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November 17, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-17

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY IRAN
AND COPLER

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ASSOCIATI
PRESS,
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

-

VOL. XXIX. No. 41.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1918.

PRICE THREE

GERMANS LOOT CIVILIAN PROPERTIES;
WILSON CONFERS MEDA9LON PERSHING;
U.S. ARMY MOVES TOWARDS BERLIN

ENTENTE ARMIES TO ADVANCE
AT RATE OF TEN MLES
EACH DAY
YANKEES WIN PRAISE
FROM ALLIED OFFICERS
Balloons to Escort Troops on Way;
Engineers to Clear Roads and
Construct Bridges
(By the Associated Press)
With the American forces in France,
Nov. 16 (5 P. M.).-Great quantities
of civilian property are being carried
away by retiring Germans, according
to Lieut. M. K. Lockwood, and Lieut.
D. C. Bede, of the 50th aerial squad-
ron, who returned to the American
front today after being prisoners in
the hands of the Germans for 10 days.
The aviators were shot down Nov. 4
In the region of Tennay and were re-
leased by the Germans on Thursday.
With the American army in east-
ern France, Nov. 16. - The distin-
guished service medal was conferred
upon General Pershing at his head-
quarters today by Gen. Tasker H.
Bliss, representing President Wilson.
The ceremony was witnessed by the
mnembers of the Allied missions, and
was most impressive.-
With the American ofres in France,
Nov. 16.--The American army will -be-
gin to move toward Germany at 5:30
o'clock Sunday morning. The army
will travel about 12 miles each day.
U. S. Army Heads Other Forces
To the army just organized has
fallen the honor of heading the first
big unit of the Allied occupational
forces. The advance will be made in
columns and not in the order of bat-
tle, so long followed. It is not for-
gotten, technically at least, there is
still a state of war. Nothing will be
left to chance and every precaution
will be taken to guard against sur-
prises.
Care will be taken to have t e forc-
es well echeloned. The advance
guard, well in advance of the main
force, will be followed by engineers,
who have been instructed, not only
to repair roads,reconstruct bridges,
and clear the way in general, but to
inspect keenly every object that might
be a trap. Mines will be sought care-
fully, and, if found, exploded. The
tGermans have sent word that the way
is opened and the mines removed, ex-
cept in cases designated. Water al-
so will be inspected carefully and
none of it permitted to be used until
pronounced pure.
Army to Be Well Supported-
Divisions moving on the front will
have others to support it and the
flanks will be carefully supported. In
addition, long lines of ;observation
balloons will be up behind the lines
and they, too, will be moving slowly
forward, observing the movements of
the retreating Germans. The aviators,
however, will have little to do. They
will move up somewhat later, unless
an unexpected break comes, in which
case they, too, will be ready for im-
mediate action.
The advancing Americans will be
flanked by the armies of France and
by Sunday evening it is expected that
the advanced elements of the Amer-
icans will cross the Belgium border.
The fifth French army on the left,
and the tenth French army on the

right, will advance abreast the Amer-
icans, while far along the line to the
left and right the Allied troops will
continue to advance along the lines
agreed upon.
Wonderfully rested by the few days
of inactivity, and their pride touch-
ed upon by the honor conferred upon
them, the American army, awaiting
eagerly to advance Saturday night,
seasoned by hard fighting, and school-
ed by discipline, won the praise of
the officers who looked them over in
the afternoon.

MICHIGAN NINTH
ON COLLEGE LIST
BULLETIN
New York, Nov. 16. - With only
$108,405,408 on hand toward its re-
vised goal of $250,000,000 officials of
the United War Work campaign
announced tonight that the drive
scheduled to end Monday night would
be continued until Wednesday night.
Eleven states have passed their
quotas.
War Work subscriptions at Mich-
igan are still far below the records set
by other universities. Practically ev-
ery college and university in the
country has surpassed Michigan in
the amount given per capita.
Almost $400 was thrown on the
flags passed around Ferry field yester-
day. This sum has been turned over
to Treasurer Robert A. Campbell of
the University to be counted and de-
posited in the banks. This was con-
sidered a fair amount by the commit-
tee, but it is far from encouraging
when the $40,000 quota is considered.
The students have not responded
with even a reasonable amount of
spirit, according to the geperal chair-
man.
President Harry B. Hutchins said
of the campaign: "The object is a
most worthy one and the University
of Michigan must not be behind in
making contributions. The work of
the organizations for the support of
which, this fund is being raised will
be even more important during the
period of demobilization than during
the active period of the war." Presi-
dent Hutchins expressed the hope
that the students of the University
will contribute to the extent of their
ability.
Iowa leads the central states' uni-
versities with a total of $57,529; Illi-
nois has $45,014; Missouri, $32,949;
Wisconsin, $24,350; Albion, $2,091;
Alma, $1,477; Adrian, $477; Kalama-
zoo college, $1,500; Kalamazoo Nor-
mal, $4,000; M. A. C., $5,000; Olivet,
$1,415. Michigan has subscribed
only $10,866 of its $40,000 quota. The
University ranks ninth in the central
states.
WILL 'DEMOBILIZE
200,000 MEN AT ONCE
Washington, Nov. 16.-Gradual de-
mobilization of all troops in the Unit-
ed States has been ordered, accord-
ing to announcement made by Gen-
eral March today. He stated that
there are within the country 1,790,-
000 armed men at present; 200,000
f these will be demobilized immedi-
ately and will probably reach their
homes during the next two weeks.
Development battalions will be de-
mobilized first. Then conscientious
objectors not under arrest, spruce
production division, central training
schools for officers, with some modi-
fications, United States guards, rail-
way units, depot brigades, replace-
ment pnits, and combat divisions will
follow in the order named. It is ex-
pected that 30,000 men per day will
be released from service.
Sending of additional troops to Eu-
rope, with the exception of surgical
units, will be stopped. The order in
which divisions already in France
will be demobilized will be left to the
discretion of General Pershing.
Naval Unit Attends Game in Uniform
The naval unit formed yesterday at

Shall We Let The World Say That
Mlichigan Campus hies Slackers?
Michigan leads the colleges of the United States in men in the
army.
Michigan is the slacker college of the United States in the
amount it has contributed to the United War Work campaign.
The shame of it is not secret; it is nothing that Michigan men
and women can keep locked up in their own breasts. It is a matter
of record in the big central offices of the national campaigners. It
is commented upon at Minnesota and Chicago; at Yale and Cornell.
Michigan made up its mind to have a football team despite war
and influenza and today it has the best football team in the United
States.
When Michigan has the will to do a thing, it does it. Michigan
apparently has not the will to be decent to the men making Michigan
safe.
Michigan should wipe out the record of its slacking with substan-
tial contributions. The duty is squarely on each student. There is
no excuse.

MICHIGAN ELEVEN HUMBLES SYRACUSI
GRID TEAM BY 15-0 SCORE, STEKETI
WINNING GAME FOR MAlZE AND 81

NUNS SEEK LENIENCY
THROUGH FOOD PPEAS
CENTRAL POWERS MUST PAY FOR
ALL FOOD SENT BY
ENTENTE
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 16.-In the almost
historical aplpeals of (the German
provisional government for supplies
of food and for permission to address
itself directly through a commission
to the American public, officials see
a purpose to excite the sympathies
of a large element of the American
population, more or less connected by
blood ties with Germany. With such
sympathies aroused, the German gov-
ernment, it was said, undoubtedly
hopes to influence the approaching-
peace conference toward leniency.
Such appeals as those which have
been sent by wireless by Doctor Solf,
German foreign secretary, to Secre-
tary Lansing were said to be quite
unnecessary and not likely to have
any beneficial results. President Wil-
son already has promised to do ev-
erything possible to prevent suffering
-among the civil population of the suf-
fering states.
Sufficient Food in Germany
The Entente powers have endorsed
his attitude, not so much from consid-
erations of mercy or sympathy with
the foe, as from a genuine conviction
that a starving and desperate people
would make dangerous neighbors, ren-
der any satisfactory peace impossible,
and by appeals to the international
spirit endanger the spirit of the En-
tente countries themselves.
It is known officially that there is
sufficient food in Germany to meet
immediate needs. The supreme war
council plans to supply food in the
future, and before the present stocks
are exhausted, assuming the exercise
of wide economy of food distribution.
'Therefore it is said that it is quite
unnecessary to send the proposed
commission to the United States to
arrange for the purchase of food. Mr.
Hoover and the agencies behind him
will attend to all of that.->
Food Must Be Paid For
To correct what appears to be a
general public misunderstanding on
the subject it may be authoritatively
stated that none of this food to be
sent from America to Germany or
Austria is to be given away. It must
be paid for by the governments of
these countries.
Michigan Dames to Hold First Meeting
Michigan Dames will hold their first
regular meeting this year at Alumni
hall, at 7:45 o'clock, Monday even-
ing. Al students' wives ands ladies
whose husbands are connected with
the military or naval units are asked
to attend.

AMEICAN PRIMA ONNA
SCORES GREAT SUCCESS
BIG CROWD ATTENDS CONCERT
IN HILL AUDITORIUM LAST
NIGHT
(By Edna L. Apel.)
Anna Case, prima donna soprano of
the Metropolitan Opera company,
proved what purely American train-
ing and coaching could produce when
she sang last evening in Hill audi-
torium before an audience unusual in
the history of Ann Arbor concerts on
account of the large number of army
and navy men in evidence. The vo-
ciferous applause and the number of
'encores showed the unqualified favor
of those present.
, Perfect Enuheiation Features
Miss Case sang with perfect diction
in English, French and Italian. It
was possible to enjoy the unusual
experience of understanding every
syllable. Shepossesses a voice of ex-
quisite beauty, which is especially
rich and pure in the middle register.
Feats of vocal agility were performed
which were astonishing. Her sustain-
ing power and tone connection be-
tween high and low notes was excel-
lently rendered. The high notes were
clear but often the pitch was untrue.
Only through perfect breath control
was her rare phrasing and masterly
style of interpretation made possible.
French Numbers Popular
Bemberg's 'II Neige," "Dans Ropte
Felen" by Soderman and the Leon-
cavallo "Serenade" were encored many
times. The Aria "Depus le Jour"
from Louise by Charpentier was sung
with beautiful legato and pianissimo
effects. The variety of atmosphere
with which Miss Case surrounded
these sincerely felt and melodious
lyrics was a manifestationof imag-
inative power coupled with a large
command of artistic resource.
Mr. Spross' accompanying was
-free from affectation and manner-
isms. He displays a brilliancy of
technic and sincere musicianship.
"Robin, Robin, Sing Me a Song" was
written by Mr. Spross and dedicated
to Miss Case. At the Public library
in New York, recently, Miss Case auc-
tioned the song for $5,000 a copy for
the Liberty Loan campaign.
The "Star Spangled Banner," in a
lively dendition, brought the program
to a close.
THE DAILY WANTS TRYOUTS
Tryouts are wanted for bus-
iness and editorial staffs of The
Michigan Daily. Chances are ex-
cellent for promotion. Apply at
the Press building on Maynard
street in the afternoon.

Victory Bulletins
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 16.-In compliance
with the terms of the armistice .the
German forces in East Africa, under
Gen. Lettow Vordeck surrendered on
Nov. 14 on the Chembezi river, south
of Kassama. This official announce-
ment was made tonight.
Amsterdam, Nov. 16.-The new Ger-
man government, according to a dis-
patch from Berlin, has telegraphed
to the secretary of the navy, to see
that complete discipline is observed
in the German fleet. The telegram
concluded: "We will only get peace
if we loyally fulfill the conditions of
the armistice."
Paris, Nov. 16.-Marshal Foch, com-
mander-in-chief, has addressed the
following message to the Allied arm-
ies:
"You have won the greatest battle
in history and saved the most sacred
cause-the liberty of the world. Be
proud. You have adorned your flags
with immortal glory. Posterity re-
serves for you its recognition."
GOMPERS DISLIKES
LOW WAGE PLANS
(By the Associated Press)
Laredo, Tex., Nov. j16. - Samuel
Gompers, president of the American
federation of labor, in the closing
hours of the Pan-American Labor
Conference here today, served formal
warning that no reduction of wages
or increase of working hours would
be accepted without a bitter fight by
organized labor.
Mr. Gompers issued a statement
inspired by a recent public utter-
ance" of William H. Barr, president
of the National Founder's association,
that a reduction of wages and longer
hours would be the only means to
enable American manufacturers to
continue to cope with foreign indus-
tries after the war.
"Notice is given here and now," Mr.
Gompers, said, "that the American
people will not be forced back by
either Barr, his association, or all
their Bourbons In the United States."
M. A. C. DEFEATS NOTRE DAME
AT EAST LANSING; SCORE 13-7
(By the Associated Press)
East Lansing, Nov. 16. - The re-
nowned Notre Dame team lost to the
Michigan Aggies on College field this
afternoon by a score of 13 to 7. The
game was staged in a sea of mud,
with the rain coming down in sheets
for the greater part of the playing
period.
As far as the Aggies were concern-
ed it was a battle without stars, the
backfield and line working together
with perfection.
Today's victory evens M. A. C.'s
score with Notre Dame, for M. A. C.
won in 1910, while Notre Dame achiev-
ed victories in 191 and 1917.
The success of the Aggies places
them on a par with the Maize and
Blue eleven, for the Notre Dame vic-
tory over the Great Lakes team made
them one of the most powerful mid-
dle west elevens.
MONTHLY MEETING WOMEN'S
LEAGUE ADVISORY BOARD

Women's league advisory board held
its monthly meeting yesterday in
Barbour gymnasium. Caroline Davis,
'19, was elected junior representative
to the board. A report from the so-
cial chairman stated that girls in-
terested in social service work should
apply to Florabelle Ellis, '20, and that
a number of girls were needed to
teach dancing to some town girls
Tuesday nights at the Ann Arbor high
school. Those interested in making
comfort kits for the soldiers should
so inform Florence Field, '20.,

YOSTMEN PLAY BRILLIANT F
BALL, WITH EVERY MAi
A STAR
VICK IS WOLVERINES
STAR ON DEFENS
Coach Yost Gives PracticallyI
Man on Squad a Chance in Fi
When Safe Lead Is Assured
Steketee's toe brought victo:
the Maize and Blue at Ferry fiel
terday afternoon when Coach I
football men met and defeates
strong Syracuse eleven, hun
them by a score of 15-0.
The contest was filled with
fight than has been seen on
field in a long time. The e
squad, almost assured of \the
before they went into the,.
thought that they would have
snap with the Michigan Varsit
after the first few minutes of the
test, they settled down and beg
fight.
Steketee a Star
Sensational playing on the pi
the freshman fullback feature
game, yet the wonderful suppr
en him by the other wearers (
Maize and Blue speaks well for <
Yost's ability as a football coach.
men like Cohn, Goetz, Karpus, P
and Knode to help in the off
work, the toe artist could as
nothing better, while for defe
work, Vick acquitted himself 1
veteran rather than as a freshn
Despite the fact that therc
was played in a downpour of rat
Varsity men of both teams di
falter once. Despite the fact th
ball was slippery and the flie
in a bad condition, the game di
hold a single uninteresting mo
Beginning with the very first
off, it was a fight to the very end
Orangemen thought that they
have it easy with Coach Yost's g
made up chiefly of inexperienced
but when the latter started to ru
easterners off their feet, it bee
different story.
Syracuse resortedto kicking t
their end of the game, but in
Michigan outdid them. Steketee
was more accurate, better tr
and more powerful than Ackle;
Syracuse, and therefore the v
went to the Maize and Blue.
Kicking was the first
the Orangemen resorted to,
(Continued on Page Three:
SERVICE GAME WI
BE PLAYED TOE
Ann Arbor will have its fire
portunity to see a service fo
team in action this afternoon
the representative eleven of Co
4 will engage the sanitary corps
ball team from Pontiac, at Ferr
this afternoon.
With Young, one of the stai
the Maize and Blue in the Sy
contest yesterday, coaching the
pany 4 team, they appear to
great strength. A week ago the
Normal school at Ypsilanti fell
them, giving them a clean slat
start. The Pontiac team also c
a clear record.
Coach Mitchell, of the 'V
coaching squad, will officiate.
game will start promptly at
o'clock. The Ann Arbor tean
lineup as follows: Jones, l.e.;
en, L.t.; Walkotten, l.g.; Fide
Rochester, r.g.; Betzel, r.t.; King
Pfrommen, q.; Weisenger, r.h.;

can, l.h.; Phillip, f.b.
German Crews Sink Own S
Copenhagen, Nov. 16.-A large
ber of ships, demanded by the
under the terms of the anx
were sunk by their naval crew
cording to the Germania of Bea
Clause 30 of the armistice pr
that all merchant vessels in G
hands, belonging to the Allie(
associated powers, are to be re
in ports to be specified by the
and the United States.

I

I

a little after 1:15 o'clock and, head-
ed by their band, marched down to
Ferry field. Both companies were rep-
resented but only about half of the'
unit was there because nearly one-
half of each company was given leave.
Ali those who did not have leave or
work on special duty attended the
game. They all sat in one section of
the stand and made a very creditable
showing, a field of blue dotted regu-
larly with white hats. Their band,
seated in the front row, was given a
stiff competition by the army band,
in the next section, but honors were
evenly divided.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION
"T~hanksgiving"-10:30 a. m.
Prof. Rankin speaks to student class 11:45.
Young People's services 4 p. m. and 6:30 p. m.
The morning service will conclude in time for S. A. T. C. men to
go to dinner.

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