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January 21, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-01-21

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.

THE DAILY
$1.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

IL .
op.

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERTICE BYTH
NEW YqRB SUN

-1

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x

VOL. XXVI. No. 81.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 1I IlAY, JANUARY 21, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

- ----.---- ------ .-.--------- -- - -.--~-=_______________ --------- I

. _ .

DEBATERS TO ARGUE
ON ITERACY TEST
FOR IMMIGRANTS
MWIC(IGAN MEETS NORTHWESTERN!
CONTENDERS IN HIL
AUDITORIU
DEBATERS HAVE GOOD RECORDS
Delta Sigma Rho Banquets Contes-
tants, Coaches and Judges
at Union
"A literacy test for immigrants"
will be the subject under discussion
when Michigan's debating team meets
* F H * * * * * * * *
* *
*~ FACTS ABOUT TilE J)EBATE *
* _ _*
Dean Mortiner E. Cooley pre- *
sides. *
* Delta Sigia lRho entertains *
* visiting team, judges, and pre-
* siding officer, at dinner after *
* debate.
Band begins playing at 7:45 *
* o'clock.
Teams come upon platform at
8:00 o'clock. *
* Audience is requested to be *
seted by 8 o'clock.
* Student must present orator-
* ical association tickets prop- *
* erly signed.
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
Northwestern in Hill auditorium to-
night in'the first contest of the year.
Michigan will uphold the affirmative
and Northwestern will defend the neg-
ative side of the question.
The Michigan team is as follows:
Wilbur M. Brucker, '16L, graduate
of the Eastern High School, Saginaw,
(Continued on Page Six)
COMMITTEE PLNS
BUSRHCAMPIGN-
Budget of $3700 for Arabian Medical
Mlssioi to Be Considered
at Meeting
INEEBONE TO MANAGE CANVASS
The problem of planning and putting
into execution plans for the raising
of the necessary $3700 to cover the
budget of "Michigan in Arabia," the
medical mission at Busrah, Arabia,
supported by the students of Michigan
through the Students' Christian asso-
ciation, will be considered by the Bus-
rah committee at its first complete
meeting tonight at 6:45 at Newberry
ball.
The Busrah committee, which is
under the general charge of John R.
Kneebone, grad., will be organized
in two units this year. The executive
committee, composed of John R. Knee-
bone, general chairman, Philip Love-
joy, executive secretary, Miss Freda
Seigworth, '16, Y. W. C. A. represen-
tative, and publicity men Verne Bur-
nett, '17 (chairman), Carl W. Neu-
man, '18, Rudolph F. Wuensch, '17, and
Waldo R Hunt, '16, will have general
charge of the work. This committee
will be assisted in carrying on the
work in the various schools and cob
leges by an Intercollege committee
consisting of men who will head up the

work each in his own department.
Albert Lehman, '17, Donald W. Ogil-
bee, '16L, George Johnson, '19M, Alt-
more Beach, '18E, and Clifton Marree,
'17D, will be the men who make up
this later committee.
Among the innovations in the plans
of campaign that are already under
consideration for use this year argj
contributions. A faculty advisory com-
(Continued on Page Six)

Latest Gargoyle
On Sale Today
Campusl lurnor Publication to Feature
Trainin ig Question
Tfhe Military Training issue of the
Gargoyle will appear at noon today
according to schedule. A striking
cover design in red and black by D.
T. Hoffman, '19M, a running fire of
telling sarcasm and irony on militar-
isma in general, a profusion of illus-
trations, and a double-page drawing
1y Harry Leach, '16E, furnish the most
striking features of this issue.
Without doubt the feature of the
issue is the double page drawing of
the campus under military training.
Besides exhibiting excellent technic,
the picture embodies over sixty sep-
arate ideas, and unquestionably is the
best thing the Gargoyle has ever put
out.
Two new men have been added to
the staff: R. J. Wheeler, '17L, liter-
ary staff, and E. S. Horkheimer, '18
busines staff. The business manager,
regarding whom some anxiety is felt,
when last seen was making his way
toward the east, presumably in the
direction of Canada.
BUNKER ADDRESSES ENGINEERS
"Always0 Do the Best You Know How"
Says Law Professor
"The debt you pay back to Michi-
gan makes you richer as you pay it,"
said Prof. Robert E. Bunker, of the
school of law, yesterday, at the soph
engineer assembly, in speaking of
what they owe to the university for
the many opportunities it has given
them. "Never allow yourself to in-
vade property or private right," and
"Always do the best you know how,"
was some more advice that Prof.
Bunker gave in his address.
At the business meeting following,
A. B. Weston was elected hockey man-
ager.
UNION MAILS APPEAL TODAY
Students Asked to Assist in Sending
Out Letters to Alumni
The Michigan Union needs the serv-
ices of one hundred men at 10 o'clock
to aid in sending out bulletins, Cam-
pus News Notes, to raise the rest of
the money for the million dollar build-
ing which is being planned. There are
two of these bulletins, and they are to
be enclosed in an envelope with a
,etter written by President Hutchins.
The combination of the three can not
held but hit home to the thirty thou-
sand Michigan alumni to whom they
are to be sent.
There is a great deal of work to be
done and 100 men are needed to
do it.
MIMES EMPLOY NEW SYSTEM
Will1Honor Orchestra Members as
Well as Cast in Future
At a meeting held last Wednesday
the Mimes of the University of Michi-
gan Union elected the following new
members: Frank C. Wheeler, '16E,
Harold B. Forsythe, '17 , Lee M.
Parker F'17. and Damon C. Walthall,
'16M These men are all members
of the orchestra of last year's opera
and were elected on account of a new
change of policy on the part of Mimes
which is to put the members of this

body ons a par with the players that
take part in the opera itself.

AMllRICAN LEBIDN
TO FOUND BRANCH.
-AT UNIVERSITY
iMlIL TARIY (OR(AN IZATION A W3WI'?
MEN FITTED FOR
SERiVICE
MEMBERS IN TWO CLASSES
Dischaiged Soldiers and Sailors ir
First Division;.Second In-
cludes Civilians
Plans are being formulated to es
tablish a university branch of the
American legion a military organiza-
tion. The legion embraces thousands
of men at present who are engaged in
various trades. In a recent campaign
in New York 10,000 men enrolled in a
week, and 5,000 in a similar campaign
which was held in Detroit.
The United States at present has
no record of the addresses and quali-
fications of its honorably discharged
soldiers, sailors and marines, nor has
it information of available men trained
in the various occupations essential to
the conduct of modern war. The
American legion was formed to enroll
the names of all such men qualified
either by previous military training or
technical experience, and who will ex-
press their willingness to respond in
case the government should at any
time need their services. The inform-
ation obtained by the legion, care-
fully classified as to qualification and
location by a system of cross indexing,

Coast Cities At
I.fercy of Enemies'
rd Xca'.eer Arfillefry Chief, Tes.
f~ifies Before hol'e
~A'i~hu~tnJan. 20.--Under pros-
es:, conditions the cities of New York
SS an 1 rancisco could be "pounded
o bits by a hostile naval fieet," and
te way ithus openeid for a landing, ac-
rding to General K. M. Weaver, chief
o. oat atile~, hoappeared before
'io louse cot,.;. ittee on military af-
ires today.
General Weaver admitted that the
guns now mounted at the approaches
to New York and San Francisco were
licking in the range sufficient to hold
off the higih power guns mounted on
inodern naval vessels.
The chief of coast artillery told the
committee that steps were being taken
by the government to get New York
and San Francisco in a better state
of preparedness toward warding off
n enemy if attacked. He thought that
with the completion of defenses now
building the two ports could be suc-
cessfully defended against a powerful
enemy.
W1i[SON ANNOUNCES SCHEDULE
S OF WESTERN POLITICAL TOUR
Wthington, Jan. 2.-President
Wilson today fixed on a tentative itin-
erary for his stumping tour. As now
planned he will make speeches in
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri
and Iowa, through a period of six
(lays. A second trip further west and
into the south is being planned to
follow closely on the Presidnet's re-
turn from the first one.

VILLA CAPTURED BY CARRANZA FORCE;
MEXIANI OBDERS EXECUTION
SANTA YS#BELBANDITSO ARE TAKL

* * * * * * *y * * *
Ninety-five per cent of the
senior, junior and -,ophomore
engineering classes voted to
adopt the honor syste nwithout
the pledge at their a::semblies
yesterday.
The system was proposed as
follows:
1. Each student shall sign a
pledge, promising not to give
or receive aid during the exam-
ination.
2. A student reported cheat-
ing will be tried by a. students'
honor committee.
3. The student committee will
recommend suitable punishment
to a discipline committee of the
faculty.
4. The faculty only can en-
force the punishment.
* * * * * * * * * * *

*

BARCIA, CONSUL AT EL'
CONFIRMS SEIZURE
REPORT

P

CHICAGO PRODUCER'
TO DIRECT REVUE

WASHINGTON HEARS RUMORS
Congressman Assails Administration
Policy In Bitter
Attack
El Paso, Tex., Jan. 20.-Francisco
Villa has been captured at Agacienta,
San Geronimo, by Carranza forces un-
der General Ceavazos, says a private
telegram received from Chihuahua
City. His execution had been ordered
by General Carranza. The message
came from the source that first re-
ported the massacre of Americans at
Santa Ysabel. The Mexican consul;
-Andreas Garcia, confirmned the report
of the capture of Villa.
The advices were that the capture
was effected by Maximilio Marguez,
who recently captured General Jose
Rodriguez, one of the Villa generlas.
The 'message announcing Villa's cap-
ture was received at the office of the
American Smelting & Refining com-
pany.
Additional messages from Chihuahua
City related that a number of bandits
who participated in the Santa Ysabel
massacre had been captured and were
being conveyed to Chihuahua City for
execution.
Washington Hears Execution Rumor
Washington, Jan. 20.-It is reported
here late tonight that Villa is to be
shot in the morning. Nothing however
has been officially received.
Mondell Denounces Administration
Washington, Jan. 20.-One of the
most severe denunciations of 'the
(Continued on Page Six)
PADEREWSKI SHOWS
EXCELLENT TALENT
"Fantasia," "Le Coucou," "Etudes
Symphoniges" Among Numbers
Well Received by Audience
SELL AUTOGRAPHED PICTURES

Aubrey Stouffer Choice
Fort Leaves to

of Managers;
Make

Arrangements

is intended for the use of the govern- As the schedule now stands he will
ment. speak at Pittsburg on Saturday, Jan-
The membership of the legion is ,ary 29, and thereafter will pursue
divided into two classes. The first this itinerary: Cleveland, Chicago,
(Continued on Page Six) (Coninued on Page Six)

TO ARRANGE FOR GRAND OPERA
Aubrey Stouffffer, of Chicago, has
been engaged to stage "La Revue des
Nations." He is one of the best known
producers in the middle west, and has
achieved a long list of successes in
the Windy City. It -is expected that
he will appear in Ann Arbor in the
middle of February, and from that
time is to devote all his attention to
putting his cosmopolitan spectacle
in its final form.
William H. Fort, Jr., general mana-
ger of "La Revue," left yesterday for
Chicago, where he is to confer with
Mr. Stouffer and make final arrange-
ments for the date of his arrival here.
Fort will also prepare the way for
the scenic effects which are to be an
(Continued on Page Six)

I-

WHAT'S GOING ON

|I

Whoi C'ompose

BRUCKER, STODDARD AND COTTON .
the Michigan Affirmative Team Which Debates Toight
ix A11111 itoriunm

R'OOSEVELT SLAMS
CONTINENTAL ARMYVI
Asserts Present Program to Be a
Farce, and Entirely In-
adequate
CALLS CONTINENTAL ARMY SHAM
"The proposed Continental Army
is a sham," says Theodore Roosevelt
in a letter to the National Security
League Congress which began in
t Washington yesterday, in which he
scores the suggestion advanced in

ON LYTWENTY-'TWO
J-OP CARDOS LEFT
Remainder of 500 J-Hop Cards to Be
( iceu Out at Union
Today
BOOT 11 DRAWINGS WEDNESDAY
As a result of yesterday's sales, only
22 J-Hop tickets out of the new edi-
tion of 200 additional tickets remain
to be disposed of for the function of
February 11. These few remaining
tickets will be disposed of at the Union
today between 12:00 to 1:00 o'clock.
The sale at that time will be open to
the entire campus, and the first ap-
plicants, regardless of class, will be'
permitted to purchase the pasteboards.
Chaperone tickets will be placed on
sale between the hours of 4:00 and
5:00 o'clock this afternoon. All house
(Coutiiued on Page Six)

Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity-Rain or snow, and warmer;4
strong southerly winds.
TODAY
Gargoyle out, noon.
Students' recital, School of Music,
4:15 o'clock.
Meeting of Hillsdale College Stu-
dents, 1308 Geddes, 7:30 o'clock.
Alpha Nu meeting, 401 U-Hall, 7:00
o'clock.
Michigan -Northwestern debate, Hill
auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Roundup Club dance, Granger's, 9:00
o'clock.
Leap Year party, Michigan Union,
9:00 o'clock.
Athletic Committee meeting, Bar-
bour gym, 4:00 o'clock.
Jeffersonian society meets, Jeffer-
sonian hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Webster society meets, Webster hall,
7:30 o'clock.

Ignace Jan Paderewski, the famous
Polish pianist, who has held. first rank
among pianists for a quarter of a
century, clearly demonstrated his right
to that position last evening when he
appeared in Hill auditorium.
With his unlimited power and re-
sources he showed himself to be the
complete master of the pianoforte,
bringing out every degree of shading
from the most crashing "fortissimo"
to the most quiet and soothing "pian-
issimo."

His entire program was very inter-
esting but the numbers which per-
haps, were the best received were the
Schubert "Fantasia," "Le Coucou," by
C. Daquin, the Schumann "Etudes
Symphoniques," the Liszt "Rhapsodie
Hongroise," and the Chopin group, es-
pecially "Etude No. 11" and the
"Scherzo in B Flat Minor."
Paderewski was very generous upon
this occasion and responded to several
encores, some of which wehe Schu-
mann's "Warum," Chopin's "Military
Polonaise in A Major," and the "Turk-
ish March" by Beethoven. These en-
cores, being familiar numbers, were
especially well received.
Immediately after the concert Mr.
and and Madame Paderewski conduct-
ed a sale in the artists' rooms of auto-
graphed pictures and Polish refugee
dolls, the receipts from which go to
the Polish Relief Fund, Paderewski
(Continued on Page Six)

President Wilson's message, declares
Vienna Reports Russian Setbacks that the American navy has been used
Berlin, by wireless, Jan. 20.-In- as a "bluff defensive force" andj
creasingly violent fighting on the Bess- urges military training for all citi-
arabian frontier is announced by the zens.
Vienna war office, but it is declared "Military training should be re-
all the attacks of superior Russian quired as a matter of right, not asked
forces have been repulsed with heavy as a favor of all our citizens," he
losses to them.en (Continued on Page Six)

TOMORROW
Senior Lit dance, Barbour gym, 2:30j
o'clock.E
Chess club meets, 401 U-hall, 6:15
o'clock.
Cercle Francais presents "La Gram-
maire," Sarah Caswell Angell hall,
3:00 o'clock..
Michigan Union dance, Union, 9:00
o'clock.

15c

T.h Editor is afsving School
ONE HOUR BEFORE THE
MILITARY TRAINING ISSVE of

15c

T HSe
Goes.. onSl

%*,..~Y'LE
TODAYAOAR ASTIC, IRONIC
ARTISTIC, CLEVER

15c

15c

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