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December 01, 1915 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-12-01

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SIX TtIE MICHIGAN DAIL).

IL .1

j

CALENDARSg
For Picture Inserts - The grandest
line ever shown- made to fit any size pictures---
some for enlargements-and they make most wel-
come "little gifts." Don't put it off until the last
minute, bring in your negatives now.
L--Y

II

alestiC

NOW
Playing

I

THE CANARY CARUSO
THE MYSTIC BIRD
-----IN THE
JACK KENNEDY & CO.- - FLAREACK
SIG. FRANCE & CO. TNE WOL
e Y TELLING ABOUT
ARTHUR RICBY WAR AND POLITICS
THE HALKINGS ANNDSILHOUETTES

The< "Windsor", is especially recommended to young men who
want the style of the "hour" at moderate price. A last smart
Eastern shops are featuring in their highest grade boots at highest prices
Our price $4.50 - $5.00

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ithese desirable
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1101111 5s AVACES
MORE ARGUMENTS
(Continued from Page Five)
of others. As he wears the uniform
of his organization, he must be a gen-
tleman, first, last, and all the time,
or he will disgrace his friends as well
as himself. He must-love his country
and serve it with a single mind, even
to death. Not a bad platform for a
young college man to learn, is it?
Of the U. S. army officials who are
cordially approving and aiding mili-
tary training in universities, Dean
Lloyd says: "The suspicion is quite un-
avoidable that their approval is on
half-a-loaf-is - better - than - no-bread
grounds." Better than suspicion is
a study of the facts. The purpose of
military instruction in universities is
set forth in General Orders No. 70, sec.
25, 1913, as follows:
"The main object of the military in-
struction given at civil educational
institutions having army officers as
professors of military science and tac-
tics will be to qualify students who
enter the military departments of such
institutions to be company officers of
infantry,; volunteers or militia."
Do the universities accomplish what
is expected of them? I shall take the
case of our sister university in the
state of Illinois, whose system of train-
ing is practically that which it has
been proposed to introduce at the
University of Michigan. - The report
upon the last inspection by the In-
spector-General's Department contains
the following statement: "The mili-
tary instrnction is of such extent and
thoroughness in the case of cadet of-
ficers, as to qualify the average cadet
as a lieutenant of volunteers." The
professor of military science at the
University of Illinois, Major F. D.
Webster, U. S. A., in his report to
President James, comments upon this
report as follows: "The above report
indicates that we are turning out men
qualified to become officers of the vol-
unteer army in case of emergency, and
are doing our part to build up a re-
serve force."
The University of Illinois graduated
33 of this class in 1915,and will grad-
uate 44 in 1916. Michigan with her
three regiments, as against the two at
Illinois, should supply 66 commission-
ed officers each year for the United
States volunteers, besides the much
larger body qualified for non-commis-
sioned rank and privates with train-
ing.
Testimony to the high value placed
upon university military training by
officials of the United States army
when the training is ably conducted,
is contained in the following letter
which I am permitted to publish:
Headquarters, Eastern Department,
Governors Island, May 11, 1915.
President E. J. James,
University of Illinois,
Urbana-Champaign, Ill.
Dear Sir:
I wish to express to you my appre-
ciation of the splendid work which is
being done under your direction at the
University of Illinois in the way of
preparing the youth of our country to
lischarge not only their civil, but also
their military obligations. I have never
been more interested anywhere than
with the work which you are doing
and the wisdom and foresight with
which expenditures have been made
with an eye to the future. If every
Land Grant college had proceeded
with equal sincerity and loyalty to the
spirit of the Endowment act, with its
obligation for military training, we
should be far better prepared than we
are for national defense in the way
of trained men, and our people would
have a much fuller conception of their

abligations to the state from the sol-
:ier standpoint than at present.
I sincerely hope you will continue to
:eceive the support and approval of
the state authorities in the future, as
you have in the past, and that the
great university in your charge will
continue to show the universities of
sister states what can be done by well
irected effort.
It was an inspiring sight to see the
two regiments, and I feel convinced
that every man who has had military
training will leave the university all
the better for it, riot only physically,
but morally and from the standpoint
of a better appreciation of the duties
of citizenship.
Very truly yours,
(Signed)
MAJ.-GEN. LEONARD WOOD.
But the question of university mili-

Mainee Week of
Wednesday
and Sat. INo29
DETROIT
The Big MusicaI Review
"WITHIN THE LOOP"
34 Musical Numbers

4

Thurs. & rest of week
E VA F A Y
FRIQ Y LADIES MATINEE

Shows at 3, 6:30, 8:oo, and 9:30 P M.
Wednesday, Dee: i-Frederick Lewis
in the .remarkale screen drama,
"Bought." World.
Thursday, Dec. 2-Gail Kane 'in "her
Great Match," by Clyde Fitch. Metro.
Friday, Dec. 3-Franci-X.ushman and
Beverly Bayne in their great success,
"Pennington's Chdice." Metro.
" yrip Around the World" every Satur-
day
Mcnday, Dec. 6 C'Iharlie Chaplin in
his greatst comedy, "Work

GYMNASIUM SHOES
FOR MEN AND WOMEN--RUBBER OR LEATHER SOLIS
Prices 70c to $1.90 per pair
Just received a New Basket Ball Shoe for Men
ONLY $3.00 PER PAIR-HEAVY SUCTION IUBBER SOLE

I

Next Monday
"DAMAGED GOODS"
SEATS NOW READY

Quality'-Variety-Values
wgoNIs JEWELERS ATCf
ANDSYFRIED
IK3 3ELIBERY
pNARe SILVERSMITHS A4ARDO
SCHLANDERER & SEYFRIED
tary training is in reality a much
broader one. University men in case
of a long coitinued general war are as
a class certain to arrive at positions
of command, whether they have orig-
inally had military training or not. As
a high official of the army says:
"We realize 'that the best type of
our young men are to be found in our
colleges and universities and an enor-
mous influence they will carry into
public life. They are, or will be, na-
tural leaders, politically in time of
peace, and comnnianders of men in time
of war. In the former capacity a lack
of proper information as to our mil-
itary history, policy and present sys-
tem, certainly renders them incapable
of intelligently voting on these ques-
tions or shaping the opinion of others.
"In the latter capacity, as command-
ers of our citizen soldiery in time of
sudden war without training and ne-
cessary military education, they would
be the unwitting murderers of their
men. They would learn their business
ate a cruel cost in lives, to say the
least.
"These students are physically, men-
tally and morally good material for
officers and such as desire or have a
natural bent for the profession of
arms, having duly qualified, should re-
ceive a definite status in the military
system of the country."
Dean Lloyd argues that the function
of training for soldiers belongs nor-
mally to the government, as all must
agree; and in conclusion he declares,
"Soldiers or citizens who expect war
or feel the danger of war should be,
or quickly become, sufficiently rational
and intelligent, say even academic, to
call for effective, centralized, govern-
mental preparation." The local branch
of the National Security League, of
which Dean Lloyd is a distinguished
member, has recently been organized
for no other purpose than the one he
has indicated. Last Saturday at the
first national convention of the organ-
ization, no less than 200 delegates
from all parts of the country assem-
bled in Chicago for the purpose of
determining the definite policy of the
organization. This assembly is likely
to become notable by reason of the
eminence in public life of many of the
delegates, whose number included no
less than three ex-Secretaries of War
of the United States. There was abso-
lute unanimity that the country is in
danger of invasion by a foreign power,
and that it is now almost helpless to
defend itself. A resolution was pass-
ed calling upon the President of the
United States to immediately make
public the recommendations of the
army experts upon measures of na-
tional defense, with which the Presi-
dent's announced program is under-
stood to be widely at variance.
If the committee of the university
senate and the National Security
League both favor immediate action
by Congress to supply the elements of
national defense, they none the less
realize that when legislative action
has been taken there remain enormous
difficulties. No one of these- will be
more serious than that of suplying
officers to the enlarged army. The
most hopeful quarter in which to look
for material is the higher institutions

119 E. LIBERTY STREET

TEA DANSANTS
Beginning Monday, Nov. 29, we are instittt-
ing our Afternoon Parties.
Dancing will- begin at 2:30 P. M. and continue
until 5 P. M.
A very appropriate Luncheon will be served
during the Dansant for 60c a couple.
NEW DELTA CAFE
Entrance on Packard Street

extra
quality
expert
t - hoc leev
With splayed blades of spe-
cial treated Synthloy steel,
hardened and tempered,
specially polished, nickel-
plated and buffed.
Pair, $7.50
Manufactured by
A. G. SPALDING & RPOS
121W oodward Ave. DETROIT.MICH.
of learning, and there could be no
more striking evidence of the high
value which War Department officials
place upon military training in univer-
sities, than is found in the recom-
mendations 6f Mr. Secretary Garrison.
Thrugh the shortage of army officers
is serious and increases yearly, Mr.
Garrison recommends that existing{
legislation be so modified as to permit
the detail of one commissioned officer
for each 400 students in training at
universities as against one officer for
each institution as now required by
law.
WM. H. HOBBS.
HERNANDEZ LECTURES BEFORE
FOREIGNERS ON PORTO RICAN S
Jose M. Hernandez, assistant in
Spanish, gave an interesting talk at
the meeting of -the Cosmopolitan club.
in Harris hall Sunday afternoon., He
ave a brief history of Porto Rico,
showing the improvements in com-
nerce and education that have been
nade since American invasion, and
rave some strong arguinents for Porto
Rican representation in congress.
There will be no meeting next Sun-.
lay, but members of the club will meet
n Harris hall at 7:30 o'clock Friday
evening to discuss plans for the Cos-
nopolitan concert to be given in Hill
auditorium in January or February.
Notices of the next social gathering
will be mailed to the members..
Weinberg's Coliseum is again dpen.
for roller skating. decl-2

Ska in Season Soon
ARE YOU PREPAREO?
KATES They're Taylor
HOES Goods
TICKS That Insures
URTS Quality
FOR Quality Means
HOCKEY Service
HOBEY BAKER SAYS
OF TAYLOR STICKS
"I use your sticks to the
exclusion of all others,
because 1I like them
best."
ROY HALLLAW
Local Representative
1317 Washteraw Ave. Tel. 1619M
It'il cost you a card or a phone call to invest-
igate. ,- -
DEAN LLOYD TO ADDRESS SOPH
LIT SMOKER TOMORROW NIGHT
Prof. A. H. Lloyd, dean of the Grad-
uate School, will address the soph lit
class at thei-r first smoker of the year
at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow evening. He
will talk on military training. "Ike"
Fisher's orchestra will furnish the
music for the program, while local
talent will entertain the sophomores
with songp and music during the even-
ing.
Numerals will be awarded by Man-
ager Cleary to the soph lit football
team who put up such a strong fight
for the campus championship. Cider,
smokes andcookies will be present as
usual to gladden the hearts of the
hungry sophomores.
New Postal Substation to Be Opened
A new classified postal substation
will be opened this morning at 222
South State street. The office will be
prepared to take care of the postal
wants of all the residents of the east-
ern part of the city in the same man-
ner as the former station which re-
cently suspended operations at the
Haller jewelry store.
Portraits of merit. Make an ap-
pointment for a sitting at Hoppe's
studio. 619 E. Liberty St.

.eft 14

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