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November 10, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE MICHT

GAN DAILY

NEWSPAPER AT THE l
RSITY OF MICHIGAN
very morning except Monday
iversity year by the Board in
dent Publications.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
:ed Press is exclusively entitled
republication of all news dis-
d to it or not otherwise credited
and also the local news pub-i
the postoffice at Ann Arbor,I
econd class matter.
s by carrier or- mail, $3.50.
iArbor Press Building.
iness, 960; Editorial, 2414.
ions not to exceed 300 words,
signature not, necessarily to ap-
but a an evidence of faith, and
nts will be published in The
discretion of the Editor, if left
o the office.
ommnunications will receive no
No manuscript will be re-
the writer incloses postage.
oes not necessarily endorse the
pressed in the communications.
ighell.........Managing Editor
son..........Business Manager

CON
Cor

I
I

FIRST
ICREGATIONAL
CHURCH
State and William Sts. ;
10:30 A. M.
LOYD C. DOUGLAS
Preaches on
"DER TAG"
4:30 P. M._
UDENT SOCIAL HOUR

ALL COLLEGES AID
UNITED WAR WORK

s

L

MINNESOTA NURSES
ENROLLMENT LARGE

War workers are launching the I The University of Minnesota is
United War Work campaign in univer- doing much in helping to prepare
sities all over the country. The quota
of the University of Illinois is $50,000, women for war service. The Ameri-
that of the University of Chicago is can council of education requested
$25,000, and Oberlin, O., is raising $10,- that they assist to the full extent of
000 for the Big Seven and $12,000 for their ability. They respected this re-
other activities. ..'quest by making changes in their
At the University of Illinois the curriculum to such a degree that
amount is divided into three portions.
The faculty employes are assgned $17,-they are now able to take into their
500, the atinloystarensgn$1,-0,pre-nursing courses, every quarter,
500, the noni-military students $12,500, 100 women where before they could
nd the S. A. T C. nd S. Maccommodate but 25. The course of
pected to raise $20,000. A series of study is the same as the regular
eight-minute talks are being given be-,course which they offer to women who
fore all the organizations there by are to enter their own University
students of the university, in order to
arouse interest and enthusiasm in theI The extra 75 women admitted are
work.a7 wmn dite r
work. supposed to go from there to the reg-
ular nurses training in civilian hos-

AT WAHR'S
"Satus of the War."
by Stoddard and Frank $2.50
Books and Supplies
in General for
Soldiers and Sailors

STU

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Jr........... City
.... Night
n.....' elegraph
in ..........Sport
en........ .AMilitary
.......Women's
......:Associate

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editar

ud A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
L. Abele.......Publication Manager
d M. 'Maor.......Circulation Manager
.ISSUE EDITORS
Landis Paul G. Weber
sH forace X. Porter
REPORTERS
Apel John Kyser
et tChristie HermanLustfield
crier Philip Ringer
Ellis . Bowen Schumacher
Hans Marie Thorpe
BUSINESS STAFF
Wi. A. Leitzinger
YNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1918.
sue Editor-Horace W. Porter
THE KAISER
e kaiser has abdicated and the
ion is !,ludicrous rather than
c. It is'like the lion's head be-
lulled off the donkey. It is 'not
ful of Homer or Marlowe or
espeare describing the downfall
hero, but rather of the vaude-
joke to the effect that Roose-
told the kaiser he had an army
could lick the world and the
r was fool enough to believe it.
ere was nothing great about the
r. He was a titular -head of
Prussian system, acting as the
m directed, not directing the sys-
That is not to say that he was
ulpabe for Prussian. bizarreterie
lndishness; his published and
ed speeches show. that he pos-
y yammered in his eagerness to
s terrible as Nietzchke would
a German But his intellect was
ed. He was an hereditary
e; not a leader through shrewd-
or his might. His own son di-
d him as a popular idol; his
ellors directed his policies and
:eneral staff, his military endeav-
xander was a general, Napol-
a product of the times and the
es; Fochs'the last word in
ee's instinct of self defense.
in their personalities, typified
n surges and urges. The kaiser
an incident of the system.
ien the kaiser sought to impress
people he told them to be like
luns of Attila; he did not orig-
. When Wilson put the spirit
e times into words he voiced a
world philosophy; Lloyd George,
In his influence, attacked vested
ests and old prejudices and made
1eople think anew; Clemenceau
ged the spirit of France by es-
ng the most unpopular cause
known, the cause of Captain
fus. ' And Wilhelm II, king of
sia, emperqr of Germany, inspir-
f God and ruler over the most
ughly schooled people in the
d, not only did not give words to
* thought but harked back to one
.e world's most despised expon-
of brute force for his inspira-
i yet this man was honored, al-
worshipped, by 70,000,000 peo-
He was their ruler, and they
Itted to decrees that bore his
ture. And they say democracies
inefficient. Efficient autocracy
p with this man for a ruler. In-
nt democracies chose Wilson,
enceau, and Lloyd George. In
, -that is the reductio ad absur-
of claims that hereditary auto-
Sis best for a people.
THE GREAT COME-BACK
feating Chicago yesterday, Mich-
made her actual if not formal
try into the Western Conference
.ssumed once more her true pat #
e realm of football. The game

gnificant in that it marks not
the Wolverines' return to the
en but also the avenging of the
ling suffered at the hands of the
ons in 1905. To the 1918 Var-
has fallen the honor of remov-
he blot 'from the escutcheon of

Chicago has always -been a gallant
adversary, and it is a source of no
little pleasure to Michigan men that
athletic relations with her are now
resumed. The revival of the old feud
is a wholesome incentive toward
keeping the Wolverines fighting to' be
"Champions of the West."
'Michigan takes additional pride,
too, in the fact that she was taken
to victory by a war-time eleven-a
team composed of men who are not
shirking their duty to the nation.
That these men, working under dif-
ficulties and having many handicaps
to overcome, should round into a vic-
torious team empowered to make the
great come-back, offers ample proof
that the spirit of Michigan is not
dead.
Varsity, Michigan is proud of you.
Michigan has faith in you, and be-
lieves that you will make this victory
only the opening of a season of glor-
ious gridiron conquests.
The "Paper for Washtenaw County"
heard the echo yesterday that the
kaiser had abdicated. Congratula-
tions!
When the Allies dealt Germany's
hand there was no chance for a royal
fiush.r
Have you paid your "respects" to
the little white booth on the diagonal
walk?

ANNUAL MEETING OF WOMEN'S
LEAGUE TO BE HELD THURSDAY
The annual meeting of the Wom-
en's League will be held lat 4 o'clock
Thursday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium. The meeting will be ad-
dressed by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, who will be introduced by Doris
McDonald, '19, president of the
league. All faculty wives are invit-
ed and every University woman is
urged to be present.
During the 'meeting the war work
program will be discussed by Florence
Field, '20. Cornelia Clark, '20, will
explain the social plans of the league
for the coming year and Elsie Erley,
'20, will give the results of the mem-
bership drive. After the meeting, tea
will be served in the parlors of the
gymnasium.
Tucker-Becker Marriage
Geta Tucker '17, and Harry F.
Becker, '19M, were married yester-
day at one of the Ann Arbor hospi-
tals.
Mrs. Becker is now pursuing a
course in the post graduate school.
She is a member of Pi Beta Phi.
Becker is an intern in the ophthalmic
department of the University hospital,
and is a member of the Phi Rho Sig-
ma fraternity.
Navy hats stitched 50c. Also leg-
gins repaired. Quick Service. Third
floor. 334 South State St.-Adv.

6 I

BUY YOUR.

pitals or cantonment hospitals, where
they receive credit for the 12 weeks'
work done at Minnesota.
The whole course of study as out-
lined by the Dean of the Minnesota
Medical school incdes courses in
anatomy, physiology, pharmocology,
chemistry, bacteriology, physical cul-
ture, dietetics, hospital economy, prin-
ciples of nursing, history of nursing,
ethics of nursing, and personal hy-
giene.
Naval Training Stations to Continue
Armistice or no armistice, peace or
no peace, Great Lakes will not grow
smaller either in area or personnel.
In fact, there will be more than 50,000
men there this winter.
This announcement came tonight.
America's ever growing merchant
marine and the consequent expansion
of the navy will be the chief reasons
for the development of Great Lakes,
and at least two large naval training
stations. These two sister stations
are Newport and Hampton Roads,
which, according to a recent state-
ment of Secretary Daniels, are to be
developed and expanded together with
Great Lakes.
Explosion at Grenade Plant Kills 15
Pokesea, N. Y., Nov. 9.-An explo-
sion in the grenade loading plant at
Port Huron, engaged in war munition
work, occurred last evening. It is re-
ported that 15 persons were killed and
200 injured.

AT

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

FOR LIBERTY

The following casualties are report-
ed today ley the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: Killed in action, 153; died of
wounds, 102; died from accident and
other causes, 3; died from airplane
accident, 1; died of disease, 26;
wounded severely, 35; wounded, de-
gree undetermined, 86; wounded
slightly, 53; missing in' action, 70.
Total, 520.
Dr. Curtis Pillsbury Becomes Major
Another of Michigan's sons to be
promoted to the rank of major is Dr.
Curtis B. Pillsbury, '14M. Major pills-
bury was assistant chief surgeon at
the Homeopathic hospital until he
volunteered his services to the Unit-
ed States during the recent Mexican
trouble. From the border he was
transferred north and soon after, de-
tailed for service overseas. He re-
ceived his commission as major
about eight months ago.

Mrs. T.R1 Stoddard
HAIR SHOP

party

Some Stagg
'yesterday.

Michigan had.

1__

1

i

ee The Army and

Navy forever"

I

l e M,*tr4i#ttri ttY1"

Appeals to Military Men

TEN WEEKS

REMAINDER OF YEAR
$3.00

$1.50

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J

r

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