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October 27, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

AM) COOLER
TODAY

r S ir i!3an

~Aaitg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

.1

I

No. 23.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1918.

PRICE THREE

HIGAN-A'IGGIE
I I ASSURED
HALTH BOARi
ALS FROM MICHIGAN AND
M. A. C. VISIT STATE
BOARD
PONED CONTEST TOi
LAYED HERE NOV. 231
ity Receives Announcement of
ecess of Athletic Director
With Joy

FRESHIES 1o HOLD
MEETING TUESDAY
Freshmen who are anxious to
learn the traditions of Michigan, will
meet next Tuesday afternoon at 4:30
o'clock in the auditorium of University
hall. This hour is to accommodate
those who are members of the S. A.
T. C.
Because of the military restrictions
which have been placed on hazing
and other means of teaching the year-
lings the traditions of their school,
many of them, without being repri-
manded, have violated some of the
oldest customs of the school. Al-
though the upper classmen would give
vent to their feelings, they are unable
to do so.
Herman August, member of the
Varsity debating team, and Cohn and
Fortune of the football squad, will be
the principal speakers.
CANADIA N VESSEL SINKS
%WITH 343 ON BOARD

FLU CASES LESSEN
IN ARMYANDA CITY

Health Officer Reports Only 22
Cases; Smallest Yet on
Record

New

SECRETARY
PUBLIC

BAKER WARNS'
OF 4GRIPPE CURES"

Five Die from Epidemic Yesterday
Ann Arbor; 18 Naval Unit
Men Sick

in

he Wolverine-Aggie game is
played!

to

ollowing a campaign for permis-
to have the teams meet, despite
fact that the contest has been
Poned once Decause of the epi-
ic now prevailing, Philip G. Bar-
.e, director of athletics at the Uni-
ity, with officials from M. A. C.
ed the state health board at Lan-
"yesterday and were told that the4
e might be played. '
November 23 the Date
has therefore been definitely de-
dl that the Aggies shall invade
igan territory on the 23 day of
amber. The date is considered
1, it being so near Thanksgiving.
h this contest besides the Chicago'
e, for which they have to prepare,
Varsity squad will now have some
i work ahead of them.
iginally scheduled for last Sat-
.y, the order from the state health
,d prohibiting all public gather-
during the epidemic, caused it
a postponed. But officials did not
heart at the thought of the two
e rivals not meeting this year, and
ead, they began to work for the
e at a later date.
he visit to the state health board
led finally, the way the Michigan
dule shall appear for the re-
ider of the season. Chicago will
he first opposition for the Yost-
to meet; the game to be played
tagg field, Nov. 9. Following this
Syracuse university is scheduled
ppear on Ferry field the next Sat-
y, and a week later the Aggies
come to Ann Arbor. .
Le last game of the season is to
layed with O. S. U. at Columbus.
Aggies to Fight
has been two seasons since the
es have been able to take theba-
from the Wolverines, and for this
on they have developed a team
year, with which they promise
ut up a hard fight for the honor.
nce the first contest between the
3 teams in 1898, a keen rivalry
grown up between them with
igan leading in the number of
3 as well as in the number o1
ts scored upon the Aggies. It
be recalled that in 1902 the farm-
suffered the most humiliating de-
in the history of the contests be-
in the two schools, when the
men of that season walked over
Sby a score of 119 to 0.
though it is 16 years since that
est was played, the sting of the
whelming defeat is still felt by
M. A. C. teams, and they are
ting a chance to blot it out. How-
Coach Yost has not as yet give3
kggies a come back, for since that
the Aggies have been able to
but two games from the Maize
Blue.

ALL DROWN;
ASTER

WORST MARINE DIS-
ON PACIFIC
COAST

(By the Associated Press)
Vancouver, B. C., Oct. 26.-The 268
passengers and crew of 75 men were
lost when the Princess Sophia found-
ered last night, the Canadian Pacific
railway announced today. Not a soul,
survived, according to a Juneau wire-
less message, which said that the ship
was picked up by the gale and hurled
across Vanderbilt reef and sent to
the bottom in the waters on the oth-
er side.
(By the Associated Press)
Seattle, Wash., Oct. 26.-Nearly all
those aboard the Princess Sophia, it
is believed here, were Alaskans who
boarded the steamer at Skagway after
coming up the Yukon river from the
interior of the northern territory.
The Sophia struck at 3 o'clock
Thursday morning. It was at first
thought that she would float on the.
high tide Thursday afternoon. Ef-
forts in that direction evidently fail-
ed and the vessel remained fast.
High Wind Stops Rescue
The government lighthouse tenders
and a number of small craft stood by
the Sophia, but a high, wind made it
impossible to transfer any of the pas-
sengers. The vessel was in the path
of the wind, which often sweeps down
the Lynn canal with hurricane force.
Worst Marine Disaster for Years
Shipping men tonight said the loss
of the Princess Sophia, with all
aboard, was the worst marine disaster
in the history of the Pacific coast.
The vessel, 2,320 tons gross, had
been plying in western Canadian and
southeastern Alaskan waters since she
was built in 1912.
The passenger list and details of the
wreck were not available tonight.
WOMEN CAN EASILY BECOME
NURSES BY NEW REGULATIONS
Shortage of nurses for overseas
duties has greatly reduced the re-I
quirements that a woman must ful-
fill should she desire such work. Ac-
cording to word from Washington, the
theoretical nurse will not be given a
chance to go overseas.
Heretofore the requirements for the
honor were very rigid, namely that
the applicant must be a trained nurse
of high standing. This eliminated
those women who had knowledge of
the work, and. who were willing to
take it up but who could not do so be-
cause they lacked the practice period
required. However, under the mod-
ifications of the requirements, it is
now only necessary for the applicant
to have had a month or two of the
practical work, providing she has the
theoretical end of it.
Application for the work may be
maie at the satisfactory completion
of a course in the care of sick in the
home. Necessary forms are in the
hands of Ied Cross officials.*

(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 26.-Use of vac-
cines in stopping or treating Span-
ish influenza has not gone beyond the
experimental stage so far as the pub-
lic health service can learn. In a
statement tonight the public health
service warned the public against any
"sure cures" for the disease, which,
according to reports today, is rapidly
subsiding among the civilian popula-
tion and in army camps.
The reports received from army
camps continued favorable today and
Secretary Baker indicated that the
army medical authorities have the
situation in hand. It was intimated
by the secretary that the epidemic will
not further delay military plans to
any extent.
Figures issued yesterday show that
the influenza epidemic is onthe de-
cline in this city. Five deaths re-
sulted from it but only six new cases
of influenza were reported among ci-
vilians and only seven men of the
military units were sent to the hos-
pitals with the disease. Yesterday
the number of deaths was one less
but the new cases numbered 22, which
was the smallest number since the
epidemic began to spread.
Thirty-nine men were discharged
from the Barbour gymnasium infirm-
ary yesterday and 10 were sent from
the hospitals to the convalescent in-
firmaries. After their discharge from
the hospitals, the men are sent to the
convalescent infirmaries that ~~ they
may be kept under close supervision
and may be given special care. As
announced previously there are four
orderlies at each infirmary and a se-
nior medic is on duty at each of them
at all times. Everything is arranged
and carried out for restoring the con-
valescents to health in the quickest
possible time.
The number of cases of influenza
is rapidly decreasing among the mem-
bers of the S. N. T. C., and only 18
men of the unit now have the dis-
ease, according to announcement from
the commandant's office yesterday. Of
the 561 members of the unit only one
.man has died.
Those who died in the city yester-
day were: Bryant Gump, and Carl
Dyer, both of third company section
B of the S. A. T. C., and Mrs. M. De-
Ette Barrows, Troexell Horney, and
Philip, the baby son of Mr. and Mrs.
Herman Werner.
LIEUT. W. E. SQUIER REPORTS
FOR DUTY AS PERSONNEL AIDE
Second Lieut. Walter E. Squier has
reported for duty at Regimental head-
quarters here. Lieutenant Squier
comes from the Yale Training Unit,
and has been assigned to Captain
Durkee's staff to do personnel work.
He is acting as assistant to Lieutenant
'Crawford, personnel adjutant.
Big Campaign for Phonograph Records
New York, Oct. 26.-Five hundred
cities and towns throughout the Unit-
ed States started an intensive drive
today, under the auspices of the Pho-
nograph-Records Recruiting Corps,
this city, to round up a million or
more phonograph records to be sent
to American soldiers and sailors in
cantonments here and in service over-
seas.
In New York hundreds of men and
women prominent in musical and pa-
triotic work are devoting their time to
make "canned music week" a certain
success. The 15,000 music dealers in
the United States are co-operating to
get the idle or "slacker records" out
of their dusty cabinets and into the
service of the soldiers. Every music
store is a voluntary receiving station

for idle records and those sent to the
dealers will be promptly put into ac-
tive service in some camp, on a de-
stroyer or transport, or at the front
in France.

ONE XMAS PARCEL
TO EACH SOLDIER
Christmas gifts to the men in Eng-
land or France must go through the
Red -Cross. Each soldier receives a
label which he sends to some relative
at home. When presented at the post-
office this label entitles the holder to
a carton. Each carton is approved
by the Red Cross if it does not weigh
over three pounds and contains the
proper label.
No other boxes will be accepted and
people are requested to make no ap-
plications at department stores for
cartons as they are only on sale at
the postoffice. Time for sending par-
cels has been extended from Nov. 15 to
Nov. 20.
BERMAN UPPER HOUSE
PASS SUFFRAGE BILL'S
REACTIONARIES REFUSE TO VOTE
ON BILL AS AMENDED BY
COMMITTEE
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Oct. 26.-The Prussian
upper house has passed en bloc the
three electoral bills as amended by
a special committee, according to a
Berlin dispatch. The reactionaries
did not vote. Berlin advices early in
October said that the Prussian up-
per house had rejected the motion to
introduce suffrage based on vocations
and had passed an equal direct suf-
frage measure, in accordance with the
government bill, with an addition of
an extra vote for persons over 50
years of age.
The house just modified article

three of the electoral reform
which caused the rejection of
measure by the lower house.
article provided for one vote for
man in Prussia and did away
plural voting.

BRITISH STRIKE AT LE QUESNOY, VITAL
TO DEFENSE OF MON'S AND MAUBEUGE;
ENTENTE ADVANCE MENACES RETHE

bill,
the
This
each
with

U. S. SOLDIERS HAVE SINGS
UNDER EFFICIENT LEADERSHIP
Washington, Oct. 26. - The "yell
leader" has given way to the gov-
ernment's song leader in 564 colleges,
and 250,000 student members of the
S. A. T. C. are to become.singing sold-
iers.
Singing is not considered as a rec-
reation but as an essential feature of
the soldier's life. It has been said
that group singing is the best weapon
against fatigue. So eager to sing were
the men stationed at an eastern col-
lege that they taught themselves "The
Marsellaise" in French from a pho-
nograph record in anticipation of
their arrival overseas. Today every
student-soldier automatically becomes
a member of the "Glee club" of the
United States Army. It is anticipat-
ed that within six months a half mil-
lion voices will have been added to
the choruses of the marching medleys.
The work will be conducted under
the personal supervision of Prof.
Peter W. Dykema of the University of
Wisconsin for the war department
commission on training camp activi-
ties.
GERMANY WILL SEND REPLY TO
WILSON'S NOTE VERY SOON
(By the Associated Press)
Copenhagen, Oct. 26.-The Berlin
Lokal Anzieger says that a new note
will be sent by Germany to President
Wilson as soon as possible. A crown
council, under the presidency of the
emperor, lasting several hours reach-
ed this decision Friday. The note, it
is asserted, will point out the ihanges
which have taken place in the Ger-
man constitution.
Technic Will Be Published as Usual
The Technic, the engineering mag-
azine, will be -issued for October if
present plans mature. Depending on
the success of this number as to the
availability of material for" the edi-
torial and business staff, it will be
decided if the Technic shall be pub-
lished for the remainder of the year,
which is probable unless the Engi-
neers' Reserve is inductedinto the S.
A. T. C.

Clown Quince Has
Incurable fra lady
A terrible disease gnaws away at
the face and neck of the crown prince
and has become so virulent that it has
even eaten away part of the simple
one's crown. The clown quince about
four years ago began to lean his phs-
yog over the countries known as Bel-
gium and France. With his face and
prominent landmark of a proboscis
stuck greedily into foreign territory,
he was exposed daily to the effects of
a disease which is known to the med-
ical profession as rodent ulcer of the
Allied type. This disease has lately
been advancing with great rapidity,
especially along the forehead and
nose of the disrespected Hun and he
complains now of a pain along his
scrawny neck.
This fact was observed last even-
ing by the officers at S. A. T. C. head-
quarters when they happened to get
the right profile of the enormous war
map as it hangs on the wall in their
front office. The map, which was pub-
lished by the Literary Digest for May
1, 1918, gives a remarkable profile of
the quince, his crown being the upper
ragged border of Belgium, the face
and neck being formed by the western
borders of Belgium and Germany.
The lower neck is the part of Ger-
many which is just about to be enter-
ed by the Allied troops. The figure
is leaning to the west but the line of
the Allied advance, as it is now, shows
that his head is losing a lot of. its
front lawn.
Needless to say, no medical men
here are working on an antitoxin. As
with the old treatment of packing a
cancerous growth with meat to sup-
ply the growth with food, the kaiser
has been backing the affected area
with German flesh, the result being
the same as it was in the olden days.
On with the disease, let its ravages
be unconfined.
FRENCH TO STUDY AMERICAN
LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION
Paris, Oct. 26.-Prof. Charles Ces-
tre, head of the English department
at Bordeaux, has been appointed di-
rector of a course in American liter-
ature and civilization in French uni-
versities. This course has Just been
inaugurated with the view of promote.
ing intellectual interests between
France and America in the same way
that other relations between the two
countries are held. This will serve to
make the already firm bond of in-
ternational friendship much more
'firm.
M. Cestre is a graduate of Harvard
and after his graduation was an in-
structor there. His plan is to trans-
form the course eventually into a
regular professorship with a complete
library and facilities for research
study in the United States.
Food Conditions Critical in Russia
London, Oct. 26.-A winter of star-
vation is a safe prediction for Rus-
sia. Indications are that it will be
one of the worst winters the Russian
people have experienced in all their
history.
All summer the food situation in
Russia, particularly in Moscow, Pe-
trograd and other large cities has been
steadily growing more and more
acute. In the latter part of August
bread had almost entirely disappear-
ed, and certain city districts had not
received the usual allowance for near-
ly a week.

The shortage of bread is largely due
to the government's short-sighted
policy in fixing a low price for grain
which did not even cover the farm-
er's expenditure, let alone profit. The
peasants refused to comply with the
-decree to turn over all grain in ex-'
cess of a certain arbitrarily fixed
amount to the food committee, and
when the latter were re-enforced by
a detachment of armed "bread cru-
saders," the peasants gathered from
several villages and offered resistance,
frequently putting the crusaders to
flight.

ENEMY LOSES 1917 DEFENSES;
GERMANY SUFFERS 50,000
CASUALTIES
ALLIES TAKE BACK
400 SQUARE MILE S
Italians Make Big Gains in Spite of
Resistance in Piave Region;
Capture 2,000 Men
(By the Associated Press)
London, Oct. 26. - British troops
have occupied the villages of Artres
and Famars, south of Valenciennes
and have made progress along the
Scheldt toward the outskirts of that
town, Field Marshal Haig reports to-
night. The British have made further
progress toward the Scheldt and have
captured the village of Azelghem,
southeast of Courtrai.
(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Oct. 26.-The French troops
fighting between the Oise and the
Serre rivers have made an extended
advance eastward, occupying numer-
ous villages, according to the war of-
fice tonight. Twenty-three hundred
prisoners have been captured in the
operations between Soissonne and
Chateau Porcien.
(By Reuter's)
British Headquarters in France, Oct.
26.-British infantry, moving along the
railway of Le Quesnoy, have failed to
detect any evidence of Germans in the
town of Valenciennes. Cavalry pat-
rols are moving forward, reconnoiter-
ing the country.
(By the Associated Press)
Germany's hard pressed soldiers
are being given no rest as the Brit-
ish, French, and American forces con-
tinue with success their drives on im-
portant sectors from north of Valen-
ciennes to east on the Meuse. Mean-
while the Italians are pushing ahead
in the region of Monte Grappe.
British Near Le Quesnoy
South of Valenciennes Field Marsh-
al Haig is across the Valenciennes-
Le Quesnoy railroad, and the fall of
Le Quesnoy, which is vital to the de-
fense of Mons and Maubeuge, would
appear to be near at hand. The fight-
ing on this sector continues bitter
with the British striving to outflank
the Mormal forest. On the northwest
of the forest the British have advanc-
ed somewhat, and have captured Eng-
lefontaine and a nearby hill.
Along the northern edge of the
Raismes forest, north of Valencien-
nes, the British have approached near-
er the canalized portion of the
Scheldt river. In this region they
have captured the villages of Odonez
and Maulde.
French Make Progress
Between the Oise and the Aisne riv-
ers the French are making rapid
strides toward the cities of Marle and
Montcornet. Further east a big hole.
has been torn in the German defenses
begun in 1917. Between Banogne and.
Herpy the French have driven for-
ward toward Montcornet, a distance
of about two miles on a front of be-
tween four and five miles. A contin-
ued advance here menaces the Ger-
man hold on Rethel.
Allies Take 400 Square Miles
In the last week the Allied troops
in France and Belgium have freed
400 square miles of territory from the
grasp of the enemy. Paris estimates
(Continued on Page Six)

is year, however, they have built
i machine which is recognized the
itry over, as one of the best
ucts of the farmer school.
Weight and Brains
Ith weight and brains are combio-j
in the exceptional farmer ma-
e. Their team is built around
tically one man, yet every other
the team is considered a star.!
is, the fast and brainy quarter-
:, is the mainstay of the M. A. C.
, and is considered one of the
products the school has ever
ed out.

ued on page three)

I

. C. to Be Completely Clothed
measurements for uniforms
nen in the Naval Unit have
n completed. I$ the S. A. T.
urements were finished yes-
f all ununiformed men in both
A and B. - '-'"

More Orders Waiting at Draft Board
Orders were received from Wash-
ington for the following:
Ralph Moore Carson, Langan Joseph
Noard, Reginald Marnn Goodenon,
Norman Reeder Gibson.
These orders are in the draft
board's office at the court house and
should be called for as soon as possi-
ble.

ORGANIZATIONS, NOTICE!
Organizations and boards of
officers of societies which wish
their pictures to appear in the
IMichiganensian war annual must
E have their prints at the Michi-
j ganensian offices before Nov. 10.
All copy must be in before Nov.
15. Nothing will be accepted for
the book after these dates unless
special arrangements are made
immediately with the editor, who
will be in the offices daily from
2:30 to 4:30 o'clock, phone 16-J.

'

40

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