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March 09, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Em,

ALL FORERUNNERS

a

AIn Optimistic Enough,
at He Would Like
'resent Show
his Week.
e term of 'Best Ever"
every theatrical ever
chigan or any other
though the circus and
has not neglected its
ess "A Model Daught-
an Union opera of 1914,
s the "Best of the Best
gp's

rom .
to 12P.M.

The other night at a rehearsal, Di-
rector Bert St. John said, "If our prop-
erties were all on hand I would like,
to give the show this week." Direc-
tors of amateur theatricals are notE
usually very optimistic persons, andy
when a remark of that kind is heardI
from Mr. St. John or any other stage
manager, it means more than face1
value.
In short every department of the
1914 show has worked out so grace-l
fully that "Best Ever" is hardly sup-
erlative enough to describe it. The
fact which will first impress one who
has witnessed other Union operas is,
the strict conformity to modern ideas.1
While shows of the past have pictur-.
ed pretty mithlands, and have gone to
Africa and other remote 'places for
settings, "AyModel Daughter" is a
play of today. In it is no Michigan,
no college, but it is rather an up-to-
date musical comedy. Every part
centers about the modern idea set-
ting, music, plot and costuming.
Most, of the plot comes in the first
act. which is laid in the studio of a
Parisian artist. Although here there
is plenty of song and "high life," and
not a little of women, prettily be-
gowned, it is the second act, the cab-
aret scene, which gives the opera its
distinguishing note. The act is a riot
of women, song, color and dance. The
scene is not for the student of the
serious drama, but aims to be sensa-
tional by giving a picture of Paris
at its height. This is something which
has never been attempted in other
Union operas.
In the dancing, too, there is a sud-
den and pleasing innovation. The
"broiler" has gone from the Union
opera, and in his place comes a host
of one-steppers and tangoers. In
both of these forms, the latest and
most difficult steps have been intro-
duced, but they have been readily
learned by the chorusmen who were
familiar with the modern style of
dancing. The chorus is a little smal-
ler than last year, but with expensive
costuming and added grace in danc-
ing, the management is assured that
the general effect will be better. The

men in the chorus, as well as those
with speaking parts, have been fa-
miliarized with the details of the plot,
and it is thought that they will enter
into their parts with considerable
more zest. In some of the other
shows, the chorus men have sung
their words mechanically, with little
knowledge of the play as a whole.
The cast is also smaller than last
year, the original 17 parts having been
reduced to 13. This elimination, how-
ever, has simplified the action, and has
made the whole play less cumbersome.
Nearly all of the men in the cast are
in their prime as opera participants.
It has been observed that after two
years of opera service, men have be-
come somewhat "stale" and have dis-
played less interest. Nearly all of the
men in this year's cast are in their
second year. Among them are Wal-
do Fellows, '14, Durward Grinstead,
'15L, George Moritz, '15, Gordon C.
Eldredge, '14L, S. L. Adelsdorf, '14L,
and Bernus E. Kline, '14.
SEATS FOR CHICAGO SHOW
MAY BE RESERVED BY NAIL..
Arrangements have been made
whereby all students who desire to
attend the Chicago production of the
Opera on April 4, at the Auditorium
theatre, may make reservations by
communicating with Hiram S. Coedy,
226 South La Salle street, Chicago. No
tickets will be sold in Ann Arbor.
Prices are: box of six seats, $10.00;
single box seats, $2.00; main floor and
first five rows balcony, $1.50; re-1
mainder balcony, $1.00.

lowing fall presented scenes in Ann
Arbor with take-offs on professors,
local names, and was otherwise full
of local color. One scene,however,
was placed in ancient Egypt. Joseph
Hudnut, '12E, wrote the book and the
music was composed by Julius Wuer-
thner, '12L, and Rowland Fixel, '12-
'14L. Karl B. Matthews, '13L, and
Frank Picard, '12, contributed the
lyrics.
"Contrarie Marie" was the offering
last year. The time of presentation
was moved back until spring so that
more time could be given to the training
of chorus and cast, and general polish-
ing of the show. Robert G. Beck, '13L,
wrote the book, and the music was
composed by Willis Diekema, '14, and
Rowland Fixel. Not a scene in this
show was laid in Ann Arbor, but ref-
erences to the locality were numerous.

Waldo Fellows, ot median and Writer
of One Song.
HISTORIES OF
PAST OPERAS
ARE REVIEWED.
(Continued from page 1)
The Crimson Chest presented in the
fall of 1911 was the fourth opera. The
book was the joint offering of Arthur
Moehlman, '12, and Francis Riordan,
'12, with Fred Lawton contributing
the lyrics again. Earl Moore, Robert
T. Moreland, and Arthur Fournier,
'12, divided the honors for the writ-
ing of the melodies. No scene in this
book was based in Ann Arbor, but
reference to Michigan customs and
expressions were common.
"The Awakened Rameses the fol-

Eastern
Michigan

Edison

Majority of Fellowships are
in Graduate School to til
Best Students.
Thirty-five fellowships,' t
many thousands of dollars, are
annually to students maintaini:
residence at the university, I
jority of them being given c
for attendance in the Graduate
Several, however, are offered
dents in the scientific departm
Fifteen of these fellowships
en to Michigan students, and
the past year sixty-five appl
have been received by Dea
Guthe by scholars desiring to
Ten of these are given by the
(Continued on page 4)

aestic

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