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November 10, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E WEATHER
MOBABLY RAIN
AND COOLER

S~r Mit ij~twn

4:3attA&V
x

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

1

. No 35.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

ICHIGAN AVENGES1905DEFEAT;WINS
13 TO VICTORYfROM CHICAGOTEAM;
STEKETEE'S KICKING FEATURE OF GAME

CAGO'S TERRITORY SEES MOST
OF YESTERDAY'S
BATTLE
ETZ RUNS 50 YARDS I'm
OR FIRST TOUCHDOWN
ne Is Largely a Punting Contest
Between Steketee and Elton
Stek Wins
:agg field, Chicago, Nov. 9.-Michi-
avenged a defeat of 13 years'
iding,,when the Wolverines took
University of Chicago football
n into camp this afternoon by a
*e of 13 to 0, in a rather loosely
red but hard fought game on this
. In 1905, the Maroons defeated
Maize and Blue warriors in one

MAJOR DURKEE SAYS
"Certainly the work of the
agencies joining in the Unit-
ed War Work campaign cannot
be too highly endorsed. Their
work in the reconstruction aft-
er the war, will be of as great
importance as their work has
been in the past in the stricken
territories and in the home,
camps.
"If human effort can accomp-
lish more in the future than it
has done in the past, it can
only be by the united effort of
agencies.
(Signed)
"RALPH H. DURKEE,
"Major Infantry, U. S. A.,
"Commanding University of
Michigan S. A. T. C."

xah ! JMichigan ! Rah!
We will soon be singing, with truth in every word:
"Hail! to the Victors valiant; Hail! to the conq'ring heroes,
Hail! Hail! to Michigan, the leaders and best!
Hail! to the Victors valiant ; Hail! to the conq'ring heroes,
Hail! Hail! to Michigan, the Champions of the West!"
Michigan's victorious team will arrive at 2:45 today at the
Michigan Central station. Every student must be there to welcome
the men who ground Chicago into the mud.
Michigan,-13 years ago, was trounced by the Maroons, but this
year's squad has more than made up for that old defeat. The old
team of '05 was there to see Chicago go down before the Maize and
Blue, too.
A band should be there to welcome the team, a real Michigan
band with long lines of men behind it. Uniforms should be plenti-
fully mixed with "cits," and frosh pots should mingle with senior
toques.
EVERYONE TURN OUT AT 2:45 TO GIVE A LINE OF "LO-
COMOTIVES."

HEVOLUTION SPRIADING OVIR GERMANl;
ALLIED ARMIES CONTINUE PRESSURE;
BRITISH NEAR MONS AND BELGIUM LIN

UNITDWR WORK TO
START DIVE TONIGHT

MAJOR DURKEE SPEAKS
ON RECONSTRUCTION AIM

e greatest football battles in the I

ory of the game. As a result of
t, today's clash was a thing of 13
rs planning by Coach Yost, the
higan mentor, and the outcome
y repaid the labor and worry of
"Hurry Up" Coach.
he contest, although in part rath-
>oorly played, was one of the most
resting battles seen in the Windy
r this season. The teams fought
d from beginning to end, both of
elevens going into each individ-
play seemingly with the deter-
.ation that now was the time that
game wastto be won. The men
grasped the spirit of former

eld, appearing at 2 o'clock. At' this
me the crowd was gathering slowly.
he Wolverines, led by Acting Captain
ohn, ran onto the gridiron at 2:22
clock, and immediately the Michigan
de of the field broke into a prolong-
I cheer. The yells were led by Brute
amport, the little freshman, who
arned wide praise with his peppy
ay of handling the noise. He start-
I the cheering and finished it. After
e Michigan stand became quiet, the,
elated yells of Chicago's rooters
rowned out all other sounds round
ie Midway. The Maroon backers
ere led by nine cheer leaders.
The game started at 2:30, Cohn
icking off to .Chicago, who lost the
all on a fumble shortly afterward.
'he first few minutes of the contest
ere filled with fumbles by both
des. The dampness of the field was
,rgely the cause for this. This was
e only part of the game that was
cking fight. Immediately after the
rest touchdown, which came in the
rly part of the first quarter, Chica-
> took a new lease on life, and be-
an to fight as they had not fought
afore this fall.
Sensational Score by Goetz
The first counter was the result of
blocked kick by Goetz, who ran 50
irds through a broken field for a
uchdown. The play was fortunate-
combined with a pretty bit of foot-
il. Goetz's going through the Ma-
on line and getting in front of the
all was clever work, and his run aft-
recovering the ball, a piece of beau-
ful open field running. Steketee
cked goal.
(Continued on Page Three)
CARRIERS WANTED
' To carry The Daily. Good
pay. Call at office Monday aft-
ernoon.

Irvin S. Cobb TO
Lecture Nov. 30
Irvin S. Cobb, noted war corre-
spondent and magazine writer, has
been secured by the Congregational
circle of the King's Daughters of
America for a lecture in Hill audi-
torium on Saturday evening, Novem-
ber 30. Although the great majority
of Mr. Cobb's lectures are delivered
before the business men's associa-
tions in the larger cities, he has been
persuaded to come to Ann Arbor be-
cause of-the rare opportunity here
afforded him of speaking directly to
the faculty and the student body.
It is thought probable that condi-
tions and reconstruction work after
the war will be chosen as the subject
of Mr. Cobb's:address, but there will
undoubtedly be present that peculiar
strain of humor which has so endear-
ed him to the hearts of all Ameri-
can readers.
MAXIMILIAN SAYS
WAR SHOULD END
London (by British Wireless serv-
ice), Nov. 9.-Just before Prince Max-
imilian of Baden offered his resigna-
tion as imperial chancellor, he issued
an appeal to Germans abroad in
which he said:
In the fifth year of hostilities, aban-
doned by its allies, the German peo-
ple should no longer wage war against
the increasingly superior forces."
The text of the chancellor's state-
ment reads:
"In these dtfficult days the hearts of
many among you, my fellow country-
men, go outside the frontiers of the
German fatherland and are surround-
ed by manifestations of delicious joy
and hatred which will be punished.
Don't despair of the German people.
Our soldiers have fought to the last
moment as heroically as any army has
ever done, the homeland has shown
unprecedented strength and endur-
ance.
In the fifth year, abandoned by its
allies, the German people could no
longer wage war against the increas-
ingly superior forces. The victory
which many have hoped for has not
been granted us, but the German peo-
ple has won this still greater victory
over itself and its belief in the right
of might."
From this victory we shall draw
huge strength for the hard times
which face us and which you also
can build."

AT 8:46 O'CLOCK THIS
EVENING

HEAR EXCELLENT
SPEECH

"Don't do your bit, do your ut-
most," is the slogan of the Univer-
sity campaign for Unitd War Work
funds which will start off with a
flourish of the Varsity band in Hill
auditorium tonight. No pledges will
be taken at this meeting, 'but Mr.
Hamilton Holt will give a talk that
will make everybody impatient for
Monday to come when they may make
contributions at the Engineering
arch, at the northwest corner of the
diagonal walk, and in the different
buildings of the campus. Special
booths are being made for the two
former places and tables will be
erected in the buildings.
The meeting will start promptly at
6:45 o'clock as members of the S. A.
T. C. have to leave at 8 o'clock for
their study period. This is the finest
opportunity members of the Univer-
sity have had to get real facts and
an American interpretation of the
happenings on all fronts, including
that of Italy. Mr. Holt has just re-
turned recently from Italy, where he
was the American representative at
the Italian demonstration in Rome at
which the Prince of Wales spoke for
England, and Mr. Holt for America.
His speech is in the last number of
"The Independent." This was his sec-
ond trip across and he was commis-
sioned to go this time by Charles E.
Hughes, president of the Italo Amer-
ican allianee, similar to the Franco
American alliance.
The campaign is entirely in the
hands of the students, and it is the
wish of the committees in charge to
keep the campaign within a two days'
limit. Some colleges are limiting it
to two hours. Every department of
the university has been organized to
carry on the publicity work and to see
that every Michigan student is given.
an opportunity to volunteer his pledge.
Forty men from Co. 4, section B, of
the S. A. T. C. had the matter pre-
sented to them Saturday morning and
every man present made a pledge.

"Our newspapers are announcing
that the war is over; for us it has
just begun," declared Major Ralph H.
Durkee yesterday morning in address-
ing section A of the S. A. T. C. in
Hill auditorium.
"The work of reconstruction which
must be carried on and which will
take from five to 10 years is as im-
portant as the war itself. While there
is not so much honor or glory. at-
tached to building a railroad as there
is to winning a battle, it is just as
necessary.
"Do you think it would be fair to
those men who have risked their lives
and have sacrificed everything to
keep them on foreign soil to rebuild
and rehabitate the devastated coun-
tries No, that should be our work.
"We do not know the attitude of
the war department on this matter
and do not wish to make a statement
concerning what will be done. But
we should be physically and mentally
prepared for whatever work is as-
signed."
Major Durkee said that he thought
a great many changes would take
place here in the United States and
that the country would never revert
to pre-war conditions of extravagance.
and carelessness.
In regard to the men detailed to
hospital duty the major said that they
were worthy of high commendation.
"It takes as much 'stuff' in a man to
do that kind of work as it does to
fight and they carried themselves like
veteran soldiers," he remarked.
"Recommendations for officers'
training camps will henceforth be bas-
ed on four things: academic work, 35
points; military ability, 20 points;
physical qualifications, 20 points, and
character, 25 points.
"Military ability includes attitude
toward the work, resourcefulness,
tact, and general usefulness."

MEETING IN HILL AUDITORIUM S. A. T. C. MEN IN AUDITORIUM

"This laudable and generous
enterprise will uidoubtedly be
handled in the best possible
manner by persons of experi-
ence who have proved their ef-
ficiency by their well known
work previous to, and especial-
ly during, the present world
war. Reports have constantly
been received of the good work
done at and behind the lines
of the Allied armies. With the
great amount of devastated
country and the destitute popu-
lation needy of reconstruction
help, whether the war continues,
or not, I join in the hope that all
who can, will join liberally in
contributions to the United War
Work fund."
(Signed) R. M. BERRY,
Rear Admiral,
United States Navy.
Germany 's 7(eply
To Foch Withheld
Washington, Nov. 9.-Germany's de-
cisions on the armistice terms pre-
sented the envoys by Marshal Foch
have not been made known as far as
the American government was ad-
vised late tonight.
Although expecting an announce-
ment at any moment, officials did not
overlook the possibility of delay as
the result of the momentous events
transpiring within the borders of
Germany. The announcement from
Berlin of the decision of William to
abdicate was taken in some quarters
to mean that acceptance of the allies
terms /had been decided upon and
possibly the kaiser had declared his
intention to renounce the throne rath-
er than be a party to accepting such
drastic terms as are known to have
been opposed by the supreme war
council at Versailles. On the other
hand, it was pointed out with the kai-
ser out, those responsible for the con-
duct of the government at Berlin
might possibly ask for a modifica-
tion of the condition now that Pres-
ident Wilson's -demand for the estab-
lishment of a government responsible
solely to the people ostensibly is to
be carried out. There can be no mod-
ification, however, and the armistice
must be accepted or rejected within
the time set by Marshal Foch.
PRINCE MAX TO BE
GERMAN REGENT
Copenhagen, Nov. 9.-R ebellion has
appeared in Hanover, Cologne, Bruns-
wich, and Magdeburg according to the
official announcement at Berlin.
Washington, Nov. 9.-The state de-
partment announced officially tonight
that the U. S. wireless station had
picked up a message from the Maden
towers in Germany announcnig the
abdication of the kaiser. The mes-
sage came direct from Germany to
the American station. The text of the
announcement as it was received here
apparently was the same as that
picked up earlier by the British wire-
less. The department again announced
that no official notice of the German
government had been received witi -re-
gard to the abdication of the kaiser.
Amsterdam (by Reuters), Nov. 9. -
It is semi-officially reported in reich-
stag circles that Prince Max will be
appointed regent of the empire, ac-

FREDERICH EBERT OF SOCIA]
DEMOCRAT PARTY TO BE
NEW CHANCELLOR
REGENCY TO BE SET UP;
KAISER AND SON RESIGN
Son-in-Law of Kaiser Also Abdicate
and Renounces Claims to
Power
William Hohenzollern, German em
peror and king of Prussia, has de
cided to renounce the throne. Thi
separation. was made in a decree is
sued at Berlin by the German imper
iaL chancellor, Prince Maximillian o
Baden. The German crown princ
will also renounce the throne, an
a regency will be set up.
Prince Max will remain in office un
til matters connected with the abdica
tion of the emperor are settled, an
Frederich Ebert, vice-president of th
Social Democrat party, will replac
them as chancellor given the regenc
Thirty years and almost five month
after he ascended the %throne, Em
peror William, his armies defeated I
the field, forced to usue for armistice
and the German people rising In re
volt, gives up his power. They claim
that with his country on the thresh
hold of an era of peace and materia
progress, he leaves by revolution and
retires from the hardships and sacri
fice of more than five years of war-
virtually ruined.
So-in-law Abdicates
Ernest August, Duke of Brunswici
son-in-law of the emperor also ha
abdicated and renounced the rights
of his heir.
With the passing from power o
William Hohenzollern, all the efforti
of the central powers when they en
tered the war have died or lost thei:
thrones. Emperor Francis Josef and
the sultan of Turkey died before thei
countries agreed to the Allied armis
tice terms, and Ferdinand of Bul
garia abdicated to be succeeded b
his friend, who gave up the thron
when his people rose against him
The other European emperor at th
beginning of the war, Nicholas Rom
anoff, was deposed in March, 191
and murdered in July, 1918.
Germany has not yet made a repl
concerning the armistice terms pre
sented by Marshal Foch.
It is reported that the Germa
headquarters had difficulty in eross
ing the battle zone and probably wer
not able to reach Spa until Saturda:
afternoon. The first 24 of the '7
hours given Germany have expired
and the secnd 24 hour period is pass
ing rapidly. The red flag of revolu
tion is waving over a continually in
creasing area of Germany. The re
volt has spread from the northwes
along the North Sea, and Schleswig
Holstein southwestward into Wst
phalia and Cologne on the Rhine, i
reported affected. In Berlin the sit
uation evidently is serious as th
banks have stopped payment.
Field Marshal Haig, General Pe
tain, and General Pershing continu
(Continued on Page Six)
Naval Unit Medical Officer Arrive
Lieutenant Allen L. Porter, assist.,
ant surgeon, U. S. N. R. F., arrive
here from Indianapolis lastFirday t
take charge of all health matters ai
the NavalaUnit. Due to lack oft a
Infirmary and competent assistants, ii
will be a matter of a few weeks be
fore Lieutenant Porter will be abl
to take care of every emergency.
All navy barracks were inspecte
Saturday morning and it is expect
that within 10 days or two weeks th
men will be "shot" with the require
variety of antitoxins.

i

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION-
10:30 A. M. Address by Leonard A. Barrett.
Theme: The Horizon

4:00 P. M.

Young People's Vesper Service

li1 ' [ cording to Berlin advices.
nmmmmusU -

SUNDAY

6:45 P. M.
TONIGHT
Varsity Band

TONIGHT

SUNDAY

S.A.T.C. Muster

University War Meeting
HILL AUDITORIUM

The latest
news from

Hamilton Holt, Editor of "The Independent" Speaker

"Over the

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