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December 20, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-20

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t

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARNER

~3aitllr

ASSOCIATED
PRES'
DAY AtND NIGHT WIH
SERVICE

s
.

---- ---

VOL. XXIX. No. 69.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

{ _ _

. ... a a.awaw v

MAJORITY OF MEN
ITVN9NAVL UNIT TO
BE LET OT TODA)
GOBS WILL BE GIVEN ALL TRANS
PORTATION AND MEAL
COST
INACTIVE DUTY PAPERS
COME LATE YESTERDAY
Remainder of the Releases Expecte
During and After Vaca-
tion
Most of the men in the naval uni
will be released today and tomorrow
according to naval headquarters. The
authorities here were waiting unti
they received the papers from Grea
Lakes before they released the men
The release papers, which have been
expected for some time, arrived yes
terday afternoon.
Papers Not All Here
All the release papers have not ar
rived as yet but more are expected
today and, tomorrow. It will take
two or three days to dismiss all the
men, but the naval authorities expec
to be far advanced by tonight. They
feel confident that the men, who wil
be released before vacation, will have
their release papers by Monday, or
Tuesday at the latest.
Put on Inactive Duty
The releases which the, men receive
are not equivalent to the discharges
granted to the men in the army.
They merely relieve the men from
active duty and place them on inac-
tive duty. During the four years for
which they will be kept on inactive
duty they are subject to call and re-
ceive a small amountof pay.
Given Allowances
All the men who asked for trans-
portation home were paid train and
Pullman fare arid money for their
meals.
The unit met in the auditorium of
University hall yesterday afternoon
and were notified of the fact that
they will be released today. Lieuten-
ant Boak of naval headquarters ad-
dressed them and told them what
to do.
Technic to Make
First Appearance
The Michigan Technic published by
the students of the engineering col-
lege, promises to appear for the first
issue of the year immediately after
the vacation with a double number
combining the regular issues of Octo-
ber and December. Leading the table
of contents are three technical articles
by members of the engineering facul-
ty, Prof. A. F. Greimer, who writes on
phases in the history of the internal
combustion engine; Prof. John R.
Parker, "Coal and Public Utilities,"
and Donald C. May, designing engin-
eer, who gives a technical discussion
on some recent installations of hy-
draulic gates. Student contributions
to the paper tell the story of the year's
work in the school and matters of
campus interest.
The engineers' magazine will ap-
pear according to custom for the re-
mainder of the year, other issues ap-
pearing in March and May. The pre-
sent issue, which is now in prepara-
tion, will be mailed to subscribers dur-

ing the Christmas holidays and will
be on sale later in the Engineering
building. It is expected that the cir-
(Continued on Page Six)
S. A. T. C. NOTICE!
Each man who has been dis-
charged from the S. A. T. C. is
required to return his certificate
of honorable discharge before he
will receive his final pay. To
facilitate the clearing up of rec-
ords, it is desired that each man
report at headquarters immedi-
ately, returning his discharge
paper. This ruling came from
the war department after demob-
ilization was well under way.
Men are also requested to give
all possible publicity to this no-

500 MEN RETURN
DISCHARGE PAPERS

,w@Ae~~'otpRt 'A~1rD ON -Ti4 ftPeQN

Complying with the order that wa
sent out Wednesday from the mili
tary headquarters by Major Ralp
H. Durkee, approximately 500 me
had turned in their honorable dis-
charge papers up to last night. Let
ters were sent out to all the men whc
- had been dismissed stating that the
discharge blanks must be turned it
to the authorities here. The papers
will then be sent to the departmen
quartermaster at Chicago in order
that all the men might be included i
the final payroll.. It also stated tha
the papers would be returned with
d the final pay. The letters inclosed a
franked envelope for the return o
the papers but only a small number
of men have turned them in.
t Since the letters have been sent out,
, however, word has been received that
e the discharge papers do not need to
1 be sent to the quartermaster. Never-
t theless they are to be sent to the
. headquarters here, where they will
be checked -over and the recommenda-
- tions for the final payroll will be
sent to the quartermaster.
It was stated at headquarters last
night that those men in company 17
who have been kept here to help in
the work of closing the post will be
dismissed on Saturdayh This number
comprises most of company 17, the
t rest being those who are physically
unfit for discharge. These men of
I course' will not be discharged from
the army until they are well. They
are to be transferred to Fort Wayne
from Detroit.
The serial numbers for the men
who were formerly in the engineer-
I ing reserve have arrived, and any
men who were not discharged for
'this reason will now receive their re-
lease
PRESIDENT WILSON TO
[SIIT KINGOFEGLN
PEACE TONFERENCE PLANS ARE
NOT PROGRESSING AS
EXPECTED
(By Associated Press)
London, Dec. 19.-President Wilson
will probably be the guest of the king
at Buckingham palace during his vis-
it to England. This official announce-
ment was made tonight.
The British government still was
without definite information this eve-
ning regarding the exact date on which
President Wilson will visit London.
The officials are making tentative ar-
rangements to greet him after Christ-
mas as that is the time suggested by
Mr. Wilson for coming to this country.
Paris, Dec. 19.-Definite plans for
the peace conference are not shaping
as rapidly as some of the American
commissioners expected. Meanwhile
President Wilson is taking advantage
of the opportunity to assess public
opinion in France, and incidently in
Great Britian. His advisers say he is
entirely satisfied that these people are
largely in accord with the principles
he has announced as -necessary for a
durable peace.
"GERMANY RUINED"
SAYS DR. RAPHENAU
(By Asociated Press)
London, Dec. 19.--"Germany is ruin-
ed for generations, politically, indus-
trially, and economically," Doctor
Walter Raphenau, president of the
German General Electric company is
quoted as declaring to the Berlin cor-

respondent of the Daily Express.
"It is the greatest calamity that has
happened to any country in 2,000
is one of the largest employes of labor
years," added Doctor Raphenau, who
in Germany.
"If the indemnities are high, we
shall have nothing with which to ex-
pand our industries and there will be
a great tide of emigration, probably to
South America, the far East, and cer-
tainly to Russia. The result will be
the Balkanization of Europe."
LIEUT. E. If GIBSON, '20E,
REPORTED KILLED IN ACTION
Lieut. Edward B. Gibson. '20E, has
been officially reported kiilled in ac-
tion about Nov. 3. Lieutenant Gibson
was an aviator and had been in the

- I
r-

HELEN FRASER TO
ADDRESS STUDENTS
Miss Helen Fraser, noted English
woman, will speak here on Friday,
Jan. 17, on "Reconstruction in Es-
pecial Relation to Women's Prob-
lems." The lecture will be given in
Hill auditorium under the auspices
of. the Women's league. Miss Fraser
is returning to Ann Arbor by the
special request of those who were
unable to hear her when she spoke
here last year.
Miss Fraser is an official of the
National War Savings committee of
the British treasury. She is especial-
ly well known for her work in wom-
en's problems and is the author of
the book "Women and War Work."
While in Washington last year she
was received by President Wilson in
the White House as the first official
Birtish woman to come to America
since the entry of the United States
into the war, and her advice was
sought by heads of many departments
in Washington.
She has just returned to America
from England for her second tour of
this country. During the past year
she has visited the American lines
in France and brings with her vivid
impressions of the work of American
and British women in the trenches,
as well as in England. The latest
information of schemes for social and
industrial reconstruction in Great
Britain will be presented by Miss
Fraser in her lecture here. Although
the lecture will touch primarily on
women's problems, it will also be of
interest to men.
RED CROSS CAMPAIGN
NETS HUGE MEMBERSHIP

MARTH COOK TO TAKE
UPPEACLSS GIRLS ONLY

PLAN TO, SINK TEUTON.
SHIPS ANGERS LODGEt

I

SCHOLARSHIP AND GENERAL
TIVITY REQUIRED NEXT
YEAR

AC I

NAVAL OFFICERS THINKI
ADDITION OF VESSELS
GOOD TROPHIES

N]

EW

Next year when the great dining-
room of Martha Cook building rings
with the strains of "Where, 0 where,
are the verdant freshmen?" not a girl
will stand.
There will be no freshman girls in
Martha Cook after this year, for the
privilege of living in the big dormi-
tory is to be awarded hereafter to
upperclass girls who will be chosen
from the small houses around the
campus on a basis of scholarship and
campus activity.
This radical step has been taken
by the board of governors of the
building and the University adminis-
tration, after four years of experi-
menting with various methods of
choosing the fotunate women to live
in this most palatial of American dor-
mitories. It has been found that
taking freshmen in the order of ap-
plication has resulted in a group of
transients, for most of them pledge
to a sorority during the first week or
two of college and thereafter give it
their first allegiance, looking upon
Martha Cook building more or less in
the light of a convenient hotel in
which to spend their first year, as
they cannot enter the sorority house
until they become sophomores.
To Raise Living Standards
The idea of the donors was to con-
fer the greatest good on the greatest
number of University women and it
now seems that this can be done
through the medium of upperclass in-
dependent women who would not oth-
erwise get the experience of the com-
munity life which a dormitory or so-
rority offers. Most of these women
expect to teach, so it is also believed
that the year or two which they will
spend in residence in this beautiful
hall and the ideals which they will
gain from it and each other, will do
much toward helping them to raise
standards of living in the cities and
villages to which they will go out.
Must Earn Place in Dorm
All kinds of methods of choice, both
for new girls and among old ones,
have been tried at Martha Cook and
at Newberry residence. Drawing
lots, choice by outgoing senior wom-.
en, and choice by the board of gov-
ernors are some of the plans used
at various times. These exepriments
have led to a feeling, which now ap-
pears in the practices of both hous-
es, that the girl who would live in
one of these buildings must show that
(Continued on Page Six)

(By Associated Press)

Washington, Dec. 19. - Press dis-
patches from Paris, saying that the
American peace delegates,,with Brit-
ish support, will urge the sinking of
the surrendered German warships as
the solution of the problem of their
disposition, lead to intimation of steps
today in the senate to obtain an of-
ficial statement of the facts and to
wide' discussion in naval circles. At
the state and navy departments no
information was available, Secretary
Daniels repeating his previous state-
ment that he had never heard the
suggestion officially; while at the
state department it was said that so
far as known there no, such project
was included in the American peace
program.
Lodge Where Mission Gets Authority
There were many indications today
that a proposal to sink the ships
would meet strong opposition in con-
gress. The Paris dispatch prompted
Senator Lodge to introduce a resolu-
tion calling on the state department
for information as to whether the
American delegates are advocating
destruction of the enemy ships and,
if so, by what authority. The resolu-
tion was left on the table without dis-
cussion and Senator Lodge may
touch upon the subject in an address,
he announced today, he would deliver,
in the senate Saturday.
Ships Built on Hun Theories
While the impression has been giv-
en that the navy department proba-
bly would not look with favor upon
sending the German ships to the bot-
tom some officers pointed to practi-
cal obstacles to absorption of the
vessels by the Allied and American
navies. They said that owing to dif-
ferences in design and equipment be-
tween the capital craft of the c-er-
man fleet and those of any other pow-
er their military value to the victors
is far from as great as might be
thought. The German ships were
built it was explained, on theories
that differ fundamentally from Brit-
ish, French, American, or Italian
ideas of naval construction.
Some officers were inclined to think
that the chief value of the majority
of the surrendered capital craft
would be as trophies of the victors,
to be pointed to as an object lesson
to any other power that might be-
come swelled with ambition for world
conquest.

v
e
f
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s

HOPGOESTO LITS,
COUNCIL DECIDES;1TO 11 01:
HOT CONTEST ENDED WITH 64
VOTE AT MEETING YES.
TERDAY
OTHER CLASSES DEMAND
TURN AT CHAIRMANSHIP
Council Not Representative, With
Many Members Still to
Service
Karl H. Velde, '20, is chairman of
the 1919 J-hop. At the meeting of
the Student Council last evening in
the old Michigan building, the junior
lits received the decision over the en-
gineers by a vote of six to four, which
makes valid the appointment of Velde
by the literary class at a meeting sev-
eral weeks ago.
Calls Present Scheme TN*fair
Several unexpected developments
took place at this meeting, concern-
ing the appointing of the J-hop chair-
man and these developments i part
decided the votes of several of the
councilmenk It was proposed that
the present system of allowing the
running of the committee to alter-
nate betweeng the literary and engi-
neering college was not fair to the
other colleges on the campus. There
was a suggestion that each college
should have its turn and to decide
the order of the colleges all should
be put in a hat, and the order of run-
ning the hop would depend on the
way in which the names of the col-
leges were drawn. This was con-
tested, but a motion was passed
"that the Student coun cishould go
on record as being dissatisfied with
the present method of choosing the
chairman of the J-hop and desires
that some other method more fair to
the juniors of the other five colleges
be adopted in future years."
To Be Put Up to Student Body
The final decision will probably be
left to the campus at large. The
mebers of the council desire to sound
out public opinion concerning this
matter before going further. It was
debated at the meeting last evening
whether the council was within its
rights to take up such a matter, but
the concensus' of opinion seemed to
indicate that it was.
Bell Makes Motion
The motion which gave the junior
literary class control of the coming
party, was made by Ferdinand C.
Bell, '19. "That the Student Council
has decided that the junior 1-its have
the better right of the two classes
and shall be given the chairmanship
of the J-hop this year," was the
proposition. The motion occasioned
considerable discussion, and the fac-
tion that desired the revolving of the
leadership of the party between the
various colleges, was in a great
measure opposed to its wording. They
objected to the " * * shall be given
the chairmanship of the J-hop this
year," part of the proposition. Sev-
eral of the members of the profession-
al colleges desired the present year
to be the beginning of the new
regime.

200 WORKERS BRING
THREE THOUSAND
MEMBERS

IN OVER
NEW

t
T
r
E
r
f

The Red Cross campaign which is
being carried on in this city has re-
sulted in bringing in a great number
of members, according to Mr. Charles
E. Kyer, chairman of the campaign.
The 200 workers who are canvassing
(he city have obtained about 3,000
members in the last two days. All of
those who are soliciting have not been
heard from and consequently these
figures are incomplete.
As all those who have reported
have brought in from 30 to 60 sub-
scriptions each, the total will prob-
ably be swelled greatly when the
remainder are heard from. The final
reports will be made Saturday night.
"Although we have tried to reach
every house in the city," said Mr.
Kyer, "we have been unable to reach
everyone and there are probably some
houses which we did not visit. These
people may subscribe by calling at
the Red Cross rooms at 608 East
Williams street.
"We have had few refusals to join
and I feel sure that the percentage
of members here in Ann Arbor will
be exceedingly high," he continued.
HOLIDAY SPIRIT
AT GIRLS" PARTY
A Christmas party where the spirit
of mirth and kindliness held full
sway, was given last night by the
girls of Newberry residence. The
board of governors of the dormitory
were the guests of honor. The dining
room was aglow with candle light.
The most distinguishing feature of
the evening was a play of the old
English kind with St. George and
various knights. Old and yet ever-
new carols were interspersed during
the evening. At the close of the par-
ty appropriate Christmas presents
were distributed to everybody and the
whole company was transformed in-
to a crowd of children reveling to
their hearts' content in whistles, en-
gines, rattles, dolls, and toy animals.
AIR SERVICE BETWEEN LON-
DON AND PARIS MADE SURE
London, Dec. 19. - Tickets are
now being sold at $75 each for jour-
neys-by-aeroplanes to Paris, passen-
ger service starting as soon as cir-
cumstances permit. The journey by
air will be done in two and one-half
hours, the distance being 240 miles.
Allowing a half hour at either end
of the journey to get to and from the
aerodromes the entire journey will
require but three and one-half hours.

May Elect New Members
The council at the present time is
composed of 11 members because of
the a'bsence of many of the men who
were elected to this body last spring.
Of this number Clifford S. Zylstra,
'19E was absent. It is believed pos-
sible by several of the councilmen
that provision will be made to remedy
the deficiency in the number of the
councilmen at the present time. Be-
cause the war has called away the
representatives of 'several of the
classes, has been decided as no rea-
son, why those classes should con-
tinue to be represented in this Uni-
versity body. It is probable that each
of the unrepresented classes will be
called upon to elect a temporary
council to act until the man elected
last spring returns to school.
St. Andrew's Church to Give Pageant
A Christmas carol-pageant, "The
Star of the Nations," will be given
in St. Andrew's church Sunday after-
noon as part of the annual carol serv-
ice of the church school. During the
action of the pageant, the choir and
congregation will sing carols and
hymns, both traditional and modern.

CHRISTMAS SERVICE[
Presbyterian Church
LEONARD A. BARETT, SPEAKS
MISS NORA HUNT and ROBT. McCANDLISS-SING
STUDENTS REMAINING IN ANN ARBOR DURING VACATION
CORDIALLY INVITED
NEXT SUNDAY, 10:30 A. 3i.

r

I service about a year.

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