100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 17, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

------

uri Y
OFFICIAL NFWSPAPER AT TH
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published, every morning except Mondayt
durg the university year by the Board in
Coutrol of Student Publications.
MaEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESSf
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
so the use for republication of all news dis-a
patches credited to it or not otnerwise credited
an, this'Asper and also the local news pub-S
lished heein.r
Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
Mehigan, as econd class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $.o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. s
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414. 1
Communications not to exceed 300 words,a
,' Asigned, thae signature not aeessarily to ap-c
par in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
4otices of events will be published in The t
a iy at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at o!r mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no1
considration. No manuscript will be re-1
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
'The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
Midr d C. Mighell.......Managing Editorf
Hrd Makinson..........usiness Managert
Charles R. Osius, Jr...........City Edtora
Marguerite Clark.............Night Edior
James C. J., Martin......elegraph Edi.w
Joseph A. Bernstein........Sport Editor
Viet H. Riorden......Military Editor
Martha Guernsey..........Women's Editor
Mark K.LEhbert............Associate Editor
Helen I. Davis .........Lterary Editor
LeGrand A. Gaines....Advertising Manager
Agnes L. Abele........Publication Manager
".onald M. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS .
David Landis Paul G. Webert
Horace W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey E. D. linterann
REPORTERSt
Margaret Christie Herman Lustfield
IreneElis B owen Schumacher
Xdna Apel Henry O'Brien
Marie Croie R~naud~ Sherwood
Mary D . Lane Marie Thorpe
M. D. Vincent
BUSINESS STAFI,
Mark B. Covell Robert E. McKean
Edward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva R. Welsh Wm. A. Leitzinger
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1918.
Issue Editor-E. D. Flinternn l
THE OPERA.
The Union and Mimes have shown
the good old Michigan pluck in decid-
ing to tackle that considerable un-
dertaking, the Michigan Union opera.{
Their enterprise and courage in the1
face of the present difficult situation is
a challenge to the energetic talent of
the rest of the campus and every lat-
et bit of it should appear when tie
call comes for tryouts. At present
without committees,director, books,
lyrics, or music, and 'with the date ol
production only three short months
away, months broken by vacation and
examinations and reconstructive ac-
tivity of every kind, this year's opera,
if a finished product, willpresent re-
markably hard and fast work. And
it cannot help but be a success if the
campus takes hold of the problems
connected with it in the spirit which.
denies the possibility of failure, in-
stead of sitting back, as has unfortun-
ately too often been done in the past,
expecting "somebody" to put on the
show, and planning to do nothing it-
sielf more arduous than first-night
criticism.
The decision not to ask the women
to take part was a wise move and is
certain to be approved by the major-
ity of the student body, both men and
women. As the production of organ-
izations whose membership is limited
to men students,' the participation of
the women last year was a good deal
of an anomaly. That the opera ,was
not a complete failure was probably
due to their willingness and that of
the men to overlook this fact and by
united efforts, do the best that could
be done under war conditions. The
spirit of co-operation which the wo
men then showed is recognized by the
me, and this fact should prevent any

feeling of resentment among the wo-
men this year. Their continuance
in future operas w*Old mean a change
in the character and eventually in the
management of the show, and as yet at
least, there is practically no sentiment
among either men, women, or faculty,
for a University, rather than a Union,
opera.
The only excuse for calling to the
women for help this winter would be
the failure of the men to support the
opera-work for it, write for it, and
try out for it-and this will not hap-
pen. Michigan is coming back strong,
in every way, and this "come-back"
warmth and verve can make the '19
opera one of the best in years.
GOETZ, CAPTAIN
Angus Goetz has been elected cap-
tain of the 1919 football team. Every
Michigan man is glad that he got the
honor. He is a credit to a Michigan
that has had many creditable student
since 1837, the year it was foundei.
He is of the highest Michigan type; le
gives everything there is in him to
any cause with which he is identified.
He upholds the best campus tradi-
tions.
When Coach Yost started to build a
team this year on the wreck that the
war had left of his old machine, Angus
Goetz became his mainstay. Goetz, an
upperclassman, obeyed every rule and

worked hard all the time. There were
many freshmen on the team; freshmen
who did noble work for the Univer-
sity and the team, and earned for
themselves the gratitude of Michigan
men.
But who knows how much the in-
fluence of Goetz, considering himself
amenable to all rules, however irk-
some, helped to make the freshmen
realize their responsibilities? Who
knows how often other members of
the team, tempted to weaken in the
strenuous training season with long
lapses between games,- were encour-
aged to stand strong by the influence
of the big, brilliant, uncomplaining
tackle? '
He is a man who will inspire the
1919 team by his devotion to duty.
His 1918 record proves that.
"After all," observes the faithful
follower of Maurie, "it would appear
that girls cannot beat the men, even
as female imitators."
The number of men out for basket-
ball seems to indicate that the Univer-
sity finds enjoyment in the record of
last season.
Mexicans fire on U. S. sailors; lose
battle.-Headline. Experience some-
times seems a poor teacher.
Most of the gobs are now sorry that
they preferred blue to khaki.
Red Cross Seals
for Mrembers OnlyI
Red Cross Christmas seals will not
be placed on sale this year. For a
number of years it has been a cus-
tom among us to put these little stick-
ers of the American Red Cross 'on all
our holiday letters and packages. The
money raised from this source every
Christmas time has been turned over
to the Anti-tuberculosis association.
Recently the Red Cross contributed
$250,000 to this society.
The only way in which the seals
can be obtained this year is to an-
swer to the "roll call" membership
campaign of the American Red Cross,
which will begin on Wednesday, Dec.
18, in Ann Arbor. The Red Cross
will give a booklet of stamps to each
purchaser of a membership.
LESS YULE-TIDE CELEBRATION
AT MARTHA COOK THIS YEAR
Martha Cook building cannot have
its annual Christmas breakfast this
year on account of this new outbreak
of the grippe. This is usually one
of the biggest events of the year and
-one in which nearly all of the women
of the University participate. The
girls in other years have assembled
in the upper hall and marched down
through the other corridors carry-
ing burning candles, and singing the
most beautiful of all songs, the old-
fashioned carols. Although the girls
will have some sort of :a celeration
this year, a great deal of the former
spirit will be lacking owing to the
house's decision to have no guests.
WAR TIME FURNITURE TO BE
TAKEN FROM LANE HALL SOON
All the war time furniture whicl
has been placed in Lane hall dur-
ing the war in order to make it serve
more as a "Y" hut will be removed
within the next day or two and the
former and more luxurious furnish-
ings will be replaced
Monday night a party was given

for the officers of the S. A. T. C. when
they were entertained at dinner and
a program of movies and stunts aft-
erwards Tomorrow night will be
navy night when the whole naval unit
will be invited to attend a get-togeth-
er with a seven reel movie as the
feature.
EARL G. KILLEEN SUCCESSFUL
DIRECTING COMMUNITY MUSIC
Earl G. Killeen, a graduate and
former member of the faculty of the
University School of Music and of late
director of music at Coe college, Ce-
dar Rapids, Iowa, is now in charge
of community music at Akron, Ohio,
where he is meeting with great suc-
cess. In addition to organizing chor-
uses among the employes of the great
industrial concerns there, he has done
much in the way of providing music
for the general community.
. of K. Offers Reconstruction Courses
University of Kansas offers two new
war courses. "The Economics of the
War," is offered as a three hour course
a.,d "Labor Problems of the Recon-
struct on Period," is offered as a two
hour coijr-e.
University of indiana is offering a
Food Nutrition course next term to
take the place of the former war
' foods course.

PHONE COMPANY TO
ASK HIGHER RATES
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Dec. 17. - The Michigan
State Telephone company is planning
to file a report to the railroad com-
mission of the state asking for high-1
er rates all over the state except inI
Detroit, it was learned today. Offi-,
cials ask that an early hearing be
given the report, that the new sched-
ule may be put into effect at once.
Independent companies, it is said, will
follow the example of the Bell sys-
tem in asking for the increase.
. Employes of the companies have
organized to demand a new wage
scale, similar to th" raise given the
electricians in Detroit.
The stand of the commission is
unknown, but it is intimated that ex-
isting schedules will be continued un-
til conditions are normal again.

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are re-
ported today by the commanding gen-
eral of the American Expeditionary
Forces: Killed in action, 134; died of
wounds, 49; died of accident and oth-
er causes, 7; died of airplane acci-
dent, 1; died of disease, 126; wound-
ed severely, 1,122; wounded, degree
undetermined, 229; wounded slightly,
507; missing in action, 200. Total,
2,375.-
The following casualties were re-
ported yesterday by the commanding
general of the American Expedition-
ary Forces: Killed in action, 155;
wounded severely, 1,020; missing in
action, 133. Total 328.
John N. Kapeleris of 109 S. Main
street, Ann Arbor, was listed among
the privates severely wounded.
CHiRISTMAS SPIRIT TO REIGN
AT Y. W. C. A. VESPER SERVICES
Christmas spirit will be the keynote
of the vesper services to be held at 4
o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Dr.
Lloyd Douglas will deliver a message
of Christmas cheer and the Univer-
sity Girls' Glee club will sing Christ-
mas carols. The aim of the Y. W.
C. A. in holding this service is to
instill Yuletide spirit into University
women before they return to their
homes. All girls are cordially invited
to be present.
ICHI A N MAN, SPECIALIST ON
FPIDEMICS, SENT TO GERMANY
Captain Paul De Kruif of the bac-
teriology department, has been sent
to Germany, according to a letter re-
ceived by his family recently. Cap-
tain De Kruif is epidemiologist in the
third division, his duties being to take
charge of any epidemics which may
break out. His duties since he en-
listed at the first of the year have
kept him near the front line most of

The regular meeting of the Women's
Glee club will be held at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.
The last hygiene lecture of the year
for freshman girls and entering
sophomores will be given at 5 o'clock
this afternoon at Barbour gymnas-
ium.
Senior basketball practice will be
held at 5 o'clock this afternoon. Jun-
iors who wish to do so may come.
A meeting of the Y. W. C. A. cabinet
will be held at 3:30 o'clock Wednes-
day afternoon.
HOSTESS HOUSE TO
CONTINUE DUTIES
There will be no hostess in charge
at the Hostess house beginning to-
day since there has been very little
need of one during the past week as
so many men have been leaving for
home. Mr. Leroy Pattison, curator of
Alumni Memorial hall, will be in i
charge of the work for the remainder
of the week, according to the presi-
dent of the local chapter of the
Women's Collegiate Alumnae associa-
tion.
Nothing else will be changed at
the Hostess house until Christmas va-
cation has begun. Writing materials
will continue to be provided for the
soldiers. The furniture, which was
donated by various fraternities, will
not be moved until sometime during
vacation. Anyone desiring to locate a
man may call on the Hostess house for
the desired information, as the lists
have been left intact for Mr. Patti-
son's convenience.
1'. of Northwestern to have It. 0. T. C
The regents at Northwestern have
decided to establish an R. U. T. C.
regulated by the war department. Mil-
itary training will be required of all
underclassmen except those who have
commissions or have already spent
sometime in the service. One hour's
credit will be given for this course.
They also concluded not to give any
examinations this term.
PRE-CHRISTMAS SALE
C -
Our entire stock of Winter Hats
will be closed out regardless
of cost.
Stevens & Pershing
618 Packard

MICHIGAN

It is better this year than ever before and the price
ONLY 50C

HRSS

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

QUARRY'S..
FOR
PRACTICAL GIFTS
________FOR -
PRACTICAL PEOPLE
Ivory ToiletArticles,LeatherG oods,Boston Bags
Crane's and Gilbert's Chocolates
Cigars and Cigarettes
Quarry Drug 'Cos
Prescription Store
COR. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE 308

When you go home
Take with you a

CALENDAR

e'

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES
..in- AT ~
S HEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

Magazine Subscriptions
for XMAS GIFTS
STOFFLET'S Newsstand

I

Try our HOME-MADE
-CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St,

.

usl - rl lps e r "

A

REGULAR

: SHOE

U. of Kansas Nay Have If 0. T. C.
University of Kansas strongly fav-
ors an R. 0. T. C. for which about
1,370 students signed the petition. The
final decision will be made before the
first of the year and sent to the war
department.
For service and results try a Daily
Want Ad.-Adv.
SPORTING',GOODS
CAMPING OUTFITS
Hunting Coats, Caps, Sweaters,
Rubber Boots, Ponchos, Rain-
coats, Gloves, Leggings, Sheep
Skin Coats, Mess Kits, Camp
Furniture, Tents, Cots, Blankets
and everything you need. Hun-
dreds of other articles.

rd Ma .P M.e
Cordovan For Men

I'

U
II

I

An All Cordovan, Top and Bottom, all sizes
Stock a genuine extra fine shell, plump and pliable, extra heavy oak sole
for winter wear. Color a dark rich shade brown.
Toe a medium English, new military Pattern.
Price $10-Most Reasonable-Quality Considered
Walk-Over Boot Shop
115 S. Main St.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Blween Detroit, Ann Arbot and Jackson
(October 27, 19:8)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:10 a.
im., and hourly to 9:1o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. in. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. im., and
every two hours to 9:05 p. m., to:50 p. n.
To Ypsilanti only, :45 p. rn., 12:20 a. M.,
r:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--7:48 a. m., to
12:20 a. in.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

I

FOR XMAS PRESENTS
Many acceptable gifts for your
soldier friend in service; or as
a present to your officer instruc-
tors in charge of S. A. T. C.

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00

Write for Catalog

37 West 125th St., New York City

I

Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
70? North University Ave.

" i

Jewelry

- - -

- - Calendars
- Scrap Books

O D MORRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting
Mimeographing

Leather Goods

We have a variety of gifts and we are always glad to offer suggestions
Stusdenlts' SupplyStore

Phone 11 60-R

I 1 11 S. University

a

A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan