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October 27, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

[CIAL NEWSPAPER AT THZ
NIV$RSITY OF MICHIGAN
hed every morning except Monday
he university year by the Board in
of Student Publications.
R OF THE; ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lssociated Press is exclusively entitled
ise for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credited
paper and also the local news pub
rein.
d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
, as second class matter.
iptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
sAnn Arbor Press Building.
s: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
unications not to exceed 300 words,
1, the signature not necessarily to ap-
print, but as an evidence of faith, and
of events will be published in The
t the discretion of the Editor, if left
aied to the office.
ied communications will receive no
ition. No manuscript will be re-
nless the writer incloses postage.
)aily does not necessarily endorse the
ts expressed in the communications.
C. Mighell......Managing Editor
Makinson..... ,. ..Business Manager
R. Osius, Jr............City Editor
ite Clark .............Night Editor
J. Martin........Telegraph Editor
k. Bernstein........Sport Editor
H. Riorden...........Military tditor
Guernsey............Women's Editor
. Ehlbert............Associate Editor
. A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
Abele.......Publication Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
andis P aul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter
REBPOR TERS

pel
t Christie

John Kyser
'Herman Lustfield
Philip Ringer
Bowen Schuniacher
Marie Thorpe

BUSINESS STAFF
onald M. Major Wm. A. Leitzinger
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1918.
Issue Editor-Howard Walser
THE NEW STAFF
This morning the names of the men
id women who have been appointed
the editorial staff of The Daily
apear above this column. A very
w 'of them were there last year, the
ajority are staff members for the
rat time. It has always been the cus-
m to publish at the beginning of
ie year the names of those who were
ppointed to staff positions the pre-
ous spring, leaving the appointment
the new material until Thanksgiv-
g. Like most other customs, this
s gone by the boards in this .year
grace and change. Less than four
eeks ag when The Daily started to
ublih there was in no sense of the
ord an editorial staff.. The upper
aff which entered office last spring
as in service heres or elsewhere to
man, and not one of the od night
litors was available for the night
ork, that most4 crucial point in the
taking of a student morning pper.
All honor to these erstwhile cubs
ho have responded so loyally and
tgorously to the call for tryouts,
ho have taken up responsibilities
reviously considered possible only to
ie experienced upperclassman, and
y their willing, if unskilled, efforts
irnished the basis for the beginning
f an organization; honor to the few
cperienced workers of other years
'ho have been carrying a stagger-
ag weight of work' during this crisis;
onor to the men of the military units,
Ld hands and green beginners, who
ave given up their few minutes of
ecreation that nothing of news value
n the campus might be missed and
at The Daily might be "a good sheet
V the morning."
A spirit has been shown in these
w weeks which warms the heart,
nd shows what the paper has meant
K the lives of the men and women
ho have worked on it. The old boast
hat one could not possibly put more
ito The Daily than one got out of it
as been put to the test and proved
re by this recognition and payment
fa debt of gratitude.
The new staff has eariged whatever
onor it may receive as part of this
reat student activity by these weeks
hard work. Much remains to be
tne and hard work is never over on
newspaper, but there is glory in it,
ot the glory of campus recognition
lone, but the greater glory of be-
ved work well-done.
WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE
In less than two weeks the voters
Michigan will pass upon an amend-
.ent to the state constitution grant-
g suffrage of the ballot to women
1 equal iterms with men: "equal suff-
ge," in other words. To grant wo-
.en the right to vote is but to rec-
gnize that they are human beings;
at they are possessed of reason;
id have and exercise capabilities of
rvice to the state. Men have ad-
itted all those things for years, and
te war has proved them.
Woman suffrage has been defeated
ore than once by the male voters of
ichigan. Extraneous questions of
litical tactics, sex jealousy and a
al feeling that politics and the plac-
of registering political will were
ilgar and degrading played their
art ini this decision, but those rea-

sons would not have been decisive had
the majority of women earnestly
wanted the right to vote.
But since then the women have been
thrown into direct contact with the
world outside the home more than in1
two previous generations, and have
had social derelictions and injustices
brought home to them forcibly. They
have found their requests for improv-
ed conditions treated with more or
less polite sarcasm resulting in no
action, because they do not have the
right to vote. They have seen organ-
ized labor get wage and other con-
cessions because it does have the right7
to vote. The importance of the vote
may have been sufficiently impressed
upon a sufficiently large number of
women to get the vote, even though it
is the men who are voting, for if they
are once convinced that the women
want it, the amendment will be pass-
ed.
And even if it is not certain that
they all do want it, it is certain that
a disenfranchised class never intelli-
gently desires the vote until it has
had it. Citizenship like most things
is learned only through experience
and if the voters of the state wait
until all the women actively demand,
the ballot, they will wait long after
most of them are clamoring against
the injustice of withholding it. More-
over, second thought will show any
man that nearly all classes in the pre-
sent plebiscite are subject to the same
criticismn, that they prize the vote only
when an issue comes along which di-
rectly concerns themselves. The fact
that they have not yet become broad
enough to take an interest in what
concerns the welfare of the classes is .
no reason for withdrawing the suff-
rage. The fact that they possess it
is the guarantee that they will one
day exercise it to the full. So it will1
be with the women of Michigan if the
men of the state will give them the,
chance to prove it.
If Germany does become a republic,
the chances are that the kaiser will
be such a poor citizen that he won't
vote.
Time is money and money will win
the war. Don't waste it; pickle that
hour you lost last night.
What can a fellow do with liberty
when the weather man begins to show
a grouch?
The President is sure that the Dem-
ocractic donkey is the best army
mule.
DRAMATIC CLUB WILL
TRY OUT NEXT WEEK
Tryouts for Masques will be held
in November, and members will be
chosen for the club from those who
show real ability in those tests. The
tryouts are open to all Michigan wom-
en and an announcement of the exact
date will be made later.
Masques is a dramatic club for all
University women and it is also a
large productive organization. Last
year it modified its constitution so as
to become a more democratic society
and aimliated itself with the Women's
league. This year the club purposes
to carry out the same plans. Alec-
ture wil be held once a month on
some phase of amateur play produc-
tion so practical in nature as to be of
real value in teaching amateur plays
in high school. These lectures will
be given by Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson,
director of Masques. Each month
there will also be a play-reading
group who will familiarize themselves
with plays suitable for amateur use.
The 'annual play wil be given as us-

ual, late in the year. As the club
achieved such success in the field of
English comedy last year by the fin-
ished production of the "Amazons,"
they intend to choose something from
that field this year.
Work for the year will center
around this play, the stage-setting and.
costuming will be a part of the plan-
ning of the whofe club so each mem-
ber of the organization will have a
part in the. practical demonstration
of amateur play production.
Forty Vacancies in Naval Unit Filled
Forty vacancies in the Naval Unit
have been filled by men who are Wait-
ing their induction papers. The men
cannot be sworn into the unit until
their papers arrive here and October
3t is the last day allowed the Ann
Arbor recruiting station to swear in
the nisn. Word. has not yet been of-
ficially received as to whether the
time limit will be extended for those
men who hve not yet received their
papers by that date, or whether the
applicants will have to go to'Detroit
to be sworn in.
Preserve your Michigan traditio s.
Subscribe now for The Daily, 3.25.-
Adv.
Always-Daily service-Always.

Wlomen I
The office of the physical director
has been moved from room 46 to 143
in the Natural Science building.-
Extra hockey practice for junior
girls will be held at 3:30 o'clock
Monday .afternoon.
In case of rain, the gymnasium
classes will meet at the entrance of
Natural Science building, North Uni-
versity avenue.
Extra hockey practice for sopho-
mores wil be held at 4:15 o'clock
Monday afternoon. ,
Girls who have made any changess
in their class schedules are requested
to correct them at once at the office
of the physical director as arrange-1
ments are now being made for indoor
work.
The attendance committee for wo-
men will meet from 10:30 to 11:45
o'clock on Monday morning in the
Registrar's office.
Red Cross workers are urged to re-
port daily at Angell house.
NEW SUGAR RULES
HURT CANDY,TRADE
Sweet shops are having great difli-
.ulty in satisfying the ever-present
sweet tooth with their sugar allowanc-
es cut to .one-third the amount they
received before the new rules went
into effect. The Betsy Ross shop and
the Busy Bee are unable to make any
of their own candies as heretofore.
They must depend upon getting them
elsewhere and in this way cannot
nearly obtain the needed supply. For
sweetening their syrups the shops are
using corn and other syrups to a
great extent, thereby conforming to
the regulations as much as possible.
UNIVERSITY WOMEN ASSIST IN
WAR CAMP COMMUNITY SERVICE
University women are asked to co-
operate with the war camp communi-
ty service. Many relatives and friends
have been wasting time trying to find
the barracks of their soldier or sailor
friends. Yesterday all the trains at
the Michigan Central and Ann Arbor
interurban stations were met by Uni-
versity women. The guests were di-
rected to the hostess house, where the
location of each man may be ascer-
tained. Previous to this time many
visitors to Ann Arbor spent much
energy in trying to locate the men,
but this plan does- away with such
unnecessary trouble.
4YEN OF MICHIGAN NAVAL UNIT
TO GET UNIFORMS NEXT WEEK
The uniforms for the men in the
naval unit will be here next week, it
is expected. Final measurements were
completed yesterday. At present the
unit is using bedding furnished by
the army, owing to the shortage in
the navy quartermaster's department.
Sea-bags, blankets, and mattresses for
the men will be ,ordered separately
after the uniforms arrive.
Eight men were sworn into the unit
yesterday, but there are still about
40 vacancies left to complete the quota
allowed Michigan.
HONORARY MEDICAL SOCIETY
SELECT FIVE NEW MEMBERS

At the regular fall meeting of Al-
pha Omega Alpha, international hon-
orary medical society, the following
senior medical students were elected
to membership: L. G. Beinhauer, '19M,
Pittsburgh, Pa.; E. J. Coram, '19M,
Grangeville, Ida.; W. A. Johnston,
'19M, Champaign, Ill.; T. P. Lee, '19M,
Singapore, China, and H. R. O'Brien,
'19M, Lawrence, Kan.
The date of the initiation is as yet
unsettled in view of the prevailing
epidemic.
SOLDIERS 'WILL HAVE PHOTOS
TAKEN FOR MICHIGANENSIAN
It was announced yesterday at the
S. A. T. C. and Naval Unit headquar-
ters that as soon as the editors of the
Michiganensian desire, orders would
be issued instructing the members of
the S. A. T. C. and naval unit to ar-
range for their photographs to be
taken. The photographs of every
man in both units is desired for the
Michigan annual. The photographs
will be individual pictures and no
charge twill be made for the sittings.
Prices Soar Because of Wilson's Note
Copenhagen (via London), Ooct. 26.
-The first Berlin dispatch, regarding
the reception of President Wilson's
note, reports a rise in price on the
Berlin exchange.

Time floved hack
One Hour Tonight
All clocks are one hour slower to-
day than they were yesterday and the
University clocks will follow suit to-
night. It is hoped that these clocks
were not turned back but simply
stopped for an hour. While some
clocks are perfectly willing to be
turned back, others are not, as some-
one -who attempts the process will
readily learn. A large army of clock
doctors will be needed to remedy those
clocks that balked last night when
their owners, in an attempt to comply
with the request of the federal gov-
ernment turned them back.
It is understood that Detroit will
still continue on the same time that
she has had all summer, hence in
traveling from here to Detroit one
hour will be lost.
BelgIan Youths Get M. A. C. Uniforms
Sixty uniforms of cadet grey have
been given to the Belgian relief by
the bandsmen of the Michigan Agri-
cultural college. Alumnae of the col-
lege, -more than a thousand of whom
are now fighting in France, may ac-
cordingly be surprised to encounter
the regalia of their former college
mates adorning some Belgian youth.
E#E -
CATH
W1 SD
1C so ,

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

U

ESTABLISH ED 1887

I

31 Years of Unexcelled Service

Army and Navy Men!
We're at your service with

TEXT BOOKS and

121 E. Washington Street

I

Supplies in General
A warm welcome and best of service always at

Phone 121

Ur

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

,wamwwmna AT"

J

E R Y OaN$N should take
exceptional care of his eye-
sight. At the first indication
that its vigor has been impaired
you, should consult me I will
adivse you conscientiously con-
cerning its condition. If you
don't need glasses I will so
advise you. If you are in need
of them I will give you satis-
factory service.

SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

Help Win The
BY PREPARING FOR CIVIL
OR BUSINESS

AT

...........

Hamilton Business
College
State and.William Ste.

R, C. FULLER

Optometrist - Optician
WITH HALLER & FULLER

STATE-STRgUT

E aI

Exclusive.

Energine

Cleaners

Urn
CORONA
'The light
portable
typewriter.
Weighs 6%A lbs. Over 75,000 in
use. Indorsed by the U. S. Gov-
ernment. Price complete, with
case, $50.00.
0. D. MIORRILL
322 South State Street
(Over Baltimore Lunch)
Typewriters bought and sold
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7 :25
a. m., 8:1o a. in. and hourly to $8:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 :48
a. in. and every hourto 8:48 p. Cm.
Local Cars East Bound- 5:35 a. m., 6:4a
a. in., 7:o5 a. i. and every two hours to
7:05 p.,in., 8:o5 p. in., 9:05 p. in., 10:50 p.
in. To Ypsilanti only: 8:05 p. in,, 9:50 p.
in., 11:4 5 p. in., 1:10oa. in.? 1:20a. im.
To Saline change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:ogta. W., 7:48
a. in., 10:20 p. in., 12:20 idnight.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars
8:48, ro0:48 a. in., 13:48, 2:48, 4:48, 6:49
p. n.
To Jackson and Lansing, Limited car, -8:48
p. in.
Additional Cars to Ypsilanti-9$ .o a. m.,
2:o5, 6:o5, 9:45 p. m., r2:2o midnight.
University Students
The Army and Navy headquarters
for cleaning and altering uniforms is
situated at the corner of N. University
and Ingalls, where your khaki garments
will receive special attention by expert
workmen.
We call for and deliveir with
1 Day Service
W. L. SLEDGE, Prop.
Open from 7:oo a. m. to 9:3o p. mn.
Phone 2734-W; 22644
WE BUY DISCARDED CLOTHES

"M4 Ce JzreOf &iergine"

I

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Clean ing

Pressing

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Courteous and satisfacto
TREATMENT to every custo
er, whether the account be lar
or small.
The Ana Arbor Savings Dai
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000
Resources........$4,000,000
Northwest Cor. Main & Hurl
707 North University Ave.

Repairing

WA KING LC
Open from 11:30 a .m. to 12:00 ,

209 South 4th Ave.

Phone 2508

.:. /

314 S. State

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