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December 01, 1915 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL',

ct That I

11

gw rt other

worn for two and more seasons by most particular

en, is not men-
ned as unusual,
t is significant
characteristic
the service and

satisfaction found
in tailoring
Suits and
0}vereoht s

I -

T IHIS season's style demands
form-fitting clothes. That
makes it absolutely necessary that
experts work on your suit from the
start. And of course,; you require
all wool materials, in your choice
of shade, fabric, and cut.
You'll get just what you want
at The Big Store.

YOUR SUIT

Z,

FASHION PARK
ABLER-ROCHESTER
CLOTHCRAFT
$15 to $35

. r y

Ts Stein-Bob Co.. 1915.
NDENSCHMITT APFEL & CO., Main St.
kw "ko LOT HES
W-- A" 001 o. 400,
11 and 1>olk over our Special at $22.00, any style
308 So.
USMOOTERY State St.
EBERBACH e SON COMPANY

Scientific Apparatus, Chemicals and Student Laboratory Supplies
for Biology, Histology, Bacteriology, Pathology, and Anatomy

E13ERBACUI (a SON

CO. 200-208 r. Liberty St.

W' I

j4

ecia1ty is making
Eye Examinations-'
ng scientifically and
the glasses your eyes

Shop facilities enable me to
make your glasses, giving you
quick service.
We grind lenses.
EMIL H. ARNOLD
Optometrist-Optician
with Arnold & co., Jeweleis,zo2S.2 Main St,
The
Sale
now running is extraordinary
in qualities, fashions, reduc-
tions and is very comprehen-
sive.

Cambridge, Nov. 30.--According to a!
report in circulation at Cambridge
West Point will be back on the Har-
vard schedule in19 1.6
Syracuse, Nov. 30.-Seventy-five
men have reported for the indoor track
season practice. Coach Keane has ask-
ed each Tan to mna'k out a sehedule
the time he can receive personal
cc:.ching. This is a new feature in
the coaching of intercollegiate track
teams, and it is expected to work out
satisfactorily.'
Seattle, Nov. 30.--Gilmour Dobie,
the famous coach of the University of
Washington football team, which has
not lost a game for eight years, has
announced his resignation for the pur-
pose of taking up law. The rumor
that he is considering a proposition to
coach at Wisconsin in 1916 has not
been confirmed.

HHOBBSADVNCES
MORE ARGUM ENTS
(Continued from Page 1)
task. The more advanced the work
becomes, the more broad and diversi-
fled demand does the work make upon
the intelligence of the student.
It may be objected that the real in-
tellectual labor falls upon the officers,
indeed upon the one officer in com-
mand. It is undoubtedly true that
the leader does the most work and
<ts the mcst benefit. but in a student
organization the procedure differs
from that of the army, in that every
effort is made to vary the leadership
and to give the opportunity of leader-
ship to as large a number as possible.
The modern formations favor this, for
every eighth man is a corporal and
responsible for his seven men, and
every sergeant has his squad or pla-
toon, etc.
Development of Character.-The old:
adage that "no one can properly con-
trol others who -cannot first control
himself," is one of these eternal veri-
ties which cannot be too often driven
into the minds of the young college
man. Any young engineer looks for-
ward to controlling others. In a sense
every young college man does, wheth-
er he is an engineer or not, but in
law and medicine and agriculture, the
future direct control of a force of men
does not loom up on the horizon as it
does to one who expects to play a lead-
ing part in the railroad, mine, or fac-
tory. But how shall we get this power
of leadership? How shall we learn to
impose our will upon others and still
keep their respect and regard? I
believe in the laboratory method in
"lost things and I believe in it here.
Fo give a young man power to control
others, let him first learn how to obey
and to take orders from others. Next,
give him a minor responsibility to di-
rect others, and coach him on his
aults when he begins. Give him in-
creasing chances to command as fast
As he develops ability to use power.
The military organization in a large
college offers an ideal method of giv-
ing just exactly this opportunity. In
a college regiment the size of the
companies is usually cut down materi-
ally, and the number of officers can
be increased considerably over the
statutory proportion, without dimin-
ishing the prestige of the officers' po-
sition to any degree. In this way
large numbers of the men get the ex-
perience of commanding troops-in
fact, every one who develops the least
facility or promise in that direction. A
yung man who cannot develop lead-
ership in a military organization is a
young man whose attributes as an en-
gineer need investigation.
Anoth1er factor in leadership is the
ability to read character. No better
place exists in the world to practice
this art than in the selection of men
for office. Every company captain
must study his men, and in making his
selections for promotion, under the
watchful care of his superior officer,
he himself learns a most important
lesson.
Another factor in character build-
ing is the high standard of personal
honor which must go with any effect-
ive military control. A soldier is
taught a very simple but a very se-
vere code of behavior. Hle must tell
the truth and hate a lie. He must
enforce respect for his own rights and
must show equal respect for the rights
(Continued on Page 6)

The s-re-satisfaction way to
buy your suit or overcoat is to
have us m a k e it to your
measure.
Suit or Overcoat

Reule, Conlin & Fiegel
THE BIG STORE 200-202 Main Street

1--

COME IN

MADE-TO-YOUR
MEASURE

T N1

It's remarkable how much you
can get out of life when you do the
right thing at the right time and in
the right place.
These large, roomy coats,double-
breasted, with belted back, can be
worn in three different ways. You
can button it to the neck and then
the collar can be-thrown up to cover
the ears, or it can be buttoned with
tab. It has reversible sleeve tabs.
Don't buy an overcoat without
proper styl. See FITFORM in all
models at $15, $20, $25 and $30.
TOM CORBETT
118 E. Libetty Young Men's Clothier

We guarantee perfect fit, first
c 1 as s workmanship, correct
style, and high grade all-wool
materials.
Hundreds of patterns to se-
lect from, including all the
new shades and plaids.
$120 $22.50

Cold Weather
Freezing Temperature
is Delightful

When you have the
Right Overcoat.

I
1
i
I
E

Will YOU try a
sensible ci

up to
$140

Fatimas have a taste
that wins most men on
the first 'trial. That
must be true. Other-'
wise, Fatimas would
not be outselling every
other cigarette costing'
over 5c.
But what reansmn

Fred W. Gross

Branch Salesroom
Next to Delta

I

DETROIT JOR LITTO
LECTURE SUNDRY NIGHT

The famous Wolf.Martin
and Ami-french brands
are included complete.

(Second Floor)

JIames F. Schermerhorn to Speak
Y. 13. (. A. Meet on "The
Pen vs. the Sword"

at

so loyal' to Fatimas is
that Fatimas play fair
in every way. They
never, taste "hot" "and.
t e Stoy iaR."IG ;E.
2a l"t"th ofndthe ,,,
e :bat- ut te e~o!4,Je_ T ia'ae .. t he Yt
71e.1 '' ~Y
t "jdyuareae;t°° fote he ns o g rorkssadi te .j;
. O phlpt p unaodootht tt ). it "li ni
a h cuete Y eudl, r toa ft ec u e ptva c~t' e orta 18a
It " th1aoud or farse on d tet od 51,ies oand oI thas gi gh Upa
Pb at l aoa" s Ltht b,,,;a& Fn on ~d h o
of n5~ikel,~b e .?1o

never leave a "sand
paper tickle" oran
"mean feeling"' after
continued smoking.
Fatimas are truly a
sensible cigarette
because
--they arealways cooland
confortableto thethroat
and tongue and
-they leave one feeling
tip-top even, after a long
smoking day.
-they are packedina com-.
mon-sense, inexpensive
package. The value is in
the cigarettes.
Their Turkish blend
of all-pure tobaccos is
combined in such a
way as to make them
always comfortably
mild, yet rich in good
tobacco-character.
Try them yourself.

Madison, Wis., Nov. 30.---Because a
student poll would take too long, and
there was urgent need of haste, a com-
mittee from the student body appeared
before the board of regents, to protest
Wilson Will Advocate Preparedness against the retaining of Coach Juneau,
Washington, Nov. 30.-Patriotic ap- and to recommend a suitable substi-
peals to the country for the full meas- tute for 1916 football coach.
ure of national preparedness, not only Salt Lake, Nov. 30.-The Utah
against attacking foreign foes but Chronicle, the student organ of the
from enemies at home, will be made iUniversity of Utah, agreed some time
by President Wilson in his annual ad- ago not to print liquor advertisements.
dress to Congress to be delivered a Now, because they refuse to take the
week from Thursday. The president same action regarding cigarette adver-
completed his address late this after- tisementsithe faculty threatens to take
noon. drastic action.

James F. Schermerhorn, editor of
the Detroit Times, has been engaged
to speak at the big Y. M. C. A. meet-
ing Sunday evening in University
hall.
Mr. Schermerhorn will speak - on
"The Pen vs. the Sword," in which he
shows the power and influence of
written speech. The Detroit man has
delivered parts of this address on sim-
ilar occasions and each time has ad-
ded to the force and vigor of his
thought.
The journalist has been a frequent
visitor in Ann Arbor, where he has
appeared before various organizations.
Mr. Schermerhorn has always proved
an interesting and sincere speaker.
The meeting will open promptly at
6:30 o'clock and will close in time not
to interfere with other church serv-
ices. A special musical program is
now being prepared.

Fatima 'was the only 'ci,,
aewarded the GRAND A,
the highest awar g ivene
{ iyarette at the Pa nama.l
Ynternatio'nat Exposition.

A

THE TURKISH $LEN D
C a0rette
II'FTIA

1

- U______________________________________ I -

Leave Copy
at
Quarry's and
The Delta

CASTIED

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

- I -

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Three fine office rooms,
suitable for a doctor or dentist; all
piped and wired; guaranteed steam
heat. 1713-MOR, 1661-J. J. K. Mal-
colm. nov16tf
MISCELLANEOUS
The McCain House has places for
two at tables. 614 Monroe.
nov.28-30 dec.1

4'OUNI)

1

FOUND--Some time ago, a "Boston
Safety" fountain pen in the Natural
Science lecture room. Ow nr hay
have same by calling and paying for
this ad. 2 E. Jefferson St. Phon

Possibilities of The"Ukulele"
It can accompany the most difficult music written,
as well as the simpler gems.
To Any One Learning.
The pleasure derived from the Ukulele in a few
weeks' tuition far excels that of any other instrument.
WE ARE STATE AGENTS FOR THE GENUINE
CRINNELL BROS. MUSIC HOUSE
116 S. Main St. COMPETENT INSTRUCTORS, UKULELES FROM$6.00 UP. Phone 1707

a..,. ...®,.

III

Buy your Mazda lamps at Switzer's,
310 South State. oct23tf
Call Lyndon for good pictures.
In future all cars stop at Goodyear's
Drug Store. tt
If there is one thing on earth which
we would rather do than anything else
on earth, it is to get you there when
you are in a hurry. Stark, 2255.'
Just glance over that Reule, Con-
lin & Fiegel ad, and then come into
the store and look over the suits.
% ov3-7-12-17-21 1

Seniors. Don't delay and have yi
Michiganensian pictures made
Hopbe's studio. nov28,30, d
Pianos to rent. Prices and pia
right, at Schaeberle & Son's M
House, 110 South Main' street. oc
"'TEVNTION STUDES?"
For quick MESSENGER CALL
last ad on BACK OF TELEPHONE
RECTORY.. Phone 795. ;.'17E.
CLOTHIG
from the House of Ruppenhehne
sale by N. F. Allen A Co., I
sreot. wed

K-

1369-.

nov30 deci

l ,

WIN

A *AV4& If DbIgmUc

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