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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 20, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, DEC

'FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
lished every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
>l of Student Publications.
BER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
s credited to it ornot otnerwise credited
a paper and also the local news pub-
herein.
red at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
gan, as second class matter.
criptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
ces: Ann Arbor Press Building.
nies : Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
munications not to exceed 300 words,
ed, the signature not Necessarily to ap-
n print, but as an evidence of faith, and
sof events will be published in The
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
mailed to the otice.
igned communications will receive no
eration. No manuscript will be re-
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
eents expressed in the communications.
d C. Mighell.......Managing Editor
d Makinson.........isBusiness Manager

COMMUNICATION ERRS
MASSACRES COMITTED BY FOE
AND DISGUISED CRIMINALS OF
RUSSIA
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
Allow me to express my apprecia-
tion of the promptness and readiness
with which you printed my communi-
cation. Unfortunately there was one
accidental omission of the greatest
importance - indeed the core of the
whole matter. In the sentence be-
ginning "The New York Times * *
(the copy should have read thus in-
stead of New York Tribune) should
have concluded: " * * * that the
occupation of Lemberg and the at-
tending massacres were organized by
Austrian and German bands return-
ing from Russia, and that they were
aided by criminals dressed in Aus-
trian uniforms."
Very respectfully yours
F. W. PAWLOWSKI.

° R. Osius, ;(r.........City
erite Clark .. ... ....Night
C. J. Martin.........('elegraph
1tA. Bernstein ...... ...port
t l. Riorden.........Military,
a guernsey...........Women's
K. LEhlbert............Associate
1. Davis...........Literary

Ediwr
Edito.
Editor
l'ditor
YEditor
kditor
IEditol

rand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
yes L. Abele......... Publication Manager
aId A. Major.......irculation Manager
ISSUE EIDITORS
id Landis EPaul G Weber
ace W. Porter Philip Ringer
h Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
aret Christie Herman Lustfield
e Ellis sBowen Schumacher
a Apel Henry O'Brien
e Crozier Renaud Sherwood
y L.. Lane. Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
B USINE SS STAFF
k B. Covell Robert E. McKean
ard Piiehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
R. Welsh Win. A. Leitzing.er
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1918.

Atfusic Notes

MISSACRES DO OCCUR*
JEWISH LEADERS DECLARE PO-
GROMS HAVE HAPPENED IN P0-
LAND.
Ann Arbor, Dec. 19, 1918.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Professor Pawlowski's statement in
yesterday's Daily denying the recent
reports of massacres of Jews by Poles
in Poland clearly raises a question of
fact. One would be only too happy to
accept this denial, if the reports in
the newspapers were really false and
could be conclusively attributed to
German propaganda. The apologia is
too one-sided, however, and at best
states merely one aspect of the ques-
tion in dispute.
In order that we may have the at-
titude of representative Jews in the
United States toward such denials, may
I, "in the interest of truth and propri-
ety (not to use a stronger expres-
sion)," request you to print the fol-
lowing statement:
Judge Julian W. Mack, president of
the Zionist organization of America,
and Louis Marshall, president of the
American Jewish committee, have
made the following reply to the state-
ment issued by the Polish national
committee and the Polish national de-
partment denying the authenticity of
the reports that have come to this
country concerning pogroms against
the Jews in Poland, and demanding
the appointment of an inter-allied and
American commission to investigate
these reports and set at rest the al-
legations that pogroms have occur-
ed:
"The American representatives of
the Polish National committee and of
the Polish National department have
issued a statement in which they in-
sinuate that the Jews are inimical
to Polish independence and that
groundless charges have been circulat-
ed by them to the- effect that Jewish
massacres are occurring in Poland.
These organizations state that a toint
Hotel Allenel
ANN ARBORS' LEADING HOTEL

demand has been made by them "for
the appointment of an inter-allied and
American commission to be sent into
Poland to investigate existing condi-
tions that Jewish pogroms have been
carried out there."
The American Jewish committee
and the Zionist Organization of
America welcome the appointment of
such a commission most heartily and
stand ready to co-operate with the
Polish organizations in bringing
about the immediate designation of
such a commission. They take this
opportunity to deny that the Jews
are in any way unfriendly to Polish
independence. Their sole desire has
been to secure for the Jews of Po-
land equal civil, political and relig-
ious rights and to safeguard the
rights of all minorities.
They have received from authori-
tative and unprejudiced sources, in
Copenhagen, Amsterdam, London and
The Hague, explicit cablegrams
showing that pogroms are taking
place in Galicia and various parts of
Poland and Roumania. Unfortunate-i
ly there is reason for crediting these
reports, particularly in regard to Po-
land, since a most violent economic
boycott has been waged there against:
the Jews continuously since 1912. Mr.
Dmowski, the president of the Polish
National committee whose represen-
tative in the United States at this
time is Mr. John F. Smulski has pub-
licly admitted his responsibility for
the boycott, and he and his party1
associates have thus far declined to
take any action looking to its termi-
nation. He and Mr. Paderewski, al-
though informed of the alarming re-
ports which have come to us from
Poland, when requested to protest
against these reported uutrages, like-
wise declined to do so.
In these circumstances the imme-
diate appointment and functioning of
such a commission as has been sug-
gested is undoubtedly desirable,' so
that the world may know all the
facts."
Very truly yours,
A T GORNrTZr7KY

It is better this year than ever before and the price
ONLY 5c

WAH 'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

r-
For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

4 1

When you go home
Take with you a

M ICHICAN

CALENDAR

Joseph Bonnet, the well known
French organist who played in the
May festival series of concerts last
May, will again be heard Jan. 18, in
Ann Arbor. Mr. Bonnet has been sent
to the United States by the French
government to convey a message of
French artistry to the American pub-
lic. He is touring the majority of the
music centers of the country.
The University Choral Union now
has a membership of 300 singers un-
der the leadership of Prof. A. A.
Stanley. The organization is prepar-
ing an opera and an oratorio to be
presented at the Victory Commemora-

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

- AT w nm--w

sue Editor-Paul G. Weber

Ir

t

r tion festival to be held next May.

With this issue The Daily bids its
x r ers a Mrry Christmas and a Hap-
py ,New Year and suspends publication
until Wednesday, Jan. 8.
PEACE AND A SWORD
The Wise Men of the East went
through hardships to offer their gifts
at the cradle of Christ, whose birth
we shall celebrate in a few days. Mary
His mother bore him in a manger.
Christ's life, until He was 30 years old
was one of manual service as well as
spiritual. Then His few remaining
years were filled with hardships of
every description. Every man who fol-
lowed Him endured, and knew he was
going to endure, hardships such as few
men experience. His followers for
centuries after His death endured or
risked martyrdom. To this day, the
men and women who follow the ideals
of personal service and sacrifice and
glory' in their brotherhood with man
sub it to what the unimaginativeor
the materialistic call hardships.
"I come not to bring peace, but a
sword," said the exponent of "peace on
earth, good will to men."
He brought the sword for man to
protect the ideals for which He suf-
fered. The soldiers of democracy have
borne the sword and suffered and died
that the world might have freedom of
the mind and soul. The Prophet whose
rule 'of life was to do unto others as
ye should be done by used, a whip to
scourge the money lenders from the
temple, but He would not raise His
voice to save Himself.
All these statements of fact and
opinion are truisms and perhaps are
out of place here. But, after all, Jesus
Christ was the great exponent of per-
sonal service and sacrifice; and it is
that spirit which universities should
and do cultivate, and it is that spirit
which will save the world and make
the war worth-while. It is a good
thing for us to think about in unem-
ployed moments during the holidtys.
This having Christmas in the spring-
time isn't so bad. But Santa will have
to take the runners off his well-
known sleigh and put on wheels and
skid-chains.
The Alsace-Lorraine question seems
to fade into insignificance compared
to the momentous problem of who
shall lead the 1919 J-hop.
In the midst of Christmas shpping,
don't forget Christmas joining. The
Red Cross is calling the roll.
Bring back lots of Christmas neck-
ties and pep, but leave the flu germs
behind.
The kaiser is reported to have chills
and has taken to bed.-Cold feet.
Ann Arbor Lags in Red Cross Drive
Ypsilanti is ahead of Ann Arbor in
the Red Cross drive. Washtenaw
county is coming strong as a whole,
but Ann Arbor is tlot up to the stand-

The University School of Music will
close tomorrow at noon, reopening
Jan. 7.
Enrico Caruso who was unable to
sing at Ann Arbor in October on ac-
count of the influenza epidemic will
be heard some time in March.
A special arrangement has been
made by the School of Music whereby
new students may enroll after vaca-
tion for the balance of the semester.
In order to accommodate the crowds.
the Majestic will run three shows in
the evening; at 7:00, 8:10 and 9:15.-
Adv.

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

A. J. U 1 'lz Y.

I1

I MAKE YOUR SELECTIONS

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES

Chicken Dinner
SUNDAY-11:30 to 2:00
$1.00

of CHRISTMAS

TOILET ARTICLES

PERFUMES

They are bot delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.

1,

Special Attention Given to Dinner
Parties and Banquets

I

IVORY COODS

0

CAMERAS

THERMOS BOTTLES

I

We Suggest
Practical Christmas Gifts

TA

I

T

T HE E BE R BAC H & SON CO-.
200-204 East Liberty Street

Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

11

I

TRAVELING BAGS

COLLAR BAGS
SUIT CASES

WALKING STICKS
UMBRELLAS
NECKWEARt
MUFFLERS
PAJAMAS
GLOVES

11

SILK HOSIERY
SILK SHIRTS
SILK HDKFS.

Why are you
so insistant?

I (

I

LINEN HDKFS.

CLOTHING

BATH ROBES

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:zo a.
mu., and hourly to g:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 48
a. m., and every hourto 9:48 p. in. AMx-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. im., and
every two hours to p:os p. m. o:o p. .M.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 12:20 a. tn.,
i :io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. m. to
12:20 a. m.
WAT KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

WADHAMS & CO*
. State Street Store

a

I

BECAUSE

Going

Home?

Take some of our candy with you,
or leave your order and we
will mail it for you
The Gift Supreme
is a box or basket of candy. We pack
our own boxes. You will find
our candy fresh.

I

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

Besimers' Beefsteak Dinners

I

are so hard to equal

i

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er,' whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O. D. MORRILL
Typewriters ±
Typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickels Arcade Phne 1718
First Floor

I

FREDDIE BESIMERS

Phone 793-R

[709 N. University

113 W. Huron St.

L

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