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December 17, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-12-17

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la. THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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6OETZ HEADS 119
WNOLVERINE EEVEN
Player's Ability to Block Punts and
Capture Fumbles Wins Him
captaincy Position
NEXT YEAR'S GRID FANS
TO WITNESS STAR LINEUP
Angus Goetz, '19, left tackle of
Yost's war-time 1918 football eleven,
was elected captain Sunday morning,
of next year's varsity grid team, when
the letter men assembled at a local
studio to have the official picture
taken.
Goetz's ability to block punts and
capture fumbled balls won him the
captaincy of the Michigan football
team for 1919.
Of the 18 votes cast, 12 of the play-
ers voted for Goetz, three for Cohn,
and three for Fortune,
Goetz Earns Two "M's"
This is the second time that the
De Tour, Michigan, man won his "M"
and with the coveted honor practical-
ly assured for next year, the Maize
and Blue player will have three "M's"
to his record before he leaves the Un-
iversity.
The new captain elect fell on
fumbled balls, two of which, were the
result of his Docking punts in the
Ohio State, Chicago, and Michigan
Aggie games, and each time he scored
a touchdown on them. His touch-
down in the Buckeye contest helped
to pave the way for the undefeated
record of the Wolverines this year.
Goetz was chosen by Walter Ecker-
sall in his all-Conference eleven, and
received many praises, from Coach
Fielding H. Yost.
Captain to Enter lAw School
The new Maize and Blue captain
will be a graduate from the literary
college this summer, and since he has
won his new position it is likely that
he will enter the Law school next fall.
When the 1919 grid season opens,
football fans will see a strong Wol-
verine team, for a number of the old
pigskin stars will be back in the line-
up, and will be under the leadership
of Goetz, who has more than once
demonstrated his ability to think in a
football contest.
Pick-Ups
The University of Chicago basket-
ball began the season by defeating the
Lake Forest five by a 29-15 score.
Stegeman and Hinkle starred for the
Maroons.
It is probable that the Missouri Val-
ley conference will take an action in
the near future similar to the one tak-
en by the Big Ten in making this year
a blank yeir in athletics, which allows
* freshmen who played this year to play
three years more.
The first scrimmage of the year for
the University of Kansas basketball
team took place last Thursday when
the team met for a short session.
Guy Sundt was' chosen captain of
the Wisconsin eleven for next year.
With only 12 men out for basket-
ball, of whom two were on the varsity
squad last year, the prospects of the
Oberlin team are in doubt.
The basketball game scheduled be-
tween Wisconsin and Beloit for last

Saturday was called off on account of
the flu ban at Madison.
ILLINOIS ELEVEN ELECTS
W. C. KOPP TO PILOT TEAM
Fullback W. C. Kopp, of Chicago,
will captain the. Illinois football teamj
that will face Michigan on Ferry field
in 1919. He was elected at the an-
nual football dinner held Saturday.
This is Kopp's second year on the
Sucker varsity. He caught on the
baseball team that Michigan defeated
twice last spring, and won a letter
in basketball.
Cornell Selects Rice for Crew Leader
Jim Rice, rowing coach at Columbia,
is reported to have agreed to accept
the position of captaincy at Cornell.
He will succeed "Pop" Courtney, un-
der whose guidance the Ithaca crews
have for years swept the Hudson.
Courtney's health forced his retire-

CO. G WINS NAVAL
UNIT CHAMPIONSHIP
Company G won the naval unit
championship last night by defeating
Co. D by a score of 29-23.
SThe game started at 7:45 o'clock
in the city Y. M. C. A. gymnasium. The
game was marked by poor team work
on the part of both organizations.
The basket throwing was bad, and did
not come up to the regular style pre-
viously shown by the two quintets.
Heffe and Kiftler scored most of the
points for Co. D, while the stars of
the conquered team were Berghoff and
Betro.
The lineup was as follows:
Co. G Position Co. D
Welhoelten.....L.G.........Gray
Eroegindewey . .. R.G...... Wienderg
Ensel .... .......C...... Don Rassen
Berghdff.... ...L.F......... Kiftler
Soitier........R.F..........Heffe
Substitutions: Co. G.- Betro for
Soitier; Co. D. - Adind for Kiftler;
Weaver for Heffe; Heffe for Weaver.
Referee-Vick.
MICHIGAN TO PLAY
RAYLS JANUARY 6
Members of the Wolverine quintet
have been billed to meet the Rayle
state champion independent basket-
ball team on Jan. 6 at Detroit.
The six day schedule will start on
Dec. 27, when the state champions
meet the Ohio State men at Detroit.
,Following the Buckeye game the
Maize and Blue basketeers will clash
with ,the team, which should be one
of the best of the season, for the Var-
sity has plenty of material, and will
give the strong teams in the Confer-
ence strong opposition.
The six-game schedule follows:
Dec. 27.-Ohio State at Detroit.
Jan. 6.-Michigan at Detroit.
Jan. 13.-Drayton Triangles at De-
troit.
Jan. 20.-EmRoes, of Indianapolis,
at Detroit.
Jan. 31.-Great Lakes Naval Train-
ing Station at Detroit.
Feb. 3.-St. Mary's college at De-
troit.
STUDENTS REMAINING FOR
XMAS TO BE ENTERTAINED
For those who are not so fortunate
as to be able to go home for Christ-
mas vacation, the different organiza-
tions of the city will try to offer en-
tertainment and cheer. The Univer-
sity Y. M. C. A. will have several
get-togethersat Lane hall. The mov-
ies which have been held twice a
week will be continued throughout
the holidyas and two other parties are
being' planned in addition.
A social for the foreign students
will be given by the Methodist church
with several other Christmas events
also.
The theaters will of course continue
for the 17 day vacation and dances
will be held on both Christmas and
New Year's Eve. Many of the towns-
people will entertain the students in
their homes.
ALPENA TURNS CLOCKS AHEAD;
HAS SAME TIME AS DETROIT
Alepena Dec. 17. - The city of Al-
pena this morning set its clocks and
watches one hour ahead to eastern
standard time, and now is, w-th De-
troit, numbered among the fe Mich-
igan towns that adhere to the old day-
light saving plan put into effect by
order of congress last spring for the
entire country during the summer
months.

Alpena's . workers will now go to
their labor an hour ahead of the rest
of the state, excepting those of De-
troit and the few other towns that
have taken similar action, and they
will conclude their work an hour ear-
lier in the evening, giving them more
time for play and pleasure.
PEACE NEGOTIATIONS COURSE
ELECTED BY LARGE NUMBER
Prof. Robert T. Crane's new course
in peace negotiactions held its first
meeting at 3 o'clock yesterday after-
noon. The professor stated that the
general plan of work would be to
study what the basis of peace nego-
tiations have been in settling former
wars and to discuss what the
basis of the forthcoming negotiations
should be.
Approximately 100 men and only
six women have elected the course
and because of the large number, the
class will meet hereafter in room 101.

TWO VASITY VETRAN
APPEAR FOR PRCTIE
FIRST GAME TO TAKE PLACE AT
DETROIT WITH RAYL'S
STATE CHAMPS
"Prospects for this year's Varsity
basketball are certainly brightening,";
said Coach Mitchell last night.
One look at the squad justifies the
statement. The attendance last night
was unusually good and a scrappy
tussle between the Varsity squad and
the freshmen was the main attrac-
tion on the program.
Up to this time the S. A. T. C. de-
mobilization and innoculation has in-
terrupted practice, and has knocked
out all plans to such an extent that
many wondered if real work would
ever start. But fans have the coach's
word that the big season has finally
commenced in earnest, and that Michi-
gan can look forward to a team that
will wipe out to some extent last
year's record.
Richener and Cress Are New Men
Perhaps one of the reas'ons for the
coach's statement is the admission of
two knew men to the squad. Philip
Richener, last year's running guard,
and Elmer Cress have arrived in Ann
Arbor and have signed up for prac-
tice. Richener was an "M" man last
season. Hewlitt and Richener will
be the only veterans on the quintet
this winter.
Richener started the season last
fall as forward, but was later chang-
ed to guard, where he displayed a
great deal of brilliancy.
Cress Sub on 1918 Team
Cress was a substitute last year and
played in only one Varsity game, but
his experience has a great value. He
has possibilties, both as a guard and
center. Critics believe that this man
will give Cohn a run for the position
of center. This is Cohn's first year
out for the basketball team, and so
far he has had no serious competi-
tor, but Cress' appearance will proba-
bly change matters a trifle.
Coach Mitchell says that he hopes
that Waterman gymnasium will be in
shape soon so that if the squad is
called back the latter part of the
Christmas holiday season work can be
started there
tFreshnmen to Practice in January
No freshmen practice will be held
with the present gymnasium facili-
ties, as the large number of freshmen,
who are at present trying out for the
squad, cannot be handled with ease
in the Ann Arbor High school gym-
nasium.
The Maize and Blue quintet will
have a hard schedule beside the one
planned with the Conference teams.
The Rayl state champions will clash
with the Wolverines at Detroit on
Jan. 6, and the University of Detroit
and Kazoo Normal will play Michigan
on Jan. 18 and 19.
BELGIUM MORE UNITED AFTER
GERMANY'S EXPLOITATIONS
Bruges, Dec. 16. - The one time
German governor of Belgium, Von
Bissing, rendered Belgium a sign-
al service by endeavoring to exploit
his plan of splitting the country into
two parts by his scheme of Flemish
autonomy. Judged from present in-
dications it has united Belgium as
never before in its history. Before the
war here was a well defined Flemish
movement but when Von Bissing at-
tempted to exploit it the Flemish de-
murred, for they feared the German

bearing gifts.
The number of disciples converted
to the policy by Von Bissing is small.
Adventurers, discontented office seek-
ers and for the most part youths, they
are no longer in position to champion
the designs of Von Bissing for they
have taken refuge in Germany or Hol-
land where it is likely they will spend
years of exile.
LOIS JOHNSTON WINS FAVOR
IN DETROIT MUSICAL CIRCLES
Miss Lois Johnston of Detroit, who
has been a student at the School of
Music under Mr. Theodore Harrison
for the past three years, has recently
created quite a furore among Detroit
musical circles. Sunday she appear-
ed as soloist with the Detroit Sym-
phony orchestra and made a profound
impression. Her reputation as a
singer is now firmly established.
Patronize our advertisers.-Adv.

New, Feature At
Faculty Concert
Community singing, led by Mr.
Theodore Harrison, featured the pro-
gram of the concert given,under the
auspices of the University School of
Music last Sunday afternoon, in Hill
auditorium. The concert was given
in co-operation with the War Camp
Community 1ecreation service and
was attended by an unusually large
audience.
Among the features on the pro-
gram was a solo of "There's a Long,
Long Trail" by Robert R. Dieterle,
'21M, and a group of negro spiritual
songs by Mr. James Hamilton.
The audience were so enthusiastic
and the concert so successful that
another is being planned to be given
some time between Christmas and the
new year.
PROF. WHITNEY IS
SUB-STATION HEAD
Prof. A. S. Whitney has been ap-
pointed, by commissioner of educa-
tion P. P. Claxton, director of the
sub-station of education to be estab-
lished here. Other collaborators have
not yet been named.
The latter will be appointed as spe-
cial collaborators. There will be a lim-
ited number of members of the staff of
the University at the nominal pay of
$1 per annum. Such appointments
will carry with them the privilege of
'using the stationery and frank of the
bureau. All investigations that are
undertaken by the members of the
sub-station in the name of the Bureau
of Education must be submitted to
and receive the approval of the com-
missioner. All questionnaires and
other material which it is proposed
to send out under the frank of the
bureau must be submitted to the bu-
reau for approval.
Professor Whitney expresses him-
self as being enthusiastic on the es-
tablishment of the sub-station here
as it will greatly further scientific
investigation in education.
Kee p posted -- subscribe for the
Daily, now $3.00.-Adv.
Pattonize our aavertisers.-Adv.

JEWISH STUDENTS SEND WIRE
TO PHILADELPHIA CONGRESS
About 30 students assembled at Lane
hall last Sunday to send congratula-
tions to the first Jewish congress
which opened in Philadelphia Sun-
day, the same day, at 1:30 o'clock.
The meeting opened with a talk on
the movement of congress, how it had
been originated, and the purpose of
it. Also a graphic description of the
atrocities which are being committed
against the Jews in Poland at the
present time was given.
The following telegram was sent:
"Jewish students in assembly at the
University of Michigan send their
heartiest congratulations to the first
Jewish congress, with sincere wishes
for success. We urge the congress to
take up the Polish question and prose-
cute it to the fullest extent."
Christmas vacation at Oberlin will
start Dec. 20 and end Jan. 2.

JAPANESE MINISTER FAI
PLAN OF LEAGUE OF

Tokio, Dec. 16. - Belief that
League of Nations ,will be achiev
was expressed by Baron Takahasb
the Japanese Minister for Finance
a dinner given by the Bankers' cli
given in honor of 'the new Japane
cabinet.
The minister called attention to t
activities of American financiers
prepare for the post-war peri
"thus conforming to their splend
national developcent," and urged Ja
anese business and financial men
work out a plan of co-operation whi
would advance Japan's Interests.
Maroons Win A. A. U. Champlonsl
The Maroon basketball team is ra
idly getting into condition. Long,
the court team, also won a place
last Saturday's five mile cross cou
try race at Chicago. Chicago won t
Central A. A. U. champaionship, Tu
Campbell taking first in 27:27.

S. A T. Ce

Don't Forget Your Company Picture
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Students of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
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CHRISTMAS
HANDKERCH IEFS
Colored linen handkerchiefs in rose, blue,
and grey
35c each
Novelty handkerchiefs of crepe de chine
in white, plain colors, and figured designs.
35c each
Swiss handkerchiefs, embroidered in col-
or, 3 in a box for
50 cents

WOOLEN SKATING GLOVES
make most acceptable gifts to the out-door girl. They come in shades of grey
and white, with long wrists.
$1.50 and $2.00
SMART HOLIDAY NECKWEAR
New monk and cowl collars, satin, Georgette crepe, and chiffon in chic effects.
$1.50 to $2.75
Satin vestees with high or low neck
$2.00
An attractive organdie monk collar is
65 cents
A filet lace collar and cuff set is
$1.25
VANITY CASES
A new shipment of these cases has just been received. Most of them have
colored enameled tops, and are priced from
75c to $1.25

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