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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 21, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Here's the Place and Now's the Time to Order it
. -YOUR DRESS SUIT JTl
FOR THEL
G. H. WILD COMPANY
"CLOTHES OF THE BETTER GRADE"
STATE STREET TAILORS

AL SESKS

FOUNTAIN PENS
Be prepared and write a good
Exam. with a
We carry all makes of Pens
STUDENTS' BOOKSTORE

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
Cars run o n Eastern time, one hour faster
tan local timue,t
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--8:10 a.
n. anti hourly to 7:o p. 1., 9:10 p. in.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 6:48 p. In.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. in.
Local Cars, Eastbound-s:35 a. in., 6:40 a. m.,
7:03 a. in., and every two hours to 7:05 p. m.,
8:05 P. n.,,9:05 p.n "., 10:45 p. in. 'o Ypsi-
anti only, 8:48 'a. n. (daily except Sunday),
y:zo a. M., 12:05 p. m, 6:05 p. m., 11 :15 p.
m., 1:15 a. m"., ;1:30 a. m.
Local Cars, Westbound-6:12 a. n., 7:50 a.
m., and every two hours to 7:50 p. n1., 10:20
p. mn., 12:20 a. mt.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Organized 1869
Caphal.. ........$ 300,000.00
Surplus..........$ 150,000.00
Resources over .... $3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
Main Office, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
Branch Office, 707 North Univ"
eriyAvenue.
COME IN AND TRY OUR
Chinese Combination Lunch

TRY
AP MA'S JEWELRY STORE
For Akirm Clocks and Michigan Pins
113 SO. MAIN STREET
Our "Tailor-Made' Clothes Cost No More
Than the Average "Ready-Made~
CAN SLE, The Tailor
108 E. Washington St Second Floor
CHOp off a few
minutes and eat some of
'W-411KING LY10
314 S. State St. Phone 124-M
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $too,ooo Surplus and Profit $$65,ooo
DIRECTORS:
WIRT CORNWELL WALDO M. ABI3OTT
GEO. W. PATTERSON HARRY M. HAWLEY
S. W. CLARKSON HARRISON SOULE
FRED SCHD .D . I. B.SUTTON
F~. ID KNN1}.
FOR
CHOICED CUT FLOWERS I
GO BISCHOFF'S GRE I
TGO C O FI HOCUSE
220 Chapin St. Phone 809-M
The Farmers & Mechanics Bank
South Main Street State Street Office
Corner Huron 330 S. State St.

m- i-- i
NICHIANDAI L
O ficial newspaper at the Universty o 1
Michigan. Published eeiy morning except
Monday during T-he university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class 'fatter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $.5. \vant
ad, stations: Quarry's, Students' Suppi>
Store, The Delta, cor. Packard and State
Phones 1usiness, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Francis F. MKinney...Managing Editor
John S. Leonard....... .Business Manager
;. Rodgers Sylvester News Editor
Tonm C. Reid...............Telegraph Editor
Verne Burnett.............Telegraph Editor
r. I. Wright..................Sports Editor
J. C. B. Parker..........Assignment Editor!
Conrad N. Church...............City ditor
Edwin A. Hyman ...............Cityditor
Lee Joslyn...................ity ditor
Irwin Johnson.........hr. Eficiency-Board
G;ordon). Cooke........Statistical Editor
Edward E. Mack........Advertising Manager
II. Kirk White.........Publication Manager
Y R. Althseler........Circulation Manage
C. V. Sellers ....... ......... ...Accountan
C. T. Fishleigh ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
Leonard W. Nieter William F. Newton
Earl Pardee Wilam 11. ort
Reporters
II. A. :tgerald I. T,. Stadckcr
Waldo IR. hunt Golda Ginsberg
Martha Gray Nat Thompson
W. R. Atlas R. T. McDonald
E, A. Bauingarth L. S. Thompson
Bruce Swancy F. I,. Ziegler
R. . Blum C S. Huntley
Business Staff
Albert L;. home Rosco Rau
E. C. Musgrave F. M. Sutter
If. S. M\cColl Maxwell Cutting
C. E. Campbell 1) W. Said
George Nobil
FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 1916.
Night Editor. . ....Walter R. Atlas
CONGRATULATION
Too frequently the Council has
been accused of attracting men of
small calibre and giving them a
chance to put something after their
names in the Michiganensian. This
might have been true at one time,
though we are inclined to doubt it
now. Last year it managed to ac-
complish some things in spite of an
overwhelming disbelief in its capa-
bilities. This year, with much of
the adverse pressure removed, it has
handled itself very creditably. The
coming semester holds still more
promise.
Henry C. Rummel has been selected
to guide the organization for the en-
suing term. To our way of thinking
no better man could have beenm
found. We donot say this because
he has been a prominent man on the
campus; not because he has a pleas-
ing personality; not because he can
keep a premise, but because he has
learned to think in terms of the Uni-
versity and subordinate himself to
her welfare.
A FREE DEBATE
Tonight in Hill Auditorium Michi-
gan meets Northwestern in the first
intercollegiate debate of the year.
Our traditions in this line of endeav-
or are as highly valued as in any
other line. The men who shoulder the
responsibility of keeping the record
bright have spent long, grinding
hours in preparation for the struggle.
They deserve the best of support.
At the beginning of the collegiate
year little cards were given out with

Selected Editoral

r 1
By William I. Faunce
(Detroit News-Tribune)
Thousands of young people are ask-
ing: "Can I get into college?" It
would be well for them to ask: "Wil
I be able to stay in college after I
get there?"
About 25 per cent of those ,who
enter each year drop out before they
are graduated. In some small, com-
pact colleges only 10 per cent drop
out.
In large, loosely knit institutions
sometimes 50 perycent disappear be-
fore the coveted diploma is reached.
They enter college full of life and
hope, and theyfall out baffled and
dejected. Why is this?
It may be for excellent or unavoid-
able causes. It may be because of
ili-health or financial disaster or the
pressure of home obligations. It may
also be because of pernicious friend-
ships or false ideals formed in the
freshman year. It may be because
the college itself neglects the in-
dividual student and leaves him to
sink or swim alone.
But the chief trouble is that the
average boy is not "prepared" for
college. He does not stay in college
because he has no staying power, no
capacity for attention, no ability to
concentrate.
I met in the college library a
student from one of our best New
England families, bending over a
book, weary and bored.
"How are you getting on?" I asked.
He answered: "How in the world does
a man spend a whole hour looking
at one book? After ten minutes I find
myself looking out of the window?"
"How old are you?"
"Nineteen."
"Nineteen, and cannot concentrate
for one hour? You ought to have
learned that," I said, "when you were
twelve years of age."
Soon after he "dropped out" and is
now wandering over New England
looking for a job where success can
be won without attention-and there
is no such job.
The trouble with many boys when
they enter college is not that they
have bad habits, but that they have
no habits at all. Not that they are
going wrong, but that they are, not
going anywhere.
They are versatile, attractive and
aimless.
They cannot focus their minds for
an hour on any object or subject.
They are distracted minds, bundles
o scattered energies.
They know a hundred things on the
surface, nothing down to the roots.
They have ten times as much in-
formation as their father had at the
same age, and yet do not know the
meaning of work.
They are dazzled by a constantly
changing world.
They can tell the name of every au-
tomobile that whizzes by the front
door, but can not solve any problem
that demands 20 minutes of honest
thinking.
They are charming young fellows to

Office Supplies in general.

The greatest stock in ihe County

Main
St.

each book of athletic coupons. These
cards are good for admittance at the
auditorium tonight. Some foresighted
person was preparing for the oppor-
tunity which offers itself now. Are
we going to do our part?

UNIVERSITY flOOKSJTORES

State
St.

WOULD YOU BE HAPPY?
Then uv a
HANDY DESK CALENDAR

Hear the Hits From

NewYork's LatestOperas
"Sybil " "World of Pleasure" "Katinka"
"Stop, Lek Listen"

and other-s at the

*

C. yvenrsd uWi1 t ee
Cor. Maynard and Willi"am Stre e s,

You may also need a
""National" or Excelsior Dary

um

Go TO
For the BEST in
SODAS
CANDIES
I INCH ES

Quarry's
Prescription
Store

OII State

For

CITY LAUNDRY
THOS. ROWE, Prop.
Detroit Street Phone 457-M

P.M. 2

5:30 P. M.
to 7 P. M:

.

Zichigan Inn
Chop Suey

JANUARY

S A L E

iberty St.

Opp. the Arcadia 1,A GOOD STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED

Id

Dncig pS

DISCOUNT ON ALL WOOL NS
FOR THE NEXT THIRTY DAYS
hENeY A& OMPA Y, TAoIL S
North Univer-sity Ave. Dlrectly North of Law Btildgzg

Patent and Dull Dancing
Pumps and Oxfords
for Men

know, but nearly useless in any .col-
lege or in any business office.
They are not "self-starters;" they
must be cranked constantly by some
employer or teacher,*or they can not
move.
It would be an immense gain to
American colleges if about one-quar-
ter of the students now in them could

Patent, Dull, Bronze Kid,
and Colored Satins for Ladies.
A H R'S SH O TORES

"""""

MAIN STREET

STATE STREET

be immediately excluded, and their
places filled with the eager outsiders
who are longing for a chance to study
-but who is wise enough to select the
men that are not worth while? We
shall have to depend on the clumsy
examination systeni for a long time
to come.
But two things we can do. We can
every one who wants to enter
college that "preparedness" is vastly
ire than cramming down the lan-
gt ages and mathematics.
To be prepared means to have ac-
quired a real ambition. It means the
power to say "no" to foolish things
and "yes" to the big things of life.
It means to possess a backbone that
is more than a "chocolate eclair." It
means getting done with "kiddish-
ness' and resolving. to play the man.
le who is still a child--in fickle pur-
pose and flabby will-should stay out
out of college again in January. "Can

eaehers of Commercial
Subjects preparted at
imilton Business College
State andWilaiams Ste.

IIll

RADUATES VISIT FORESTRY DE-
PARTMENT EARLY IN WEEK
Old acquaintances gladdened the
earts of the members of the forest
aculty the fore part of the week. E.
. Jotter, '09, and 0. F. Shaefer, '14,
ere the visitors to the department.
otter is forest examiner on the Trin-
,y National Forest in California, and
haefer is forest assistant on the Coco-
ino Naional Forest in Arizona.
ROFESSORS CHOSEN TO GO TO
GRAND RAPIDS FOR CONFERENCE
President Harry B. Hutchins yester-
ay announced the appointme'nt of

Women's Organizations
The members of the Athletic Com-
mittee will meet at Barbour gymna-
at 4:30 o'clock.
There will be a meeting, of all
women interested in writing music and
lyrics for the Junior Girls' play at
Barbour gymnasium at 5:00 o'clock
today.
There will be a special party given
by the Women's League this afternoon
at 4:32 o'clock.%
Dr. Rachel Yarrow, of Hull House of
Chicago, the settlement house of which
Miss Jane Addams is the head, was a
dinner guest at Martha Cook building
last Wednesday, and gave the girls a
talk on the work now being conducted
at Hull House.

For Young Men

Correct Evening Dress

H AT-high silk with broad felt band.
COAT-swallowtail with trousers to match.
WAISTCOAT-single breasted of white pique or lined.
COLLAR-poke or wing.
CRAVAT-white pique or linen, figured or plain.
SHIRT-white stiff linen or pique.
JEWELRY-pearl links and studs.
GLOVES-white glace, cape or silk.
REEFER-grey, black or white silk.
SHOES-patent cloth top button, patent oxfords or pumps.

Complete new lines of the above articles
up-to-date in style, moderate in price

a.. a man.
The other thing we can do is to in-
sist that the college itself shall take
better care of the freshmen. All the
colleges are now waking up to the
wate and wreckage of the freshman
y ar. In different ways we are all
attacking the same problem.
At Harvard the remedy is offered
through freshman dormitories, practi-
cally scgregating the freshman class.
At Princeton the remedy is found in
a system of preceptors, each one hav-
ing a squad of five or six students
under his personal guidance.
At Amherst it is proposed to open
to the freshmat'n courses in economics,
which will lead them out of "prep.
school studies" into the discussion of
the fundamental problems of modern
At Brown we shall require all new
students this year to take a course of
one hour a week in what we call the
"Orientation of Freshmen"-instruc-
(Cointiliuc on Page Five)

rofessors H. C. Adams, J. S.
. R. Friday and Dr. Rufus

Reeves,

Our Service
is always Gentlemanly, Courteous

Tucker [ and Prompt. Stark 2255.'

tf

represent the university at the fifth
.nual state conference on taxation
mIch meets in Grand Rapids on
arch 1 and 2.
- EXCLUSIVE
ung me's haberdashery on sale by
F. Allen & Co., Main street.

Now
is none too soon to make arrange-
ments for our Taxi service for the J-
Hop. Stark 2255. tf
Shirts made to order.-G. H. Wif
Company. State St. Tailors.

WAGNER & COMPANY
State Street
Estab!isbed 1848

- U q_

pq

IN

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