarily return to a peace basis and
services of our banks will lie in sup-
plying means of financing the move-
ment of consummable goods to for-
eign countries by which they are
needed.

With the last basketball practice of
the year held in the high school gym-
nasium yesterdayv afternoon, Coach
Mitchell's squad of quintet men went
through a workout that, according to
the coach makes him feel good.
With the practice filled with a lot
of pep, despite the fact that just
passing the ball and shooting baskets
was all it was composed of the hopes
for the second season of basketball
at Michigan are higher than ever be-
fore.
Ten Men Out
The 10 men left on the squad were
all in uniform on the floor, and went
through the paces like veterans. Big
Cohn, who was switched from center
to forward, is showing remarkable
ability at finding the rings, despite
the fact that he does not get within
a decent distance of the baskets in
actual play.
Hewlitt, the one letter man from
the past season, who is back on the
squad, is really the neucleus about
which the team is being formed. His
position at forward is being made
one of the most aggressive on the
squad.
More Men Expected
Following the return of the men
to school from Christmas vacation,
more candidates for the team are ex-
pected to present themselves. It is
very probable that sufficient material
will be on hand for the team to be
developed into one that will make
In order to accommodate the crowds
the Majestic will run three shows in
the evening; at 7:00, 8:10 and 9:15.-
Adv.

the other runners in the Conference
sit up and take notice.
Since this is only the second year
that basketball has become a major
sport at the school, the champion-
ship of the Conference is probably
beyond the reach of a Maize and Blue
team this year, yet it is expected that
the Wolverines will run well towards
the lead.
Pick- UPS
Plans for the basketball season at
Williamette university are being form-
ulated now and several work outs have
been held. Twenty men have reported
and the prospects for a fast quintet
are good. It is expected that scrim-
mages will be scheduled with prep
school teams before the intercolleg-
iate season begins.
The strict flu ban in Milwaukee will
probably prevent the basketball game
scheduled between Wisconsin and
Marquette universities. Camp Perry
is anxious to have a game with Wis-
consin but as the Badgers play the
Great Lakes and Camp Grant next
week, it is improbable that this con-
test can be arranged without over-
crowding the schedule.
Basketball practice at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin has been a great deal
snappier since the team has been
scrimmaging the freshmen and Coach
Lowman is satisfied with the way they
have been working.
Negotiations for intercollegiate
hockey games between the University
of Toronto, Quenn's and McGill are
still continuing.
The basketball and track schedules
for this year and the football season
for next year for the University of
Kansas were decided at the recent
meeting of the Missouri Valley confer-
ence coaches and managers. Seven
basketball games are scheduled be-
ginning Jan. 17. One indoor track
meet and five outdoor meets have been
arranged.
Come to Oren's if you want a good
Sunday dinner. 1121 S. U.-Adv.
Daily want ads bring results.

With A
Inverted Grand Piano
In your Home This Christmas
you will not only enjoy a Merry Xmas, but will be
assured a lifetime of piano satisfaction. MEHLIN
INVERTED GRAND PIANOS, while constructed
to meet space limitations of modern homes and
apartments, embody that unequalled tonal quality
of a Mehlin Grand Piano-a tone desirable beyond
your fondest expectations.
Come in and hear these matchless Me hlin
Inverted Grand Pianos - we'll' gladly
demonstrate them and arrange convenient
terms of payment. Other instruments
taken as part payment.
SCHAEBERLE & SON
MUSIC HOUSE
1ieS. Main St. Phone 254F-1

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Highest cash price paid for
Liberty Bonds
GEO. SPATHELF
North Side Meat Market, corner
Wall and Broadway. Phone 42

Magazine Subsoriptions
for XMAS CITS
STOFFLET'S Newsstand

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Gloves Are Always

Appreciated Gifts

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Candy'

Pottery

e
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t

Gift Cards

ADLER-ROCHESTER

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CLOTHES

1

We Iish you all

I

Distinction !
Out of the crowd it rises. Away
from the mass it stands in
splendid dominance. Where
success goes, there goes distinc-
tion. In places where men of re-
finement and good taste gather
there Distinction is most at
home. t
Distinction is the outstanding
characteristic of those clothes
that are the first choice of suc-
cessful men everywhere. It is
the prevailing feature of our
new Adler-Rochester Clothes.

Before going home for the holidays why not come in and look over our
extensive and well-ordered stock of men's, women's and children's gloves.
FOR MEN
Kid, suede, and cape gloves in tans and greys, priced from
$1.50 to $3.50
FOR WOMEN
Dress gloves of French kid in white, black, and the favored shades
$3.00 and $3.50
Driving gloves of cape leather with gauntlet wrists, and knitted wool
linings, in tan and grey.
$5.00 to $7.00
Driving gloves of khaki wool, made just like a kid glove, with stitched
backs and strapped wrists.
$2.25
English walking gloves in black, white, ivory, grey, tan, khaki, and
brown. $2.00 to $3.00

A .Merry Christmas!
'usy Iee

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FOR CHILDREN
Gloves of cape and kid. $1.65 to $2.00.

LUTZ
Ii1 CLOTHING STORE

Fur topped, fleece lined kid mittens.

75c and $1.00.

I

217 SO. MAIN ST.

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