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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1

-_----

R

FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UtJNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ilished every morning except Monday
rthe university yeartbythe Board in
bl of Student Publications.
:ER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
m credited to it or not otherwise credited
s paper and also the local news pub-
berein
ered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
)Pa'i as econd class matter.
iscriptionsby carrier or, mail, $3.5.
ces: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Ines: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
iounications not to exceed Soo words,
ied, the signature not necessarily to ap-
a print, but as an evidence of faith, and
a of events will be published in The
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
pa#led to the office.
Age communications will receive no
LeRition. No manuscript will be re-
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
Tents expressed in the communications.
d C. Mighell........Managing Editor
f3 Makinson.........Business Manager
s R. Osius, Jr...'...........City Editor
0erite Clark............Night Editor
C. J. Martin.......Telegraph Editor
A. Bernstein...........Sport Editor
lt- H. Riorden..........Military Editor
a Guernsey........Women's Editor
K. Ehbert..........Associate Editor
tnd A. Gaines...Advertising Manager
tL. Abele .......Publication Manager
d U. Major.......Circulation Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
"Landis Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter
REPbRTERS
Opel John Kyser
ret Christie Herman ustfield
Dailey Philip Ringer
Allis Bowen Schumacher
tains Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
Wm. A. Leitzinger
UNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1918.
sue Edtor-llorace W. Porter
EAST AND WEST
higan's defeat of Syracuse yes-
,y carries with it tar more sign-
ce that a mere victory over a
team. It means the probable
All championship of the United
1s, .
acuse has been considered by
Ie strongest team in the East.
equently its defeat on Ferry
yesterday means that Michigan
umhpltant over the best the 'East
>roduce. On the other hand, the
ty has shut out Chicago and has
lent promise of easily overcom-
,ny opposition future rivals may
p. There is no team in the Con-
Qe, it seems, that can stack up
.St the Maize and Blue. Why
d('t w expect the champion-
I this is not the only significance
rday's game had for Michigan. It
ed that there is no danger of our
ttlng the East because we are
ag in the Conference. Michigan
still keep on her schedules the
tvals, Cornell, JPennsylvania, and
use. There will be no "Back
s West" movement that will en-
obliterate the records Mich-
has made in th East. The Var-
dd fair to have plenty of oppor-
r to be the most talked of team
e East, as well as in the West,
iany years to come. Inter-see-
1,games will not be forgotten.
LL THEY WANT TO STAY?
s only thing the men in the S.
C. have been certain of and
to agree upon during this last
is that something must be
ed from the present situation,
hat soon. Some have hoped that
ould continue in the army, trust-
hat they might still see action
A, building roads in France even

job of opening them up to Ber-
as finished. Others have turn-
eir eyes back to the good things
e old days, realizing that with
uns silenced, the need of Am-
now is for trained citizenship.
while they have all waited and
ered and needless to say, work-
t over much.
lay's demobilization order from
ral March calls for the disband-
f all troops now in this country,
h we suppose includes the S. A.
The government will pursue
conomical course of using the
now overseas to carry on the re-
ruction work in devastated ter-
r -and send those at home back
eir former occupations.
e former occupation of most of
nen here was studying and train-
or positions in society which re-
d resourcefulness in the highest
. But many of the men in the
nt training corps would n 'r
come to the University in pe-e
. These men were, at the time
came here, making a living at
occupation which did not re-
this kind of training. They can
money at it, they know how to
and it is undoubtedly more at-
ive in an economic way than re-
ing in the University, which, if
government withdraws its sup-

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Cor. State and Wilia nSs.
10:30A.M.
LLOYD C. DOUGLAS
Preacheis on
"VICTORY"(
4:00 P. M.-
STUDENT SOCIAL HOUR W
J
Here is where a crucial test awaits
Michigan. Has the University, facul-
ty, and students made its purpose
and spirit felt in the minds of -these
men, making them realize that power
and happiness are won through a
knowledge of what other men have
thought, and do think, rather than
through a hold upon their material
needs? Has Michigan taught these
younger sons of hers the lesson which
none of her older ones ever left with-
out knowing, that training and ideals
are strength? If she has not, both
she and they are losers.
If you didn't hit that flag yester-
day at the game for your limit, the
only legitimate excuse is that bills
couldn't be thrown accurately. And
your only vindication is to get those
greenbacks into the War Work fund.
Our idea of a martyr is the fresh-
man who had to leave at the end of
the first half to go and peel potatoes.
You are fairly happy today, aren't
you? Remember the other Michigan
man in France and share up.
The medic-law football game was
remarkably like W. Hohenzollern's
Christmas dinner in Paris.
Hard up? Germany owes France
$68,000,000,000.
ARMY OF COLLEGE
WOMEN ORGANIZED
The Mobilized Army of University
women has been divided into eight
companies, each commanded by a
captain. The army is to run on a
strictly military basis, Major Flor-
ence Fields assures us, the captains
being under orders to submit monthly
reports to the acting adjutant, Rose
Sturmer, '20. Every girl in the Uni-
versity will be included in the army
of reconstruction and every girl will
be held responsible for a certain
amount of war work.
The following girls Are appointed
as captains: Company A, Jean Mc-
Clenan, '19; Company B, Marion
Ames, '20; Company C, Laura Dan-
iels, '19; Company D, Katherine
Loveland, '20; Company E. Margeurite
Adams, '19; Company F, Margeurite
McEntee, I19; Company G, Josephine
Rosenblum, '20; Company H, Cristine
Anabella, '20.
STUDENT COUNCIL PLANS TO
HOLD ELECTIONS NEXT WEE
Although it was announced by the
Student council after their meeting
last Friday that the various class elec-
tions would be held sometime this
week, the time for the elections has
not been set as yet. A committee was
appointed at that time to arrange the

schedule for the elections but they
have thus far taken no action.
A meeting of this committee will
probably be called for this afternoon
by the chairman, Sidney C. Zylstra,
'19E. The time for the elections will
be announced the first of next week.
Canadian Military Defaulters Go Free
In Canada military defaulters, men
who have defied the military authori-
ties and registrars of the military
service act, are immune from punish-
ment, according to military orders
received from the adjutant general at
Ottawa. No such orders have been
received by the military authorities
here. The war is still on as far as
military discipline goes; in the armies
of the United States.
French Scholars Sent to Universities
Two French soldiers are students
this year at Northwestern university.
Both are disabled from wounds re-
ceived on the western front. One
young French woman is also register-
ed there. These three students have
been sent by the French. government
to Northwestern in the same way that
Michigan's two young French women
have been sent here.
For service and results try a Daily
Want Ad.-Adv.

MASQUES TRYOUTS
TO BE HELD SOON
Tryouts for the annual play to be
presented by Masques later in the
year will be held at 4 o'clock Wednes-
day afternoon in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. These tryouts are open to
all University women interested in
play production.
The large number, who tried out
last year for the cast of "Amazons"
leads to the hope that many will be
interested this year in taking advan-
tage of the opportunity afforde in
Masques for dramatic training and
for the practical study of problems
connected with amateur play produc-
tion. It is planned this year to elect
to membership in Masques all girls
who, at the annual tryouts, give evi-
dence of dramatic ability, whether
they will give promise of making a
place in the annual play or not.
While the officers are not yet ready
to make definite announcements as
to the play to be produced it is
agreed that inasmuch as the presen-
tation of the "Amazons" was so suc-
cessful a venture in the field of Eng-
lish comedy, the organization shall
continue the policy of presenting each
year a play from that field.
Prof. J. Raleigh N. Nelson, perma-
nent faculty director of Masques, is
in correspondence with one of the best
known contemporary English play-
rights for permission to use a com-
edy which is recorded as one of his
masterpieces. Professor Nelson, who
will have charge of the activities of the
club thisyear, will direct the produc-
tion of the annual play. Those inter-
ested in Masques are anxious that all
women interested in play production
come to the tryouts Wednesday.
FRENCH SCHOLARS
ON LECTURE TOUR
Three members of the official mis-
sion of French scholars which is now
in the United States will visit the
University Nov. 26 and 27. A program,
which is now being arranged, will in-
clude a lecture to be given by each
member. These lectures will be given
in English and are intended to appeal
to the general public.
The American council on educa-
tion announces that, under the pa-
tronage of the French government,
and with the encouragement of the
government of the United States, this
mission, composed of some of the
leading scholars in France, arrived
in this country last week. The mis-
sion comes in response to specific and
repeated requests from several Amer-
ican institutions of learning to have
representative Fr.eich scholars in-
terpret for them the dominant ele-
ments of French culture, as a means
of binding France and America more
closely together in intellectual sym-
pathy.
The three members of the mission
who will come to the University are:
Dr. Theodore Reinach, editor of the
"Gazette des Beaux-Arts," lieutenant-
colonel in the French army, and con-
tributor of several important studies
to the History of Greece; Dr. Etienne
Burnet, of the Pasteur institute
(Paris), surgeon in the French army,
and research worker in the field of
philosophy, and Mr. Seymore de Ricci,
art critic and former editor of "Art
in Europe."
All the members of the mission will
be in the United States during De-
cember, and some will probably re-
main through January. They will de-
liver lectures before universities, col-
leges, learned societies, and other bod-

ies on different aspects of French civ-
ilization, according to the special-
ties of its several representatives.
New Epidemic Abates, Says Dr. Oiln
Lansing, Nov. 16.--Dr. R. N. Olin,
secretary of the state board of health,
announced tonight that the new out-
break of Spanish influenza was be-
gining to abate and that he consid-
ered the necessity of another closing
order remote. The handling of the
epidemic is being left entirely in the
hands of the local authorities. There
were 851 new cases reported today,
most of them in the upper peninsula.

" toIIICInI
The second of the series of compul-
sory hygiene lectures for freshmen
and entering sophomores will be given
at 4:;) o'clock on Iuesday. Girls will
be required to keep these lectures in
blue books.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will be at
home to University girls froze 3 to 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoon.
The class in advanced dancing will
begin at 3:30 o'clock Monday, and the
class in beginning dancing at 3:30
o'clock on Tuesday.
The first class in indoor military
marching will be held at 4:30 o'clock
on Monday afternoon.
The annual hockey supper for girls
who made the first and sub teams will
be held this afternoon at Forestry
fari. Girls are to be at the station
in time to take the 4:48 interurban.
All girls who are planning to elect
basket ball are to meet in Barbour
gymnasium at 4 o'clock on Tuesday
afternoon.
If there are any girls who have not
s(.cured their locker assignments, they
wut do so immediately.
United Lutheran Church Incorporated
New York, Nov. 15.-- The United
Lutheran church in America, an amal-
gamation of three Lutheran bodies,
was incorporated here today. More
than 100,000 delegates from this
country and Canada ratified the meas-
ure.

AT WAHR'S
Waidron' s Company
O ind eneal for
Soldiers and Sailors

o
g
TsyQk .
IS

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL
SUNDAY DINNER 12:15 to 1:45
Cream of Tomao Soup Chicken and Biscuit
Mashed Potatoes - Sweet Potatoes Southern Style
Cranberry Jelly
Fruit Salad
Chocolate Ice Cream Cake
Coffee - Tea - Milk
Pricey 75 Cents Bath Men and Women
tn

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

w"-f"""" AT 'mw....r

S HEEHANKS E
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

UNITARIAN CHURCH
STATE AND HURON STREETS
SUNDAY SCHOOL AT 10:30
MRS. W. B. FORD will address the Young People's Religious Union
at 4 o'clock in the afternoon.

Please note the change of hour from 6:30 to 4.

Havfe a H one"
Dorit eat COwD TOAST'
when you can make
HOT TOAST
- -
Hon your able

VXI

THE ANSWER
Billiards Ind Bowling
HUSTON BRCS.
"We try to Treat You Right"

DELICIOUS TOAST
Hot, Crisp and Golden-Brown

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbot and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:lo a.
m., and hourly to 9:1o p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. 1n. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
LocalCars East Bound-6 :oo a. in., and
every two hours to 9:0O5 p. mn., 10 :50 p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. n., 12:20 a. m.,
1:1o a. in., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. in., to
12a:2o a. in.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. M.
Phone 1020-R

M, I

from the

ELECTRIC RADIANT TOASTER
You cannot imagine the. delicious qua-
lity of a slice of toast made by electricity
right on the table and served hot and crisp
and appetizing.
Use an electric radiant toaster and
make your evening feeds the event of the
day.

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

French Mission to Be Here Thursday
The French mission is expected in
Ann Arbor Thursday and Friday of
this week. As a result, the date for
the Vocational conference may have
to be changed. Students are urged
to watch the Daily for a notice of the
change for it is important that no
one should lose the opportunity of
hearing Dr. Peterson or Miss Marion
Peterson speak on the advantages of
nursing.
Entrain for 0. T. C. at Eleventh Hour
Seventy S. A. T. C. men from the
University of Illinois entrained for
officers' training camps scarcely 24
hours before peace was declared.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to everycustom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bankt
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources..........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MORRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickels Arcade Phone 1718
First Floor -

The Detroit Edison Company

William and Main Sts.

Ann Arbor

i

F

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