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December 17, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-17

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
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L. XXIX. No. 66.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1918.

PRICE THREE CENTS

I _ _ _1Ir

W

COM-PANY 17ITO GD
AS SOON AS lt RK
IS ALL COMPLETED
MEN ON SICK LIST WHEN POST
IS ABANDONED TO GO TO
FT. WAYNE
NO INSTRUCTIONS YET
ON OFFICERS' RELEASE
Remaining Men Eat in' Union Build-
ing; Temporary Mess Hall
May Be Torn Down

GOBS' PAY CHECKS
COME YESTERDAY
All men in the naval unit were paid
yesterday afternoon for their services
up to December first. The amounts
varied greatly, some receiving only
$20 while others got as high ts $80.
They will be paid the remainder of
their money when they are released
from active duty which -will be about
the 21st of this month. There is small
possibility that any of the men will be
released before that date.
number were operated on for tonsils
Each man paid for his uniform out
of his $100 uniform allowance so the
men are allowed to keep them; how-
ever, they are only supposed to wear
them for one month after they are dis-
charged. .
Only a few cases of illness mar the
unit's fine health record. After the
examination held last week a small
number were operated on for diseased
tonsils and adenoids.
TO AID0 RETURNED-
MEN TO GET WORK
Coming of New Men to City May Prove
Serious Handicap to Returned
Detroiters
_
CONCERNS PROMISE OLD JOBS
TO MEN TAKEN BY DRAFT

'BURLESON IN FAVOR OF
NATION WIRE CONTROL
GOVERNMENT CAN GET SYSTEMS
BY APPLYING TO 25 YEAR
AMORTIZATION FUND
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 6.-Ownership
by the government of the telephone
and telegraph systems of the nation
was characterized as "imperative"
by Postmaster General Burleson to-
day in a letter to. Representative
Moon, chairman of the house commit-
tee on postoffices and post roads.
Mr. Burleson said the system can
be acquired "without the appropria-

1-HOP TO COME BACKM
FRATERNITIES PLAN HOUSE PAR.
TIES FOR THE SPRING
VACATION
Plans are underway to make the
1919 J-hop a fitting event to re-estab-
lish the many traditions temporarily
suspended because of the war. Al-
though the junior engineers have not
yet organized a committee to work
with the 1920 lit committee, compos-
ed of Carl Velde, chairman; Harry
Hause, John Perrin, David Nash and
David Landis will be chosen some
time this week.
During Spring Vacation
The junior literary class has voted
to hold the big prom this year dur-
ing spring vacation because of the
short time left before the end of the
first semester. This time has met
with the approval of the faculty, who
are heartily in favor of the dance. It
is likely that there will be no oppo-
sition from the engineers to this date.
Whether it will be the first week end
of the vacation or the last has not yet
been decided, and will depend largely
upon the arrangements foil a place
to hold the hop.
Some slight controversy has been
going on as to which class, the kits
or engineers, will take the lead, inI
planning the dance, but as the engi-
neers put on the 1917 J-hop it is
likely that the present party will be
controlled by the literary class.

With only company 17 now remain-
ing in the S. FA. T. C., composed of
non-dismissed men from practically
all the other companies, the number
of dismissals from the army here has
fallen from four to five hundred a day
to only four or five. Qompany 17 now
cormists of 127 men, four of the men
being transferred yesterday to Fort
Wayne at Detroit. There are ate pre-
sent 14 men on the sick list, the com-
plaints being for the most part gen-
eral disabilities with no cases of in-
fluenza reported. If these sick men
are not in first class shape when the
post here is abandoned, they will be
transferred to Fort Wayne Detroit.
Co. 17 to Go Soon
The rest of these men will be dis-
charged from here as soon as the nec-
essity for their services is over in a
matter of clerical work and also in
fixing up buildings. Some are being
held to aid the quartermaster in
checking out the rifles and uniforms.
The uniforms which the discharg-
ed men wvill be allowed to. wear for
four months are all to be returned to
the quartermaster's headquarters in
Chicago. The uniforms here in stock
will be sent there immediately. The
rifles will be sent to the Rock Island
Arsenal, Illinois.
Men Eating at Union
The temporary mess hall at the
south of the Union has been abandon-
ed and the men of company 17 are
now eating on the second floor of the
new Union building. Orders in regard
to removing or leaving the mess hall
and other temporary buildings on the
campus are expected to arrive in the
next few days.
Officers Still Here
.The 51 officers who are still station-
ed in Ann Arbor are still busy on the
work of checking up the discharge
papers of all the men who have been
released thus far. This work will
probably occupy two or three days
more. Nq orders have been received
yet at headquarters as to the dismissal
of the officers.
Major Ralph H. Durkee stated that
he did not know when he would be
discharged. He said that he would
not be transferred to the regular army
but would await his discharge which
he expects as soon as the district of-
ficer at Chicago judges that he post
here is closed. He did not state what
his plans are for returning to civil
life.

RE-REGISTRATION
PROGRESSES BETTER
Re-enrollment in all colleges of the
University progressed more rapidly
yesterday than any day previous, ac-
cording to those placed in charge of
the work. Although many of the men
who were recently discharged from
the S. A. T. C. have re-enrolled and
payed their fees for the balance Nof
the academic year, there still remain
a large number yet to report.
As the civilian men students are
practically finished with their second
enrollment, only those in the naval
unit together with ,those in the S. A.
T. C. who failed thus far to register,
prevent the University officials from
determining the total enrollment of
this year's students.
For the convenience of the men not
yet re-registered, the following has
been made out: In the literary col-
lege the students should enroll at the
registrar's office in University hall;
engineers, in ,room 263 Engineering
building; medics, in secretary's office,
Medical building; laws, secretary's of-
fice, Law building; pharmics, room
362 Chemistry building; homeops,
dean's office, Homoeopathic medical
building; dents, secretary's office,
Dental building; graduates, room 9,
University hall.
BELIEVES THAT FIFTH
LOAN WILLSO OVER TOP
"PEOPLE MUST REALIZE THE
GREAT NEED OF FUNDS,"
SAYS SCHWEPPE

tion of a dollar from the public treas-
ury" by applying to amortization fund
-or 25 years, the savings made under
government ownership through elim-
ination of duplications in plants and
operating expenses.
As justification of the permanent
taking over of the wires systems, Mr.
Burleson said:
"To establish a maintained means
of communication is as much the
function of the government as is the
provision of national defense. More-
over it is essential to the development
of the country and to' the progress
and prosperity of its people. It is the
defense of .the national interests as
much in peace as in war. Extension
of the wire service should be deter-
mined by public needs, not the op-
portunity for private gain."
The postmaster general said that
he believed that an effective plan
could be worked out by which the
waste of competition could be elimin-
ated and that the advantages of pri-
vate research work, investigation and
experimentation not be lost.
LANE HALL OPEN
TO NAVY THISWEEK

WILSON WILL EAT
CHRISTMAS MEAL
ON HUN TERRITORY
PARIS PRESENTS U. S. HEAD WITH
GOLD MEDAL AT END OF
ADDRESS
PRESIDENT 'TO VISIT
MARSHAL FOCH TODAY
American Peace Commission Organiz-
es; Conference to Assemble at
Versailles Monday
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Dec. 16.- President Wilson
will leave Paris Christmas eve and go
to American general headquarters.
From headquarters he will proceed'to
the American front. He - will have
Christmas dinner with the American
troops and not with the American'
commander-in-chief or other officers.
(From the above it would seem evid-
ent that it is the purpose of President'
Wilson to have' Christmas dinner on
German territory in the region of Cob-
lenz with the American forces of occu-
pation.)
President and Wife Receive Gifts
Paris, Dec. 16.-President Wilson at
the conclusion of his address at the
city hall today in reply to the greet-
ings of Adrien Mithouard, the Presi-
dent of the Municipal council of Par-
is, was presented with the great gold
medal of the city of Paris: To Mrs.
Wilson was presented a diamond
broach adorned with an enameled
dove. -
President Wilson will leave Paris
in an automobile tomorrow to visit
the principal points along the old
fighting front, notably the battle of
the Marne.
The President passed the early fore-
noon indoors today reading a large
number of letters. He then started by
automobile for a visit to Versailles,
where the final meeting of the peace
conference will be held. The Presi-
dent was accompanied by Mrs. Wil-
son.

Finding work for discharged De-
troit soldiers without putting out of
employment the men who have held
the jobs whilehthe soldiers were away
is the difficult task in which Ser-
geant-major Alfred If'scher, of the,
local S. A. T. C. regiment, will en-
gage when he receives his discharge
from the army. He returned to Ann
Aimor yesterday froma furlough in,
Detroit, where he has been studying
the problem with John A. Russell,
secretary and treasurer of the Detroit
Board of Commerce.
New Men to Be Problem
"It is a big problem but we will be
able to handle it if the men do not
return in too great numbers and if.
large numbers of new men do not
come to Detroit in search of work,"
Sergeant-major Fischer stated.
"The latter is the thing we fear,"
he went on. "Detroit has been over-
advertised and there are great num-
bers of men from other parts of the
country who think that a person can
almost pick up gold in the streets."
OpportunIties Overrated
"A letter which typifies the idea was
received by Mr. Russell a few days
ago. A soldier in a certain , camp
wrote that his bunkie had told him of
the wonderful opportunities in De-
troit and that he had decided to come
there after being discharged. W~e said
that he would like a position as em-
ployment manager of some large in-
dustrial concern, preferably Ford's,
and that he would be willing to start
in at a salary of $9,000 per year. The
letter was written in perfectly good
faith.

This week is navy week at the army
"Y." Last night a dinner was served
to 11 navy officers at Lane hall. All
these officers have a local rating of
chief petty officers.
Wednesday night the whole person-
nel of the navy will be entertained at
Newberry, where a Paramount picture
will be shown, entitled the "Guilt of.
Silence." This will be the last event
at Newberry. After that the hall will
be closed, the water drawn off, and the
shades pulled down.
It is not probable that the Y. W. C.
A. will move back into its last year's
quarters, as Dean Myra B. Jordan is
desirous of keeping the two organiza-
tions for women together in Barbour
gymnasium for this year at least. The
business of moving would moreover,
be inadvisable so soon after the Y. W.
C. A. had been established in its new
position. The camp furniture from
Lane hall will doubtless be stored in
Newberry as soon as it is replaced by
the furniture which was supplied for
Lane hall when it was new.
DRAFT BOARDS TO
SOLVE PROBLEMS

May Re Held in New Union
If the Union is completed sufficient-
ly to allow the hop to be held there,
it is likely that Waterman gymna-
sium will no longer be the site of the
party. Although no definite word
could be given concerning the possi-
bility of the completion, a meeting of
Alumni will be held during Christ-
mas vacation to attempt to form plans
to go ahead with the remaining work.
If the present plans carry through it
is likely that all will be in readiness
by spring vacation for the Union to
accommodatq the dance. If "┬░not, the
present dance hall of the old build-
ing would be large enough for only
200 or 250 couples and would not be
large enough to hold a regular hop
crowd. In this case Waterman gym-
nasium would again be used.
The party will probably be formal
as in former years as it is the object
of the juniors to have the coming
party resemble as closely as possible
the J-hops of past winters. To re-
mind the returning soldiers of the
school which they left is the desire of
the lit committee and nothing will be
left undone to obtain the proper re-
sult.
All the fraternities are arranging
to hold house parties at this time and
many are planning already to make
their individual parties as large as
those of other years.
With the election of the engineer-
ing committee and the deciding of
who will have the priority in the
management of the hop,k all of these
things which have not yet been ar-
ranged will be decided in a short
time.
PROF, HOLLISTER'S CLASS
GIVES RECITAL OF WAR POEMS
The classes in interpretive reading
under the direction of Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister will give a recital of mis-
cellaneous poems, including recent
war poems, tonight at 8 o'clock in
room 205 Mason hall.
The following students will take
part: B. H. Vinghurst, Mary Over-
man, Theda Palmer, Susan Verlenden,
Blanche Howell, Harriet Towsley, Wi-
nona Beckley, Alice Geniesse, Hilda
Hagerty, Eva Herzberg, Louise Kre-
ger, Adele Tappan, and Evadne
Wright. The program will last about
an hour, and those interested are in-
vited to attend.

WILSON WANTS TEACHERS' NA-
TIONAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU
Washington, Dec. 16. - President
Wilson requested the establishment of
a national employment bureau for
school teachers and the same' has
been accordingly established in
Washington by the commissioner of
education. The object of the estab-
lishment of this agency is to insure
against non-employment of all those
who qualified tp teach in the public
schoQg."
It has been found that 5,000 places
which should be held by teachers are
slow vacant throughout the country
and that 120,000 persons are now
teaching who have uever taught a
class before. When the bureau is iii
full -orling system, this pondition
will be considerably relieved.
ATTENTION! NAVY MEN!
The United War drive pledges
from the navy are now due and
are payable at Lane *hall, or by
mail to I. Leo Sharfman, Lane
hall. It is the wish of the com-
mittee that the men pay their
pledges as soon as possible. .

Positions for Drafted Men
"The 68,000 drafted men who have
left Detroit will have little trouble in
finding employment as practically all
employers have promised them their
old places upon their return. It is the
men who took their places that will
(Continued on Page Six)

Chicago, Dec. 16. - Charles H.
Schweppe, federal reserve director of
the seventh district Liberty Loan or-
ganization, believes that the coming
fifth Liberty Loan will be'floated with-
out difficulty, if the public can be
made to understand that the govern-
ment needs a large amount of mon-
ey in order to pay the victory bills.
A vast amount of money will be need-
ed to bring back the' conquering
troops and to clean up the tremen-
dous job of saving freedom for the.
world.
Same Organization
The official statement says, "In the
seventh district we will probably use
the same organization as before, and
I think that we can count on each
and every Liberty Loan worker to
help us out."
As to the kind .of bond, he says
that he feels that a short term bond,
say, five years, at a high rate of in-
terest, exempt only from the normal
income tax would be more attractive
than one with a lower rate of inter-
est and exempt from all taxes.
Army Must Be Maintained
"People should fully realize," he
says, "that the United States is still
maintaining a large army of occupa-
tion in Europe, and during the period
of reconstruction will have large ex-
penditures to make.
I believe that the seventh district
had the largest numberoftsubscrib-
ers of any federal district in the
fourth: loan, numbering about 4,300,-
000. To continue this very creditable
record will be a distinct feather in
,our cap, and I believe the seventh
district can do it."
BRITISH INFANTRY
REACHES COLOGNE
(By Associated Press)
Cologne, Dec. 13.-(Delayed).-The
final phase of the occupation of Ger-
man territory by the British army,
as specified by the armistice, was be-
ing worked out today.
Three divisions of infantry made
formal entry into Cologne this morn-
ing and crossed the great bridies
over the Rhine to follow the cavalry
over the semi-circular line, which is
being established about the bridge-
head.
General Plummer, the British com-
mander, was here to review the
troops. It was raining heavily as the
men passed through here.
Notwithstanding the downpour,
thousands of civilians lined the routes
of march and stood patiently under
umbrellas in order to see the British'
soldiers. The crowds showed no hos-
tility.

(By Associated Press)
Annapolis, Id., Dec. 16.-

Thirty-

"FRAT" HOUSES TO
BE OCCUPIED SOON
The work of repairing the fraternityj
houses is wel under way and it is
expected that many of the fraternities
will move in a week or two so as to be
be fully re-established after the
Christmas holidays. -
The repairs at present consist en-
tirely of refinishing the floors and of
tearing out the temporary plumbing
which was put in when the houses
were used as barracks. The Phi Delta
Theta house and the Phi Kappa Sigma
hcuiiFe will be finisheq by the end of
the w:k. It is planned to finish the
SigmiIon Alpha Epsilon house in a week
or so. ,
The me:, ar e also working on the
Alpha Delta Phi and tha Phi Sigma
Kappa houses.
Although nothing definite is known
as to the total expense it i' estimated
that an average of $200 apiece will be
spent on the houses. The U'niversity
will in every way try to leave them in
as gopd a conditioii as they were be-
fore ther use as barracks.

six state governors, or governors el-
ect, in annual conference here today
were told by Secretary of War Baker
that the war had proven the indispen-
sibility of strong state governments
in peace as well as in war times, as
the principle agencies of mobilizing
and demobilizing armies, finding work
for returning soldiers, and developing
better methods of physical training
for young men, At the same time he
pleaded that state authorities give
cities more freedom to work out their
individual local problems.
Early disbandment of the draft
boards and state branches of the
council of national defense as federal
agencies and advocated by the secre-
tray, who urged, however, that both
remain in existence informally to aid
local authorities in solving problems
of the re-adjustment period.
Secretary of Agriculture Houston,
addressing the governors, suggested
that state gover-nment ascertain im-
mediately .what farming lands might
be available for use of returning
soldiers. He cautioned, however,
against throwing these mnen on farms
indiscriminately without previous ex-
perience or adequate training.

Wilson to Visit Chateau Thierry
Paris Dec. 16.- President Wilson
will proceed tomorrow to Sennis,
Marshal Foch's headquarters, to con-
fer with the Allied commander. Lat-
er he will visit the battlefield at
Chateau Thierry, where the first Am-
erican divisions distinguished them-
selves, and also Rheims.
During the intervals between of-
ficial calls and visits today the Pres-
ident was engaged in affairs of state,
much in the manner of his procedure
in the White House at Washington.
Mission's Work to be Made Public
President Wilson has been insist-
ing that the American peace mission
organize its machinery so that the
people of the United States can begin
to know what is happening. Mean-
while the mission is trying to get it-
self settled so as to begin prelimin-
ary work.
Joseph Grew, former counsel of the
American embassy in Vienna, will take
(Continued prom Page One)
Trial to Reveal
Terrible Secrets
The trial of State vs. John Doe,
which has been set for 7 o'clock to-
night, and will be held in the Adel-
phi rooms on the fourth floor of Uni-
versity hall, promises to assume
greater proportions than 'any similar
case.
A number of University celebrities
already have become involved in a
maze of scandals, and there will be
some .rare disclosures at the trial.
The prosecuting attorney will open
the casewith an astonishing revela-
tion of the life of the defendant, who
is treasurer of the organization. The
disclosure will prove to court wit-
nesses that he has been living a dual
life-testimony brings to light that
he has feminine admirers in Ann Ar-
bor as well as in Ypsilanti,
K. Guilfoil, '20L, clerk of the Adel-
phi house of representatives, will be
one of the main figure-heads in the
trial.
Visitors at the trial will have an
opportunity to serve on the jury and
partake of the refreshments promised
by the court.

Germany Accepts Solf's Resignation
Berne, Dec. 16.-A dispatch receiv-
ed here from Berlin says that the
resignation of Doctor Solf as impe-
rial secretary of foreign affairs has
been ccepted,
Jack Dempsey Knocks Out Carl Morris
New Orleans, Dec. 16.-Jack Demp-
sey, of Utah, claimant of the heavy-
weight championship, knocked out
Carl Morris, of Oklahoma, in the first
round of their scheduled 20-round
bout here tonight after one minute
of fighting.

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